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🌔 Selenicereus hamatus 🌒

She only blooms at night and lasts for 24 hours but she teaches to appreciate and enjoy our gifts while they last, to accept the imperance of things, people and experiences, like a sunset, a lover, a kiss, a trip, a summer, a song, a book, a flower, a fire or a life. 🐜

Sometimes referred to as the queen of the night, only night pollinators like bat's and moths can usually enjoy her nectar. However, the giant one that sat in front of my home in Oakland always had tons of bee visitors in the day. 🦇

Some species only bloom once a year in the summer time. This one bloomed last night with the new moon in Cancer, much like the emotions that came to surface while I was dreaming. ☁️ Mom pointered her out to me this morning in the garden and as I took these photos the hummingbird came to thank me for filling her feeder. 🐝

#desertlife #queenofthenight
🌔 Selenicereus hamatus 🌒 She only blooms at night and lasts for 24 hours but she teaches to appreciate and enjoy our gifts while they last, to accept the imperance of things, people and experiences, like a sunset, a lover, a kiss, a trip, a summer, a song, a book, a flower, a fire or a life. 🐜 Sometimes referred to as the queen of the night, only night pollinators like bat's and moths can usually enjoy her nectar. However, the giant one that sat in front of my home in Oakland always had tons of bee visitors in the day. 🦇 Some species only bloom once a year in the summer time. This one bloomed last night with the new moon in Cancer, much like the emotions that came to surface while I was dreaming. ☁️ Mom pointered her out to me this morning in the garden and as I took these photos the hummingbird came to thank me for filling her feeder. 🐝 #desertlife  #queenofthenight 
🔸🔹 The Art of Flying 🔹🔸
Hummingbirds beat their wings from 8-200 times per second. They can fly up to 60 miles per hour in a steep courtship dive, but speeds of 20-45 miles per hour are more common.

Hummingbirds have unique flight abilities and are able to fly not only forward, but also backward, sideways, and straight up. They can also hover extensively, much longer than short-term hovering birds. Hummingbirds can even do aerobatics such as backward somersaults as they dart among flowers searching for  nectar and insects.

Most birds fly with upstrokes and downstrokes, generating all their lift and power on the downstroke of each wing beat. Hummingbirds, however, stroke their wings forward and backward, pivoting up to 180 degrees at the shoulder to rotate the wing.

This pattern, with the wingtip tracing a horizontal figure eight, drawing infinity symbols in the air with each wing beat, generating lift on both forward and backward strokes, keeping the bird aloft and allowing it to hover. A minute twist can change the angle of the wing and influence the flight direction, allowing the hummingbird to change direction instantly no matter which way the wing is stroking. This type of flight control is more closely associated with insects such as dragonflies than with birds, and is a unique adaptation the hummingbird has harnessed for efficient flight.

Amazing migrators, some hummingbirds are known to fly as far as 2000 miles to reach their destination. This quality reminds us to be persistent in the persuit of our dreams, and adopt the tenacity of the hummingbird in our lives.

In many Native American tribes, the hummingbird is a healer who often helps people in times of need and distress. Many tribes have hummingbird clans. To Northwest coastal tribes, the hummingbird is a symbol of good luck.

The ancient Aztec God, Huitzilopochtli, was often pictured as a hummingbird in Aztec art. And the Mayans have a wonderful story about the Great Spirit who created Tzunuum, a hummingbird who was prided for her wonderful flying abilities.

#colibri #hummingbird #spiritguides
🔸🔹 The Art of Flying 🔹🔸 Hummingbirds beat their wings from 8-200 times per second. They can fly up to 60 miles per hour in a steep courtship dive, but speeds of 20-45 miles per hour are more common. Hummingbirds have unique flight abilities and are able to fly not only forward, but also backward, sideways, and straight up. They can also hover extensively, much longer than short-term hovering birds. Hummingbirds can even do aerobatics such as backward somersaults as they dart among flowers searching for  nectar and insects. Most birds fly with upstrokes and downstrokes, generating all their lift and power on the downstroke of each wing beat. Hummingbirds, however, stroke their wings forward and backward, pivoting up to 180 degrees at the shoulder to rotate the wing. This pattern, with the wingtip tracing a horizontal figure eight, drawing infinity symbols in the air with each wing beat, generating lift on both forward and backward strokes, keeping the bird aloft and allowing it to hover. A minute twist can change the angle of the wing and influence the flight direction, allowing the hummingbird to change direction instantly no matter which way the wing is stroking. This type of flight control is more closely associated with insects such as dragonflies than with birds, and is a unique adaptation the hummingbird has harnessed for efficient flight. Amazing migrators, some hummingbirds are known to fly as far as 2000 miles to reach their destination. This quality reminds us to be persistent in the persuit of our dreams, and adopt the tenacity of the hummingbird in our lives. In many Native American tribes, the hummingbird is a healer who often helps people in times of need and distress. Many tribes have hummingbird clans. To Northwest coastal tribes, the hummingbird is a symbol of good luck. The ancient Aztec God, Huitzilopochtli, was often pictured as a hummingbird in Aztec art. And the Mayans have a wonderful story about the Great Spirit who created Tzunuum, a hummingbird who was prided for her wonderful flying abilities. #colibri  #hummingbird  #spiritguides 
As a child, unlike others, I would want to go to bed early so that I could dream. I looked forward to dreaming. I'd sleep far into the day, if I could. I was also notorious for sleepwalking and while so, rambling things at my mother from her bedroom door then not remembering any of my offenses the next day.
✨🚪To enter my dreams, first, I stare at the warm lights from the cars passing on the street down below our house that sat on the big hill in the Presidio. The abstract shapes of the headlights piercing thru my bedroom window, slowing crossing my ceiling over my bed like spaceships beams until I anticipately dozed off. Wisely, I had prepared myself just before I layed down with an simple exit plan, a few words to recite, incase I have that one reaccuring dream where I fall from a cliff into the deep dark cold Pacific Ocean below, endlessly drowning, sinking deeper and deeper with no avail. And endlessly cause apparently we can't die in our dreams, otherwise I surely would have died by now. Regardless, I had taught myself at that early age of 6, that I could wake myself up if I choose, so I did often when necessary.
✨🏹 My favorite dreams were those of flying. Some were as simple, but yet lucid, of me walking down our spiral staircase and when I reached the last 4 steps a voice inside me would remind me that I could simply leap over them to my destination (usually the kitchen for a morning snack). Then I'd giggle at myself for forgetting my super power, before floating effortlessly like a ballon deer over those last minuscule 4 steps. I was no expert, I was very much still mastering my gift. It took a big effort for the initial thrust to get my whole body in the air, sometimes I was unable to keep myself up and bad guys would wave their hands trying to grab at my feet to pull me back down for who knows what. Contrastly, if I flew too high, I'd be pulled into the sun. But man, when I got it right, it was beautiful, flying over roof tops, exploring cities, flying high and low, peering into backyards, gliding under the stars. I remember it so well, the breeze, the color of the sky, the sense of freedom, the joy, the fear, the adventure. So real. #luciddreaming 🦅
As a child, unlike others, I would want to go to bed early so that I could dream. I looked forward to dreaming. I'd sleep far into the day, if I could. I was also notorious for sleepwalking and while so, rambling things at my mother from her bedroom door then not remembering any of my offenses the next day. ✨🚪To enter my dreams, first, I stare at the warm lights from the cars passing on the street down below our house that sat on the big hill in the Presidio. The abstract shapes of the headlights piercing thru my bedroom window, slowing crossing my ceiling over my bed like spaceships beams until I anticipately dozed off. Wisely, I had prepared myself just before I layed down with an simple exit plan, a few words to recite, incase I have that one reaccuring dream where I fall from a cliff into the deep dark cold Pacific Ocean below, endlessly drowning, sinking deeper and deeper with no avail. And endlessly cause apparently we can't die in our dreams, otherwise I surely would have died by now. Regardless, I had taught myself at that early age of 6, that I could wake myself up if I choose, so I did often when necessary. ✨🏹 My favorite dreams were those of flying. Some were as simple, but yet lucid, of me walking down our spiral staircase and when I reached the last 4 steps a voice inside me would remind me that I could simply leap over them to my destination (usually the kitchen for a morning snack). Then I'd giggle at myself for forgetting my super power, before floating effortlessly like a ballon deer over those last minuscule 4 steps. I was no expert, I was very much still mastering my gift. It took a big effort for the initial thrust to get my whole body in the air, sometimes I was unable to keep myself up and bad guys would wave their hands trying to grab at my feet to pull me back down for who knows what. Contrastly, if I flew too high, I'd be pulled into the sun. But man, when I got it right, it was beautiful, flying over roof tops, exploring cities, flying high and low, peering into backyards, gliding under the stars. I remember it so well, the breeze, the color of the sky, the sense of freedom, the joy, the fear, the adventure. So real. #luciddreaming  🦅
🌊 Studying water spirits this morning led to these beautiful photos.

Sak Yant ~ Yantra Tattoos 
Introduced by the Khmer people of the Khmer Empire.

Pali phrases that offer power, protection, good fortune, charisma and other benefits to the wearer, done by a magic practitioner, monk or shaman.

Photos by Cedric Arnold

#Thai #Khmer #Burmese #Philippines #Indonesia #Cambodia #Laos #Myanmar 
#Sacredgeometry #TribalAnimism #muaythai
⛲ Spent my day at a Natural Mineral Spring surrounded by a variety of plants and birds, including hummingbirds, and bees. Here the pink sunset is reflecting off my legs. I feel amazing.

The natural Mineral Springs provided the native Cahuilla with clean water, a place for bathing, and a connection point with a spiritual underworld populated by nukatem, or ancient sacred beings. The hot spring waters were also utilized for healing purposes and healing ceremonies. The Cahuilla Indian name for the Palm Springs area was Sec-he (boiling water). In the Yucatan, México, a natural pit, pool, or sinkhole, resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes mineral rich groundwater underneath are called cenotes. For the Mayan, cenotes are seen as the gateway to the underworld or afterlife and entrance requires permission from the rain god Chaac. Cenotes are a place of healing and in ancient Maya, the cenotes were sometimes used for sacrificial offerings, both human and artifacts. The jungle area with several cenotes, just 5 minutes from my home in the Yucatan is called Sac be.

The underground water systems of Aqua Caliente, or Palm Springs, California and the cenotes of the Yucatan, Mexico are both viewed as sacred and healing places that lead to the underworld. Also the Cahuilla language, which includes the Native people's of Palm Springs, is uto aztecan but  in their own language, their autonym is ʔívil̃uqaletem, and the name of their language is ʔívil̃uʔat (Ivilyuat), however they also call themselves táxliswet meaning 'person'. Cahuilla Mythology consists of several dieties, including of the hot springs named Sungrey, Medicine, who founded the hot springs, Agua Caliente, in the desert. ⛲

Other Cahuilla dieties:
🌬️ Kutya'i – Spirit of wind, mischievous, nocturnal, steals clothing.
🌖 Menily – a Lunar deity.
🌈 Mukat – the Creator.
🦉 Muut – Psychopomp, often depicted as an owl.
🐐 Pemtemweha – Protector of animals, often seen as a white deer.
🐶 Tawuqui - A trickster god, he comes out at night to steal souls and cause mischief.
⛲ Spent my day at a Natural Mineral Spring surrounded by a variety of plants and birds, including hummingbirds, and bees. Here the pink sunset is reflecting off my legs. I feel amazing. The natural Mineral Springs provided the native Cahuilla with clean water, a place for bathing, and a connection point with a spiritual underworld populated by nukatem, or ancient sacred beings. The hot spring waters were also utilized for healing purposes and healing ceremonies. The Cahuilla Indian name for the Palm Springs area was Sec-he (boiling water). In the Yucatan, México, a natural pit, pool, or sinkhole, resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes mineral rich groundwater underneath are called cenotes. For the Mayan, cenotes are seen as the gateway to the underworld or afterlife and entrance requires permission from the rain god Chaac. Cenotes are a place of healing and in ancient Maya, the cenotes were sometimes used for sacrificial offerings, both human and artifacts. The jungle area with several cenotes, just 5 minutes from my home in the Yucatan is called Sac be. The underground water systems of Aqua Caliente, or Palm Springs, California and the cenotes of the Yucatan, Mexico are both viewed as sacred and healing places that lead to the underworld. Also the Cahuilla language, which includes the Native people's of Palm Springs, is uto aztecan but in their own language, their autonym is ʔívil̃uqaletem, and the name of their language is ʔívil̃uʔat (Ivilyuat), however they also call themselves táxliswet meaning 'person'. Cahuilla Mythology consists of several dieties, including of the hot springs named Sungrey, Medicine, who founded the hot springs, Agua Caliente, in the desert. ⛲ Other Cahuilla dieties: 🌬️ Kutya'i – Spirit of wind, mischievous, nocturnal, steals clothing. 🌖 Menily – a Lunar deity. 🌈 Mukat – the Creator. 🦉 Muut – Psychopomp, often depicted as an owl. 🐐 Pemtemweha – Protector of animals, often seen as a white deer. 🐶 Tawuqui - A trickster god, he comes out at night to steal souls and cause mischief.
🏹 Citrine 🏹 Centaur 🏹 Cusp 🏹

Cusp ~ A point of transition between two different states.
🏹 Citrine 🏹 Centaur 🏹 Cusp 🏹 Cusp ~ A point of transition between two different states.
🦇 Labradorite 🦇 6am 🦇 Wanderlust 🦇

Wanderlust ~ a strong longing for or impulse to travel.
🦇 Labradorite 🦇 6am 🦇 Wanderlust 🦇 Wanderlust ~ a strong longing for or impulse to travel.
🌌 Azurite 🌌 5am Blues 🌌 Sin filtro 🌌

#desertblues
🌌 Azurite 🌌 5am Blues 🌌 Sin filtro 🌌 #desertblues 
🍊🍑 Memento 🍑🍊
🍊🍑 Memento 🍑🍊
💋 Two lovers' limbs
conjoined under the full moon. 💋

#portals #doubleexposure #sagurocactus #desertskies #moonlightlovers #deerspirit
🦉 Many native traditions held clowns and tricksters as essential to any contact with the sacred. People could not pray until they had laughed, because laughter opens and frees from rigid preconception. Humans had to have tricksters within the most sacred ceremonies for fear that they forget the sacred comes through upset, reversal, surprise. The trickster in most native traditions is essential to creation, to birth. 🦉

#sacred #coyotespirit #coyotepeople #coyotl #Huehuecoyotl #shango #anasi
🦉 Many native traditions held clowns and tricksters as essential to any contact with the sacred. People could not pray until they had laughed, because laughter opens and frees from rigid preconception. Humans had to have tricksters within the most sacred ceremonies for fear that they forget the sacred comes through upset, reversal, surprise. The trickster in most native traditions is essential to creation, to birth. 🦉 #sacred  #coyotespirit  #coyotepeople  #coyotl  #Huehuecoyotl  #shango  #anasi 
Since time immemorial, the Palm Springs area has been home to the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians for generations. Archaeological research has discovered that the Cahuilla have occupied Tahquitz Canyon for at least 5,000 years, mirroring the migration stories of the Cahuilla people.

The Cahuilla Indian name for the Palm Springs area was Sec-he (boiling water); the Spanish who arrived named it Agua Caliente (hot water). And then came the name "Palm Springs" in reference to both the native Washingtonia filifera palm tree and the Agua Caliente Hot Mineral Spring. The Hot Spring waters provided the Cahuilla with clean water, a place for bathing, and a connection point with a spiritual underworld populated by nukatem, or ancient sacred beings. The hot spring waters were also utilized for healing purposes. The ceremonial life of the Cahuilla was a rich one. Elaborate ceremonies marked every important milestone in life. Song was a big part of life. Men and women sang while they worked, they sang during ceremonies with some songs lasting days. Today, remnants of the traditional Cahuilla society exist such as rock art, house-pits and foundations, irrigation ditches, dams, reservoirs, trails, and food preparation areas, which still exist in the canyons.

#cahuillanation #aquacaliente #palmspringsdesert #hotminerialsprings
Since time immemorial, the Palm Springs area has been home to the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians for generations. Archaeological research has discovered that the Cahuilla have occupied Tahquitz Canyon for at least 5,000 years, mirroring the migration stories of the Cahuilla people. The Cahuilla Indian name for the Palm Springs area was Sec-he (boiling water); the Spanish who arrived named it Agua Caliente (hot water). And then came the name "Palm Springs" in reference to both the native Washingtonia filifera palm tree and the Agua Caliente Hot Mineral Spring. The Hot Spring waters provided the Cahuilla with clean water, a place for bathing, and a connection point with a spiritual underworld populated by nukatem, or ancient sacred beings. The hot spring waters were also utilized for healing purposes. The ceremonial life of the Cahuilla was a rich one. Elaborate ceremonies marked every important milestone in life. Song was a big part of life. Men and women sang while they worked, they sang during ceremonies with some songs lasting days. Today, remnants of the traditional Cahuilla society exist such as rock art, house-pits and foundations, irrigation ditches, dams, reservoirs, trails, and food preparation areas, which still exist in the canyons. #cahuillanation  #aquacaliente  #palmspringsdesert  #hotminerialsprings 
🌲 Palo Verde Tree 🌲
Flora of southwestern North America, in regions of Southern Arizona, Southwest California and Northwestern, Mexico. This tree gets alot of photosynthesis thru its bright green bark. 1/3 of its food is produced by its leaves. This tree was a food source and the wood was used for carving laddles for indigenous Queshan, Mojave, and Pima people. The beans or seeds pods and the yellow flowers are edible, either fresh or cooked. They can live over 100 years some even up to 400. They are named the Arizona state tree and the city tree of South Miami, Florida. 🦎
This is the tree I was curious about and had Ro  touch the other day, where a hummingbird greeted me.

#desertfuana ##californiadesert #desertcolors #senoradesert
🌲 Palo Verde Tree 🌲 Flora of southwestern North America, in regions of Southern Arizona, Southwest California and Northwestern, Mexico. This tree gets alot of photosynthesis thru its bright green bark. 1/3 of its food is produced by its leaves. This tree was a food source and the wood was used for carving laddles for indigenous Queshan, Mojave, and Pima people. The beans or seeds pods and the yellow flowers are edible, either fresh or cooked. They can live over 100 years some even up to 400. They are named the Arizona state tree and the city tree of South Miami, Florida. 🦎 This is the tree I was curious about and had Ro touch the other day, where a hummingbird greeted me. #desertfuana  ##californiadesert  #desertcolors  #senoradesert 
☁️ Blue deer dreaming ☁️
Cereus Peruvianus Apple Cactus with Pitaya Fruit 
#californiadesert #palmdesert #desertfuana #desertsucculents