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Brother of Parkland shooter arrested for violating his probation
Brother of Parkland shooter arrested for violating his probation
Texas and six other states filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday challenging the constitutionality of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. 📰 See Stories for full story.
Texas and six other states filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday challenging the constitutionality of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. 📰 See Stories for full story.
BREAKING NEWS: After 40 years, the ‘Original Night Stalker’ has been caught outside of Sacramento.
BREAKING NEWS: After 40 years, the ‘Original Night Stalker’ has been caught outside of Sacramento.
Kanye being Kanye...I’m all the way tuned in 📺 🍿
Kanye being Kanye...I’m all the way tuned in 📺 🍿
#repost #theverge

In a world first, a US veteran now has a new penis and scrotum
#repost  #theverge  In a world first, a US veteran now has a new penis and scrotum
#repost #cnn
Indianapolis Colts linebacker Edwin Jackson and another man were struck and killed by an undocumented immigrant in a suspected drunken driving accident. Jackson had just turned 27 years old at the time of the incident.
#repost  #cnn  Indianapolis Colts linebacker Edwin Jackson and another man were struck and killed by an undocumented immigrant in a suspected drunken driving accident. Jackson had just turned 27 years old at the time of the incident.
#repost #washingtonpost
Until recently, she could often go full days without reminders of what happened. She preferred it that way. The event was so long ago. It was so terrible. She’d been pardoned for her crimes, and she’d tried to build a new version of her life. She got married. She raised two children. She attended church. She went on hikes — relaxing ones, short ones, nothing like the mandatory 60-mile treks she’d taken when training as a spy.
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But now, the reminders of what Kim Hyon-hui once did again seem to be everywhere. South Korea is hosting the Winter Olympics this month, and even seeing the Olympic rings gives her flashbacks to 30 years ago, the other time this country was preparing to host the Games. Then, Kim was an elite North Korean agent. She was acting on national orders. She boarded a South Korean passenger plane, carrying a time bomb. She left the bomb in an overhead bin. She exited the plane during a layover. The plane blew up. There was a manhunt for the perpetrators. Kim was captured. And then, Kim was taken for the first time to South Korea, arrested for an act of terrorism that killed 115 people and was designed to derail the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.
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Thirty years later, Kim’s life speaks to the disorienting contrasts on the Korean Peninsula, where the Olympics can be peaceful or deadly, unifying or dividing, and where a terrorist can become a housewife who says she’s excited to watch the 2018 Games on TV. “In North Korea, I lived as Kim Il Sung’s robot,” Kim said in an interview. “In South Korea, I got to live a new life.”
•
Kim, who has given a handful of interviews about the bombing in recent months as the Winter Olympics approached, spoke expansively about her new life in South Korea. She no longer resembles the spy who was given eight years of physical and ideological training. She is 56 years old. She lives on the outskirts of South Korea’s third-largest city. She wears glasses and keeps her hair short. She no longer practices taekwondo. She no longer has an interest in knife combat or code-cracking. “Can my sins be pardoned?” she said. “They probably won’t be.”
#repost  #washingtonpost  Until recently, she could often go full days without reminders of what happened. She preferred it that way. The event was so long ago. It was so terrible. She’d been pardoned for her crimes, and she’d tried to build a new version of her life. She got married. She raised two children. She attended church. She went on hikes — relaxing ones, short ones, nothing like the mandatory 60-mile treks she’d taken when training as a spy. • But now, the reminders of what Kim Hyon-hui once did again seem to be everywhere. South Korea is hosting the Winter Olympics this month, and even seeing the Olympic rings gives her flashbacks to 30 years ago, the other time this country was preparing to host the Games. Then, Kim was an elite North Korean agent. She was acting on national orders. She boarded a South Korean passenger plane, carrying a time bomb. She left the bomb in an overhead bin. She exited the plane during a layover. The plane blew up. There was a manhunt for the perpetrators. Kim was captured. And then, Kim was taken for the first time to South Korea, arrested for an act of terrorism that killed 115 people and was designed to derail the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. • Thirty years later, Kim’s life speaks to the disorienting contrasts on the Korean Peninsula, where the Olympics can be peaceful or deadly, unifying or dividing, and where a terrorist can become a housewife who says she’s excited to watch the 2018 Games on TV. “In North Korea, I lived as Kim Il Sung’s robot,” Kim said in an interview. “In South Korea, I got to live a new life.” • Kim, who has given a handful of interviews about the bombing in recent months as the Winter Olympics approached, spoke expansively about her new life in South Korea. She no longer resembles the spy who was given eight years of physical and ideological training. She is 56 years old. She lives on the outskirts of South Korea’s third-largest city. She wears glasses and keeps her hair short. She no longer practices taekwondo. She no longer has an interest in knife combat or code-cracking. “Can my sins be pardoned?” she said. “They probably won’t be.”
#repost #foxnews
The fast fashion retailer is in hot water for one of its newest designs, which is being called out on social media as an example of cultural appropriation. The retailer came under fire this week for selling a plaid "check mini skirt," which the website describes as a "flowing skirt with draped detail in the front."
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However, many were quick to point out on Twitter that the garment suspiciously resembles a lungi, or lungyi, longyi, sarong, etc., traditionally worn by people in India and other South and Southeast Asian countries.
Elizabeth Segran, a reporter for Fast Company who grew up in Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, described the lungi as a popular item worn by many people, mostly men, "who wanted something casual, cool and relaxed to wear in the equatorial heat of Southeast Asia. They're the garment of the masses, a great equalizer, worn by both royalty and day laborers."
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The reporter also noted that an everyday sarong typically costs under $3, which is a stark contrast to Zara's $90 price tag. And while people clearly took issue with the hefty price tag, they were also upset by the fact that Zara failed to credit the lungi as inspiration for the piece.
#repost  #foxnews  The fast fashion retailer is in hot water for one of its newest designs, which is being called out on social media as an example of cultural appropriation. The retailer came under fire this week for selling a plaid "check mini skirt," which the website describes as a "flowing skirt with draped detail in the front." • However, many were quick to point out on Twitter that the garment suspiciously resembles a lungi, or lungyi, longyi, sarong, etc., traditionally worn by people in India and other South and Southeast Asian countries. Elizabeth Segran, a reporter for Fast Company who grew up in Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, described the lungi as a popular item worn by many people, mostly men, "who wanted something casual, cool and relaxed to wear in the equatorial heat of Southeast Asia. They're the garment of the masses, a great equalizer, worn by both royalty and day laborers." • The reporter also noted that an everyday sarong typically costs under $3, which is a stark contrast to Zara's $90 price tag. And while people clearly took issue with the hefty price tag, they were also upset by the fact that Zara failed to credit the lungi as inspiration for the piece.
#repost #cbsnews
At least two people were killed and 116 others injured when a train traveling from New York to Miami struck a freight train Sunday morning, authorities said. The crash left thousands of gallons of oil spilled at the scene near Columbia, South Carolina.
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The collision occurred in Cayce around 2:45 a.m. Sunday, Lexington County spokesperson Harrison Cahill said. He said the injuries ranged from scratches to broken bones.
The two victims were later identified as Amtrak personnel. Lexington County Coroner Margaret Fisher said 54-year-old engineer Michael Kempf and 32-year-old conductor Michael Sella were killed in the collision.
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There were approximately 148 people aboard the Amtrak Train 91, including 139 passengers and eight crew members. South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster said the CSX freight train was on a loading side track "where it was supposed to be" before the collision and the Amtrak train was "on the wrong side." He did not elaborate.
•
👉📰
#repost  #cbsnews  At least two people were killed and 116 others injured when a train traveling from New York to Miami struck a freight train Sunday morning, authorities said. The crash left thousands of gallons of oil spilled at the scene near Columbia, South Carolina. • The collision occurred in Cayce around 2:45 a.m. Sunday, Lexington County spokesperson Harrison Cahill said. He said the injuries ranged from scratches to broken bones. The two victims were later identified as Amtrak personnel. Lexington County Coroner Margaret Fisher said 54-year-old engineer Michael Kempf and 32-year-old conductor Michael Sella were killed in the collision. • There were approximately 148 people aboard the Amtrak Train 91, including 139 passengers and eight crew members. South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster said the CSX freight train was on a loading side track "where it was supposed to be" before the collision and the Amtrak train was "on the wrong side." He did not elaborate. • 👉📰
#repost #washingtonpost
It’s not always easy to find work.
Just ask Ryder — he was apparently laid off from his job at a restaurant chain in Michigan. So the state approved him for $360 per week in unemployment benefits.
Just one problem: He’s a German shepherd.
“So my dog Ryder gets approved for unemployment benefits of 360 per week,” Ryder’s owner, Michael Haddock, wrote on Facebook, according to ABC affiliate WZZM.
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Haddock, an attorney in Saugatuck, Mich., told WZZM that he received a letter last weekend from the State of Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency addressed to his dog — sort of.
It was sent to “Michael Ryder.”
“My name is Michael; my dog is Ryder,” Haddock told the station. “I was surprised to see it, but I had a good laugh, actually.”
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“Due to criminals stealing data from a number of different places — Equifax, other places where this has happened over the last few years — criminals are now using that information to file for unemployment benefits, and the IRS is running into the same problem with tax refunds. That’s how this starts,” Michigan UIA spokesman Chris DeWitt told WWJ Newsradio 950.
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The Oakland County Sheriff’s Office confirmed to The Post that someone named Michael Ryder filed a police report Wednesday claiming possible identity theft.
The letter from Michigan UIA stated that Michael Ryder had worked for Kruse and Muer, an upscale seafood restaurant chain in Michigan. He was approved for 20 weeks of unemployment benefits at $360 per week, it stated.
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Haddock said he called UIA to sort it out. “I felt like back in school when I would tell the teacher that the dog ate my assignment,” he told WZZM. “I don’t think the risk management person really believed what I was telling her, and she just asked me to scan the document and send it to her.”
Ultimately, the claim was denied, and Michigan UIA said it is now investigating the incident.
•
“Unfortunately, Michael Ryder’s claim will not be allowed,” Tim Kolar, state administrator of investigations with the UIA, said in a statement to WZZM. “I know first-hand it is rare for ‘man’s best friend’ to contribute financially to the household and that will continue in this instance.”
#repost  #washingtonpost  It’s not always easy to find work. Just ask Ryder — he was apparently laid off from his job at a restaurant chain in Michigan. So the state approved him for $360 per week in unemployment benefits. Just one problem: He’s a German shepherd. “So my dog Ryder gets approved for unemployment benefits of 360 per week,” Ryder’s owner, Michael Haddock, wrote on Facebook, according to ABC affiliate WZZM. • Haddock, an attorney in Saugatuck, Mich., told WZZM that he received a letter last weekend from the State of Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency addressed to his dog — sort of. It was sent to “Michael Ryder.” “My name is Michael; my dog is Ryder,” Haddock told the station. “I was surprised to see it, but I had a good laugh, actually.” • “Due to criminals stealing data from a number of different places — Equifax, other places where this has happened over the last few years — criminals are now using that information to file for unemployment benefits, and the IRS is running into the same problem with tax refunds. That’s how this starts,” Michigan UIA spokesman Chris DeWitt told WWJ Newsradio 950. • The Oakland County Sheriff’s Office confirmed to The Post that someone named Michael Ryder filed a police report Wednesday claiming possible identity theft. The letter from Michigan UIA stated that Michael Ryder had worked for Kruse and Muer, an upscale seafood restaurant chain in Michigan. He was approved for 20 weeks of unemployment benefits at $360 per week, it stated. • Haddock said he called UIA to sort it out. “I felt like back in school when I would tell the teacher that the dog ate my assignment,” he told WZZM. “I don’t think the risk management person really believed what I was telling her, and she just asked me to scan the document and send it to her.” Ultimately, the claim was denied, and Michigan UIA said it is now investigating the incident. • “Unfortunately, Michael Ryder’s claim will not be allowed,” Tim Kolar, state administrator of investigations with the UIA, said in a statement to WZZM. “I know first-hand it is rare for ‘man’s best friend’ to contribute financially to the household and that will continue in this instance.”
#repost #cnn
In Cape Town, South Africa, they're calling it "Day Zero" -- the day when the taps run dry.
City officials had recently said that day would come on April 22. They have since moved up the date to April 12. Cape Town is South Africa's second-largest city and a top international tourist draw.
Now, residents play a new and delicate game of water math each day. They're recycling bath water to help flush toilets. They're being told to limit showers to 90 seconds. And hand sanitizer, once somewhat of an afterthought, is now a big seller. "Unwashed hair is now a sign of social responsibility," said resident Darryn Ten. •
So how did this happen? How does a major city in the developed world just run dry?
It's been a slow-motion crisis, exacerbated by three factors: * The worst drought in more than a century, which has pushed Cape Town's water scarcity into a potentially deadly horizon
* The metro area's population, which is 4 million and growing quickly.
* A rapidly changing climate. •
Even with the predicament they find themselves in, residents haven't dropped their water use significantly, Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille said. The city has lowered the water pressure in its mains to help stretch the water supply. But usage is still 86 million liters above its target goal.
"It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero," a statement from the mayor's office said. "We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them."
Starting February 1, residents will only be allowed to use 50 liters, or a little over 13 gallons, of water per person, per day.
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Many residents are reusing bucket water, such as Anne Verbist, who recycles her tap water to tend to her plants.
"We catch all water from the tap to wash hands and dishes and use it for the plants," she said.
"It is eye-opening, and an indication of the panic and also what lies ahead," she said.
"It's been a hard transition because a lot of Capetonians aren't understanding how we got to this point when the municipality was well-informed that we would experience a drought," Mzwakali said.
#repost  #cnn  In Cape Town, South Africa, they're calling it "Day Zero" -- the day when the taps run dry. City officials had recently said that day would come on April 22. They have since moved up the date to April 12. Cape Town is South Africa's second-largest city and a top international tourist draw. Now, residents play a new and delicate game of water math each day. They're recycling bath water to help flush toilets. They're being told to limit showers to 90 seconds. And hand sanitizer, once somewhat of an afterthought, is now a big seller. "Unwashed hair is now a sign of social responsibility," said resident Darryn Ten. • So how did this happen? How does a major city in the developed world just run dry? It's been a slow-motion crisis, exacerbated by three factors: * The worst drought in more than a century, which has pushed Cape Town's water scarcity into a potentially deadly horizon * The metro area's population, which is 4 million and growing quickly. * A rapidly changing climate. • Even with the predicament they find themselves in, residents haven't dropped their water use significantly, Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille said. The city has lowered the water pressure in its mains to help stretch the water supply. But usage is still 86 million liters above its target goal. "It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero," a statement from the mayor's office said. "We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them." Starting February 1, residents will only be allowed to use 50 liters, or a little over 13 gallons, of water per person, per day. • Many residents are reusing bucket water, such as Anne Verbist, who recycles her tap water to tend to her plants. "We catch all water from the tap to wash hands and dishes and use it for the plants," she said. "It is eye-opening, and an indication of the panic and also what lies ahead," she said. "It's been a hard transition because a lot of Capetonians aren't understanding how we got to this point when the municipality was well-informed that we would experience a drought," Mzwakali said.
#repost #nytimes #espn
On Wednesday, Rachael Denhollander, a 32-year-old attorney and mother of three who in September 2016 was the first woman to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual assault, delivered the final impact statement. Many of the people who went before her cited Denhollander's bravery in coming forward as the reason why they appeared in court this week. She asked Aquilina and the court repeatedly: "What is a little girl worth?"
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Denhollander detailed her path to the Lansing courtroom, which included law school and meticulously compiling a file so police would take her claims seriously before she filed the first report in the case more than a year ago. She criticized Michigan State for long ignoring calls for help about Nassar and for the response from the university's leaders since her accusations became public. She said she pities Nassar for losing the ability to determine between good and evil.
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"You could have had everything you pretended to be," she said. "Every woman who stood up here truly loved you as a child -- real, genuine love."
•
👉📰
#repost  #nytimes  #espn  On Wednesday, Rachael Denhollander, a 32-year-old attorney and mother of three who in September 2016 was the first woman to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual assault, delivered the final impact statement. Many of the people who went before her cited Denhollander's bravery in coming forward as the reason why they appeared in court this week. She asked Aquilina and the court repeatedly: "What is a little girl worth?" • Denhollander detailed her path to the Lansing courtroom, which included law school and meticulously compiling a file so police would take her claims seriously before she filed the first report in the case more than a year ago. She criticized Michigan State for long ignoring calls for help about Nassar and for the response from the university's leaders since her accusations became public. She said she pities Nassar for losing the ability to determine between good and evil. • "You could have had everything you pretended to be," she said. "Every woman who stood up here truly loved you as a child -- real, genuine love." • 👉📰
#repost #nytimes #espn
A total of 156 people, which included women, girls and their parents, provided impact statements during seven days of the sentencing hearing in Lansing. Roughly two dozen more submitted written statements that weren't read aloud in court. Along with recounting their experiences with Nassar and telling him that they planned to take their power back from him, many who gave statements criticized Michigan State and USA Gymnastics for ignoring complaints about the disgraced doctor for nearly two decades.
•
👉📰
#repost  #nytimes  #espn  A total of 156 people, which included women, girls and their parents, provided impact statements during seven days of the sentencing hearing in Lansing. Roughly two dozen more submitted written statements that weren't read aloud in court. Along with recounting their experiences with Nassar and telling him that they planned to take their power back from him, many who gave statements criticized Michigan State and USA Gymnastics for ignoring complaints about the disgraced doctor for nearly two decades. • 👉📰
#repost #nytimes
After an extraordinary seven-day hearing that drew more than 150 young women to speak out publicly about sexual abuse they said was committed by Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar, the former team doctor for the American gymnastics team, a judge sentenced him on Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison.
He had faced a minimum term of 25 to 40 years.
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Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who had opened her courtroom to all the young women who wanted to address Dr. Nassar directly, and forced him to listen when he pleaded to make it stop, handed down the sentence, saying to him, “You’ve done nothing to deserve to walk outside a prison again. It is my honor and privilege to sentence you,” she said, and noting the length of the sentence, added, “I just signed your death warrant.”
•
Given an opportunity to address the court before sentencing, Dr. Nassar apologized and, occasionally turning to the young women in the courtroom, said: “Your words these past several days have had a significant effect on myself and have shaken me to my core. I will carry your words with me for the rest of my days.” Several women sobbed in the gallery as he spoke.
#repost  #nytimes  After an extraordinary seven-day hearing that drew more than 150 young women to speak out publicly about sexual abuse they said was committed by Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar, the former team doctor for the American gymnastics team, a judge sentenced him on Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison. He had faced a minimum term of 25 to 40 years. • Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who had opened her courtroom to all the young women who wanted to address Dr. Nassar directly, and forced him to listen when he pleaded to make it stop, handed down the sentence, saying to him, “You’ve done nothing to deserve to walk outside a prison again. It is my honor and privilege to sentence you,” she said, and noting the length of the sentence, added, “I just signed your death warrant.” • Given an opportunity to address the court before sentencing, Dr. Nassar apologized and, occasionally turning to the young women in the courtroom, said: “Your words these past several days have had a significant effect on myself and have shaken me to my core. I will carry your words with me for the rest of my days.” Several women sobbed in the gallery as he spoke.
A nondescript, burnt orange house in Southern California — similar to many others on the same street — turned out to be a prison for 13 siblings. Now questions abound over why the Turpin children were allegedly held captive by their parents — and how no one else seemed to know.
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A 17-year-old escaped through a window
If not for a daring bolt by a 17-year-old girl, she and her siblings might still be trapped.
The teen "appeared to be only 10 years old and slightly emaciated," the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said. Using a cell phone she grabbed from the house, the girl tipped authorities off to a gruesome scene.
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Some children were chained to their beds
When authorities arrived at the four-bedroom house in Perris, they found someof the children shackled with chains and padlocks, the sheriff's department said. Conditions inside the house were filthy, as were the siblings. They "appeared malnourished and very dirty," authorities said. The 13 siblings range in age from 2 to 29 — but the seven adults were so emaciated they looked like children.
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The parents have been charged 
David and Louise Turpin are charged with torture and child endangerment. Bail was set at $9 million each. Riverside County sheriff's deputies had not had previous contact with the couple, Capt. Greg Fellows said. Child protective services had not been called to the home in the past, officials said.
•
The children were apparently home-schooled 
The father, David Turpin, ran a private school out of his home called Sandcastle Day School, according to the California Department of Education. Turpin is listed as both the administrator and principal.
•
They looked happy in vacation photos
Perhaps the oddest juxtaposition in this case is the cheerful family photos contrasted with the apparent horror of their home life.
One photo, taken at the parents' wedding vow renewal in Las Vegas, showed a dozen beaming siblings and a baby, with all the boys wearing identical suits and the girls in matching dresses. #repost #cnn
A nondescript, burnt orange house in Southern California — similar to many others on the same street — turned out to be a prison for 13 siblings. Now questions abound over why the Turpin children were allegedly held captive by their parents — and how no one else seemed to know. • A 17-year-old escaped through a window If not for a daring bolt by a 17-year-old girl, she and her siblings might still be trapped. The teen "appeared to be only 10 years old and slightly emaciated," the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said. Using a cell phone she grabbed from the house, the girl tipped authorities off to a gruesome scene. • Some children were chained to their beds When authorities arrived at the four-bedroom house in Perris, they found someof the children shackled with chains and padlocks, the sheriff's department said. Conditions inside the house were filthy, as were the siblings. They "appeared malnourished and very dirty," authorities said. The 13 siblings range in age from 2 to 29 — but the seven adults were so emaciated they looked like children. • The parents have been charged David and Louise Turpin are charged with torture and child endangerment. Bail was set at $9 million each. Riverside County sheriff's deputies had not had previous contact with the couple, Capt. Greg Fellows said. Child protective services had not been called to the home in the past, officials said. • The children were apparently home-schooled The father, David Turpin, ran a private school out of his home called Sandcastle Day School, according to the California Department of Education. Turpin is listed as both the administrator and principal. • They looked happy in vacation photos Perhaps the oddest juxtaposition in this case is the cheerful family photos contrasted with the apparent horror of their home life. One photo, taken at the parents' wedding vow renewal in Las Vegas, showed a dozen beaming siblings and a baby, with all the boys wearing identical suits and the girls in matching dresses. #repost  #cnn 
In the story, Stephanie Clifford, whose professional name is Stormy Daniels, is described as having “worked out an agreement for the presidential candidate to pay her a six-figure sum to keep quiet.” This document would have shielded the names of the parties involved, the Slate article added.
•
“Daniels said she was talking to me and sharing these details because Trump was stalling on finalizing the confidentiality agreement and paying her,” Weisberg wrote. “Given her experience with Trump, she suspected he would stall her until after the election, and then refuse to sign or pay up.”
Clifford suggested that she was keeping to herself some tabloid-ready details “that only someone who had seen him naked would know,” Weisberg wrote.
•
Daniels was paid $130,000 by a lawyer for Donald Trump in the weeks before the 2016 election to not talk publicly about a sexual relationship with the then-Republican candidate, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.
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The lawyer, Michael Cohen, allegedly paid Stephanie Clifford to remain silent about an encounter at Lake Tahoe in 2006, a year after Trump married his third wife, Melania, according to the Journal. The Journal said the payment was made to a client-trust account at City National Bank in Los Angeles. #repost #washingtonpost
In the story, Stephanie Clifford, whose professional name is Stormy Daniels, is described as having “worked out an agreement for the presidential candidate to pay her a six-figure sum to keep quiet.” This document would have shielded the names of the parties involved, the Slate article added. • “Daniels said she was talking to me and sharing these details because Trump was stalling on finalizing the confidentiality agreement and paying her,” Weisberg wrote. “Given her experience with Trump, she suspected he would stall her until after the election, and then refuse to sign or pay up.” Clifford suggested that she was keeping to herself some tabloid-ready details “that only someone who had seen him naked would know,” Weisberg wrote. • Daniels was paid $130,000 by a lawyer for Donald Trump in the weeks before the 2016 election to not talk publicly about a sexual relationship with the then-Republican candidate, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. • The lawyer, Michael Cohen, allegedly paid Stephanie Clifford to remain silent about an encounter at Lake Tahoe in 2006, a year after Trump married his third wife, Melania, according to the Journal. The Journal said the payment was made to a client-trust account at City National Bank in Los Angeles. #repost  #washingtonpost 
Five women have accused James Franco of inappropriate or sexually exploitative behavior, including two women who lambasted the actor on Twitter after he won a Golden Globe, according to a report published Thursday.
Franco, 39, has been dogged by allegations, rumors and innuendo in the wake of Sunday's ceremony, during which he wore a lapel pin honoring the fight against sexual misconduct. He has denied sexual impropriety, telling Stephen Colbert on Tuesday that claims on Twitter were "not accurate."
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Four women who spoke to The Los Angeles Times were students at Studio 4, a film school Franco founded in 2014. The fifth said he was her mentor. In some cases, the newspaper reported, the women believed the prolific star, well-known in Hollywood for his intense work ethic and eclectic side-projects, could advance their careers.
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In response to questions about the Los Angeles Times story, a representative for Franco pointed out statements from his appearance Tuesday on CBS' "The Late Show" in which the actor said: "In my life, I pride myself in taking responsibility for things I’ve done. I completely support people coming out and being able to have a voice because they haven’t had a voice for so long. I don’t want to shut them down in any way. It’s a good thing I support." #repost #nbcnews
Five women have accused James Franco of inappropriate or sexually exploitative behavior, including two women who lambasted the actor on Twitter after he won a Golden Globe, according to a report published Thursday. Franco, 39, has been dogged by allegations, rumors and innuendo in the wake of Sunday's ceremony, during which he wore a lapel pin honoring the fight against sexual misconduct. He has denied sexual impropriety, telling Stephen Colbert on Tuesday that claims on Twitter were "not accurate." • Four women who spoke to The Los Angeles Times were students at Studio 4, a film school Franco founded in 2014. The fifth said he was her mentor. In some cases, the newspaper reported, the women believed the prolific star, well-known in Hollywood for his intense work ethic and eclectic side-projects, could advance their careers. • In response to questions about the Los Angeles Times story, a representative for Franco pointed out statements from his appearance Tuesday on CBS' "The Late Show" in which the actor said: "In my life, I pride myself in taking responsibility for things I’ve done. I completely support people coming out and being able to have a voice because they haven’t had a voice for so long. I don’t want to shut them down in any way. It’s a good thing I support." #repost  #nbcnews 
They’re tiny, colorful and harmless-looking, but these little pellets are being blamed for causing big problems for the world’s oceans and seas. The items in question are plastic microbeads, and on Tuesday, Britain made good on a pledge to ban the manufacturing of personal care products containing them.
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Microbeads are itty-bitty plastic orbs that can be found in exfoliating facial scrubs, shower gels and toothpaste, among other products. They are part of a larger class of microplastics, or pieces of plastic less than five millimeters, or 0.2 inch, long. (Roughly the size of a grain of rice.) #repost #nytimes
They’re tiny, colorful and harmless-looking, but these little pellets are being blamed for causing big problems for the world’s oceans and seas. The items in question are plastic microbeads, and on Tuesday, Britain made good on a pledge to ban the manufacturing of personal care products containing them. • Microbeads are itty-bitty plastic orbs that can be found in exfoliating facial scrubs, shower gels and toothpaste, among other products. They are part of a larger class of microplastics, or pieces of plastic less than five millimeters, or 0.2 inch, long. (Roughly the size of a grain of rice.) #repost  #nytimes