an online Instagram web viewer
  • srwhmg
    Arizona Salt River Wild Horses
    @srwhmg

Images by srwhmg

They belong to mother nature, they belong to the wind, they belong to the river, they belong to all of us. 
Click love if u love them. SRWHMG.
Go to our Facebook page to view the video.
They belong to mother nature, they belong to the wind, they belong to the river, they belong to all of us. Click love if u love them. SRWHMG. Go to our Facebook page to view the video.
SRWHMG official statement in regards to stray horses. 
When people find stray or abandoned horses, anywhere in Arizona, these horses have to be picked up, held for seven days, and sold at auction by AZDA, (Arizona Department of Agriculture), even if the finder or a horse rescue is interested in keeping the horse(s). This is not the fault of the AZDA, it is Arizona law. 
We were confronted with this last year, when we found Cochise abandoned in the Tonto National Forest; he had to be picked up, went to the auction, where we then bought him back. (He has severe arthritis and is now living happily ever after with some pain management at our facility in Prescott.) But not all stray or abandoned horses are so lucky. 
This stray livestock law the way it is, does not encourage the best outcome for stray horses as they can end up in Mexican horse slaughter plants, because horse traders and kill buyers frequent those auctions. We are going to try to amend this law through State legislation, to include a first right of refusal to horse rescues and good homes, but it will be a long and arduous process.

In the mean time, because we strive to make a positive difference for any horse or animal that crosses our path, we have been discussing this issue with the Ag department (AZDA), whom we now work with on a daily basis. They were willing to work with us towards a good outcome for our most recent stray livestock horses found on the TNF. (We named them John and Wayne.) They (the AZDA) were willing to look at internal ways to be able to work with any horse rescues and finders of stray horses in Arizona. The stray livestock law does not specify where the livestock auction has to be held, therefore, auctions for stray horses could take place at the finders place or a horse rescue, as long as they sign up as a W9 vendor for the State. We think this makes for a GREAT solution and encourages a good home for the horses. 
So we were going to purchase John and Wayne (the stray horses in question) and after fixing them up, adopt them out to a good home, together. Our adoption contract contains a clause that prevents the further selling of the horse(s). If the adopter wants
SRWHMG official statement in regards to stray horses. When people find stray or abandoned horses, anywhere in Arizona, these horses have to be picked up, held for seven days, and sold at auction by AZDA, (Arizona Department of Agriculture), even if the finder or a horse rescue is interested in keeping the horse(s). This is not the fault of the AZDA, it is Arizona law. We were confronted with this last year, when we found Cochise abandoned in the Tonto National Forest; he had to be picked up, went to the auction, where we then bought him back. (He has severe arthritis and is now living happily ever after with some pain management at our facility in Prescott.) But not all stray or abandoned horses are so lucky. This stray livestock law the way it is, does not encourage the best outcome for stray horses as they can end up in Mexican horse slaughter plants, because horse traders and kill buyers frequent those auctions. We are going to try to amend this law through State legislation, to include a first right of refusal to horse rescues and good homes, but it will be a long and arduous process. In the mean time, because we strive to make a positive difference for any horse or animal that crosses our path, we have been discussing this issue with the Ag department (AZDA), whom we now work with on a daily basis. They were willing to work with us towards a good outcome for our most recent stray livestock horses found on the TNF. (We named them John and Wayne.) They (the AZDA) were willing to look at internal ways to be able to work with any horse rescues and finders of stray horses in Arizona. The stray livestock law does not specify where the livestock auction has to be held, therefore, auctions for stray horses could take place at the finders place or a horse rescue, as long as they sign up as a W9 vendor for the State. We think this makes for a GREAT solution and encourages a good home for the horses. So we were going to purchase John and Wayne (the stray horses in question) and after fixing them up, adopt them out to a good home, together. Our adoption contract contains a clause that prevents the further selling of the horse(s). If the adopter wants
Attention local supporters! 
The Culvers on Southern and Crismon in Mesa is having a fundraiser for us this entire week through October 7th! 
Go have a some icecream and a meal to help the horses! All you have to do is mention that you want your bill to go towards Salt River Wild Horse Management Group! How great is that! 
Thank you Culvers!! Thank you local supporters, see you there!
Attention local supporters! The Culvers on Southern and Crismon in Mesa is having a fundraiser for us this entire week through October 7th! Go have a some icecream and a meal to help the horses! All you have to do is mention that you want your bill to go towards Salt River Wild Horse Management Group! How great is that! Thank you Culvers!! Thank you local supporters, see you there!
Thank you everyone who shops at Fry's and has picked SRWHMG as your charity! With one click on the  Fry's website, you help make a difference all year, and it doesn't cost anything extra! Our goal is to get to 300 households! Please spread the word to your friends and neighbors about how easy it is to support wild horses while shopping! Thank you! https://www.frysfood.com/topic/new-community-rewards-program
Thank you everyone who shops at Fry's and has picked SRWHMG as your charity! With one click on the Fry's website, you help make a difference all year, and it doesn't cost anything extra! Our goal is to get to 300 households! Please spread the word to your friends and neighbors about how easy it is to support wild horses while shopping! Thank you! https://www.frysfood.com/topic/new-community-rewards-program
About 15% of the Salt River wild  horses have the grey factor. This means that they can be anything from dark grey, dappled, light grey or white. 
However, even when they appear completely white, they are still called a grey, because their skin underneath is black. They are only a "white" horse, if the skin underneath is pink. We have no whites on the river, we have only greys. 
Snow's mother Snow White (who died from mesquite bean colic) was the whitest mare on the river, eventhough she was a grey. ( lol, confused yet? )
Grey horses are never born grey, but gradually turn that way over time. The way you can tell if they are going to grey out is by their "goggles". A grey always has at least one parent with the grey factor. Snow's Sire is a bay color. (exactly the color Snow is right now!)
Snow is now 2 and a half months old and is very slowly starting to show some grey hairs. By the time he greys out, (at approximately 4 or 5 yrs) his name will make a lot more sense, we promise!
SRWHMG.
About 15% of the Salt River wild horses have the grey factor. This means that they can be anything from dark grey, dappled, light grey or white. However, even when they appear completely white, they are still called a grey, because their skin underneath is black. They are only a "white" horse, if the skin underneath is pink. We have no whites on the river, we have only greys. Snow's mother Snow White (who died from mesquite bean colic) was the whitest mare on the river, eventhough she was a grey. ( lol, confused yet? ) Grey horses are never born grey, but gradually turn that way over time. The way you can tell if they are going to grey out is by their "goggles". A grey always has at least one parent with the grey factor. Snow's Sire is a bay color. (exactly the color Snow is right now!) Snow is now 2 and a half months old and is very slowly starting to show some grey hairs. By the time he greys out, (at approximately 4 or 5 yrs) his name will make a lot more sense, we promise! SRWHMG.
Now back to our regular programming..
It's a beautiful foggy morning on the lower Salt River. First day of fall. The horses are enjoying their breakfast of river eelgrass. 
Photo by SRWHMG photographer David Madison.
Now back to our regular programming.. It's a beautiful foggy morning on the lower Salt River. First day of fall. The horses are enjoying their breakfast of river eelgrass. Photo by SRWHMG photographer David Madison.
We had to rescue yet ANOTHER dumped horse in the Tonto National Forest! SERIOUSLY! 
This one is a gelding as well and a little younger than the other one, approximately 16 to18 yrs and the paint looks to be approximately 18 to 20. Both appear healthy and not lame. After getting him safe as well, it was awefully suspicious how happy these two horses were to see eachother!
If anyone knows these horses or has seen them in someone's yard, we sure would love to find out who the person is who  a. starved these horses and b. left them to die in the desert. 
This sweet boy, much like the other, could not wait to get in the trailer; he wanted a bath, a good dinner and a safe place to sleep. 
That was quickly provided by our friends and volunteers Mike and Shannon of AZtrailriding.com! 
Our AZ Department of Agriculture helped transport this guy and is  working with us so that these boys will NOT have to be taken to the auction site in Buckeye! Thank you AZDA! (We told you, they are fantastic) 
We are going to make very sure that they will end up in a wonderful forever home, TOGETHER. 
Thank you for your support.
We had to rescue yet ANOTHER dumped horse in the Tonto National Forest! SERIOUSLY! This one is a gelding as well and a little younger than the other one, approximately 16 to18 yrs and the paint looks to be approximately 18 to 20. Both appear healthy and not lame. After getting him safe as well, it was awefully suspicious how happy these two horses were to see eachother! If anyone knows these horses or has seen them in someone's yard, we sure would love to find out who the person is who a. starved these horses and b. left them to die in the desert. This sweet boy, much like the other, could not wait to get in the trailer; he wanted a bath, a good dinner and a safe place to sleep. That was quickly provided by our friends and volunteers Mike and Shannon of AZtrailriding.com! Our AZ Department of Agriculture helped transport this guy and is working with us so that these boys will NOT have to be taken to the auction site in Buckeye! Thank you AZDA! (We told you, they are fantastic) We are going to make very sure that they will end up in a wonderful forever home, TOGETHER. Thank you for your support.
Sometimes it takes a village, sometimes it takes a whole State, sometimes it takes a community, but all times it takes people working together. 
We want to thank caller Tony Thompson for immediately knowing to call our hotline when seeing this stray horse! (*We confirmed there were two different calls/alerts in regards to him) 
Thank you to all of our volunteers that do Bush hwy patrol,  and in particular volunteer Jake who kept him there and gave him water. Thank you volunteers Karen and Suzanne and thank you volunteers Shannon Lorrance and Mike McFadden for coming to the rescue and picking this boy up and giving him a temporary place to stay at AZtrailriding.com! 
He will stay there until we can work out solutions with our Agriculture Department on what to do next. (Please do not worry, like we said earlier, our Arizona Ag Department is fantastic.) If this seems deja vu, it is because this paint looks a LOT like Cochise, whom we bought back at the auction and now lives at our facility in Prescott! 
As always, we will keep you informed. Thank you for your support. Please click share and rate us 5 stars on fb if you like our work!
Sometimes it takes a village, sometimes it takes a whole State, sometimes it takes a community, but all times it takes people working together. We want to thank caller Tony Thompson for immediately knowing to call our hotline when seeing this stray horse! (*We confirmed there were two different calls/alerts in regards to him) Thank you to all of our volunteers that do Bush hwy patrol, and in particular volunteer Jake who kept him there and gave him water. Thank you volunteers Karen and Suzanne and thank you volunteers Shannon Lorrance and Mike McFadden for coming to the rescue and picking this boy up and giving him a temporary place to stay at AZtrailriding.com! He will stay there until we can work out solutions with our Agriculture Department on what to do next. (Please do not worry, like we said earlier, our Arizona Ag Department is fantastic.) If this seems deja vu, it is because this paint looks a LOT like Cochise, whom we bought back at the auction and now lives at our facility in Prescott! As always, we will keep you informed. Thank you for your support. Please click share and rate us 5 stars on fb if you like our work!
Happy endings; Nakota and Old Lady part 1.
This sweet old gray mare had lived her whole life free on the river, and had survived at least 20 years of natures challenges, hence her name "Old Lady". But this last spring, the drought would have killed her, had we not stepped in and rescued both her and her filly. 
She was in emaciated condition and her filly Lolly, at only a week old, had a broken left phalanx.  We tried very hard for both of them, but unfortunately Lolly's break collapsed on itself and she had to be euthanized humanely.
It is always heartbreaking when a mare loses her foal and vice versa, because their bond is undeniable. 
The foal in this video, Nakota, was also rescued together with her mother Cheyenne, as Cheyenne had severed a fetlock tendon in the wild, and became immobile. The fate of this pair would have been equally harsh, would we not have stepped in. 
Again, we gave it our all for both of them and we were able to extend Cheyenne's life for another 2 months just for Nakota. But at a certain point, it was time for Cheyenne to go and have peace, and we laid her to rest,  promising her that Nakota would be ok. 
So then we had two heartbroken souls at our facility. It didnt take us long to think of a solution, and it didnt take them long to decide that it was a good idea. Slowly and carefully we let them spend more and more time together and they learned to find comfort in eachother. Now they are inseparable. They are most definitely saving eachother. 
We can continue to work toward these happy endings only with your financial support. These two sweet souls still need sponsors for their monthly needs, so that they can live happily ever after on our property. To learn more, please go to our website www.srwhmg.org and click sponsor a horse, and find Old Lady and Nakota. Stay tuned for part 2!
Happy endings; Nakota and Old Lady part 1. This sweet old gray mare had lived her whole life free on the river, and had survived at least 20 years of natures challenges, hence her name "Old Lady". But this last spring, the drought would have killed her, had we not stepped in and rescued both her and her filly. She was in emaciated condition and her filly Lolly, at only a week old, had a broken left phalanx. We tried very hard for both of them, but unfortunately Lolly's break collapsed on itself and she had to be euthanized humanely. It is always heartbreaking when a mare loses her foal and vice versa, because their bond is undeniable. The foal in this video, Nakota, was also rescued together with her mother Cheyenne, as Cheyenne had severed a fetlock tendon in the wild, and became immobile. The fate of this pair would have been equally harsh, would we not have stepped in. Again, we gave it our all for both of them and we were able to extend Cheyenne's life for another 2 months just for Nakota. But at a certain point, it was time for Cheyenne to go and have peace, and we laid her to rest, promising her that Nakota would be ok. So then we had two heartbroken souls at our facility. It didnt take us long to think of a solution, and it didnt take them long to decide that it was a good idea. Slowly and carefully we let them spend more and more time together and they learned to find comfort in eachother. Now they are inseparable. They are most definitely saving eachother. We can continue to work toward these happy endings only with your financial support. These two sweet souls still need sponsors for their monthly needs, so that they can live happily ever after on our property. To learn more, please go to our website www.srwhmg.org and click sponsor a horse, and find Old Lady and Nakota. Stay tuned for part 2!
The Corolla wild horses are a herd of historic wild horses who live on the outer banks of North Carolina in Currituck County. With hurricane Florence creeping closer, our thoughts are with them tonight. Much like our situation, these horses were saved by legislation and are humanely managed by a non profit organisation, the Corolla Wild Horse Fund. They also have a rescue facility where they take care of 18 of their rescued wild horses. We have been keeping an eye on how they are doing and they are so far so good. The hardy ponies are expected to be ok, but our thoughts will be with them and we will keep you informed. We love that the media is showing concern for these wild horses with national coverage. It is a great example of concern the public has for the well being of all of our American icons.
The Corolla wild horses are a herd of historic wild horses who live on the outer banks of North Carolina in Currituck County. With hurricane Florence creeping closer, our thoughts are with them tonight. Much like our situation, these horses were saved by legislation and are humanely managed by a non profit organisation, the Corolla Wild Horse Fund. They also have a rescue facility where they take care of 18 of their rescued wild horses. We have been keeping an eye on how they are doing and they are so far so good. The hardy ponies are expected to be ok, but our thoughts will be with them and we will keep you informed. We love that the media is showing concern for these wild horses with national coverage. It is a great example of concern the public has for the well being of all of our American icons.
STAND WITH WILD HORSES EVERYWHERE TODAY. 
All of our supporters are incredibly good at contacting legislators. Today we ask you to give your voices to all BLM managed wild horses by calling congress. Congress will begin discussions to finalize Fiscal Year 2019 Appropriations Legislation today. The committee will reconcile differences in the House and Senate versions of these spending bills.

If the House version is passed, it would authorize the BLM to seperate wild horses and burros in non-reproducing and single-sex herds and subject them to risky, invasive surgeries.  It could mean the beginning of the end for the iconic, free-roaming mustang herds of the American West. 
We implore our own Arizona legislators to not let Congress undermine over 50 years of wild free-roaming horse and burro protection. Please, take action today! 
STAMPEDE congress. Call Your Congressmen and Senators at 202-224-3121. Ask for the legislative aid who goes about wild horse issues. Here’s tips on what to say: “I’m [name] and I’m a constituent. Please ask Rep./ Senator [Name] to contact the Appropriations conference committee to urge them to reject the Stewart Amendment calling for the mass sterilization of wild horses and burros. This would undermine 50 years of protection and is counter to the wishes of the 80 percent of Americans who want our wild horses protected and humanely managed by pzp humane birth control instead.  Thank you.” Then, send a follow up email to your elected officials on Capitol Hill —> wildhor.se/2Offo9w

Thank you to our coalition partner the American Wild Horse Campaign for standing strong in Washington DC. We support them 100%.
STAND WITH WILD HORSES EVERYWHERE TODAY. All of our supporters are incredibly good at contacting legislators. Today we ask you to give your voices to all BLM managed wild horses by calling congress. Congress will begin discussions to finalize Fiscal Year 2019 Appropriations Legislation today. The committee will reconcile differences in the House and Senate versions of these spending bills. If the House version is passed, it would authorize the BLM to seperate wild horses and burros in non-reproducing and single-sex herds and subject them to risky, invasive surgeries. It could mean the beginning of the end for the iconic, free-roaming mustang herds of the American West. We implore our own Arizona legislators to not let Congress undermine over 50 years of wild free-roaming horse and burro protection. Please, take action today! STAMPEDE congress. Call Your Congressmen and Senators at 202-224-3121. Ask for the legislative aid who goes about wild horse issues. Here’s tips on what to say: “I’m [name] and I’m a constituent. Please ask Rep./ Senator [Name] to contact the Appropriations conference committee to urge them to reject the Stewart Amendment calling for the mass sterilization of wild horses and burros. This would undermine 50 years of protection and is counter to the wishes of the 80 percent of Americans who want our wild horses protected and humanely managed by pzp humane birth control instead. Thank you.” Then, send a follow up email to your elected officials on Capitol Hill —> wildhor.se/2Offo9w Thank you to our coalition partner the American Wild Horse Campaign for standing strong in Washington DC. We support them 100%.
Did you know that we also have a page where you can share your own pictures and experiences with the Salt River wild horses, and interact with others who enjoy coming to the Salt River? It is a wonderful interactive community and has almost reached 8000 members! To visit the page  here is the link to request to enter! Enjoy!  https://www.facebook.com/groups/152187765122492/
Did you know that we also have a page where you can share your own pictures and experiences with the Salt River wild horses, and interact with others who enjoy coming to the Salt River? It is a wonderful interactive community and has almost reached 8000 members! To visit the page here is the link to request to enter! Enjoy! https://www.facebook.com/groups/152187765122492/
These Salt River Wild Rescued boys absolutely  LOVE each other.. this is Snow and Gideon.  They each have their own milk bowls, but they like to eat together.. ♡ 
Would you like to become a sponsor?  The clickable link is in our bio. ♡
These Salt River Wild Rescued boys absolutely LOVE each other.. this is Snow and Gideon. They each have their own milk bowls, but they like to eat together.. ♡ Would you like to become a sponsor? The clickable link is in our bio. ♡
LABOR of love....🐴💕
Our volunteers do much more than rescue injured Salt River wild horses...For example... A regular day for us starts at 5 am 🕔  with opening of the Forest Service gate at first  light. We then patrol all areas where horses are, we warn traffic 🚗  when horses are crossing, we educate the public, we monitor and assess injuries, we record changes and new births 📝, we reunite horses, we relocate horses🐎, we clean recreation areas  from manure and garbage 🗑 we clean firepits, we douse fires 🔥, we clean grafiti, we answer our hotline and respond to any horse emergency 🚑, we mend and install fencing 🛠, we drag horse carcasses, we rescue any animal abandoned in the forest, (🐈🐖🐇🐔🐕), we close hikers gates, we take care of rescued Salt River wild horses at our facilities 🥕, we communicate with authorities and we continuously fight for improvements in the horses' habitat, 👩‍💻etc etc. 
At the end of the day, our feed team hauls bales of hay to the feed stations and at sundown we close the FS gate again🔐. Then we finish our day with one last Bush Hwy patrol. 
THAT is just a regular day at the office for the SRWHMG. All this is not done by just a few people, but by more than 100 dedicated and educated hard workers, devided over several teams. 
We  appreciate every minute of their time. It is definately a labor of love! 
Thank you dear SRWHMG volunteers! Happy Labor day everyone! 🤗

#humanemanagement
@AZDA , Arizona Department of Agriculture
Tonto National Forest
 Governor Doug Ducey
LABOR of love....🐴💕 Our volunteers do much more than rescue injured Salt River wild horses...For example... A regular day for us starts at 5 am 🕔 with opening of the Forest Service gate at first light. We then patrol all areas where horses are, we warn traffic 🚗 when horses are crossing, we educate the public, we monitor and assess injuries, we record changes and new births 📝, we reunite horses, we relocate horses🐎, we clean recreation areas from manure and garbage 🗑 we clean firepits, we douse fires 🔥, we clean grafiti, we answer our hotline and respond to any horse emergency 🚑, we mend and install fencing 🛠, we drag horse carcasses, we rescue any animal abandoned in the forest, (🐈🐖🐇🐔🐕), we close hikers gates, we take care of rescued Salt River wild horses at our facilities 🥕, we communicate with authorities and we continuously fight for improvements in the horses' habitat, 👩‍💻etc etc. At the end of the day, our feed team hauls bales of hay to the feed stations and at sundown we close the FS gate again🔐. Then we finish our day with one last Bush Hwy patrol. THAT is just a regular day at the office for the SRWHMG. All this is not done by just a few people, but by more than 100 dedicated and educated hard workers, devided over several teams. We appreciate every minute of their time. It is definately a labor of love! Thank you dear SRWHMG volunteers! Happy Labor day everyone! 🤗 #humanemanagement  @AZDA , Arizona Department of Agriculture Tonto National Forest Governor Doug Ducey
Managing wild horses this closely, it gets tough sometimes, it does. Danger lies around the corner for each wild horse born free. Only the toughest and luckiest make it past their first year. 
We know that we cannot save them all, even when we give it our all, like in Cheyenne or in Sidneys case. But it won't stop us from doing the right thing the next time we encounter suffering, and the next. 
Knowing you - our supporters-  are on this wild ride alongside us is huge. We know it pains you as well when we loose one. 
So, together with everyone who has ever clicked the donate button, together with everyone who has given their time, sweat and tears, together with everyone who did something, let's look at these happy faces, and know that we make a difference together, every day, for every Salt River wild horse, on the river and at our rescue. 
It is Snow and Gideon, who graduated to be in the big field together! They are Salt River orphans, who, not too long ago had no chance of survival and teetered on the verge of death. 
So thank you for your support. It doesn't just take a village, it takes a whole State. 
Would you like to sponsor a Salt River wild horse? Any amount makes a difference. Please go to our website www.srwhmg.org and click the sponsor a horse button. Please share that with everyone you know! SRWHMG.
Managing wild horses this closely, it gets tough sometimes, it does. Danger lies around the corner for each wild horse born free. Only the toughest and luckiest make it past their first year. We know that we cannot save them all, even when we give it our all, like in Cheyenne or in Sidneys case. But it won't stop us from doing the right thing the next time we encounter suffering, and the next. Knowing you - our supporters- are on this wild ride alongside us is huge. We know it pains you as well when we loose one. So, together with everyone who has ever clicked the donate button, together with everyone who has given their time, sweat and tears, together with everyone who did something, let's look at these happy faces, and know that we make a difference together, every day, for every Salt River wild horse, on the river and at our rescue. It is Snow and Gideon, who graduated to be in the big field together! They are Salt River orphans, who, not too long ago had no chance of survival and teetered on the verge of death. So thank you for your support. It doesn't just take a village, it takes a whole State. Would you like to sponsor a Salt River wild horse? Any amount makes a difference. Please go to our website www.srwhmg.org and click the sponsor a horse button. Please share that with everyone you know! SRWHMG.
We are double sad about this: Little Sidney, named after Senator John Sidney McCain, joined him in crossing over to greener pastures where pain does not exist. 
She put up a brave fight, but succumbed to something mysterious that neither we nor our veteranarians have found the cause for yet. 
We sent her body down to Midwestern University to try to and learn more, as this may help future cases. (We will post a case report). We are so sorry and can assure you that we gave it our all, as we do for every Salt River wild horse. She was a delight for the short time we got to know her. (This video was taken before she took a turn for the worse) She wasn't hungry or thirsty, she wasn't hot, she knew play and she knew love. In the end she had relief from her pain; we think that is a better way to go than having died on the river alone or eaten alive. 
We thank our supporters and sponsors, for providing the resources for the vetbills, we thank our dedicated volunteers for providing the manpower, and we thank our AZ Department of Agriculture for making humane management possible. ***In monitoring wild horses closely, there are many ups and downs as nature can be harsh. We realize that it may not be easy to follow us and hear about the sad times either. That's why we want to thank you for bearing with us, for sharing in all of the ups and downs, and for spreading the word that all wild horses deserve humane treatment, everywhere. 
Godspeed Senator #McCain and run forever free little Sidney. 
SRWHMG #humanemanagement (Please stand by for very happy updates on Gideon and Snow and Agave and Nakota tomorrow, all doing fantastic.)
We are double sad about this: Little Sidney, named after Senator John Sidney McCain, joined him in crossing over to greener pastures where pain does not exist. She put up a brave fight, but succumbed to something mysterious that neither we nor our veteranarians have found the cause for yet. We sent her body down to Midwestern University to try to and learn more, as this may help future cases. (We will post a case report). We are so sorry and can assure you that we gave it our all, as we do for every Salt River wild horse. She was a delight for the short time we got to know her. (This video was taken before she took a turn for the worse) She wasn't hungry or thirsty, she wasn't hot, she knew play and she knew love. In the end she had relief from her pain; we think that is a better way to go than having died on the river alone or eaten alive. We thank our supporters and sponsors, for providing the resources for the vetbills, we thank our dedicated volunteers for providing the manpower, and we thank our AZ Department of Agriculture for making humane management possible. ***In monitoring wild horses closely, there are many ups and downs as nature can be harsh. We realize that it may not be easy to follow us and hear about the sad times either. That's why we want to thank you for bearing with us, for sharing in all of the ups and downs, and for spreading the word that all wild horses deserve humane treatment, everywhere. Godspeed Senator #McCain  and run forever free little Sidney. SRWHMG #humanemanagement  (Please stand by for very happy updates on Gideon and Snow and Agave and Nakota tomorrow, all doing fantastic.)
On Saturday we rescued a newborn that was stuck in the river. We named her Sidney in honor of Senator John Sidney McCain, who fought with us for the protection of the Salt River wild horses. 
We tried to find her band to reunite her, to no avail. But it turns out there was a reason for her not being able to keep up with her band, as there usually is.
At first she was doing ok and drinking well, but her face started mysteriously swelling up and she is currently at the vet and not doing well. So far it is a mystery what is going on with her. She is on antibiotics, she is getting fluids, but no one knows the cause of the swelling. She now has a tube to keep her airways open. 
We have had her inside, so a bite of some sort is not likely unless it has something to do with the red bumps she has had on her nose since we rescued her. 
We need our supporters help with funds and lots of prayers for her please. Her estimated vetbills are $3500 so far.  Thank you so very much for your support.
On Saturday we rescued a newborn that was stuck in the river. We named her Sidney in honor of Senator John Sidney McCain, who fought with us for the protection of the Salt River wild horses. We tried to find her band to reunite her, to no avail. But it turns out there was a reason for her not being able to keep up with her band, as there usually is. At first she was doing ok and drinking well, but her face started mysteriously swelling up and she is currently at the vet and not doing well. So far it is a mystery what is going on with her. She is on antibiotics, she is getting fluids, but no one knows the cause of the swelling. She now has a tube to keep her airways open. We have had her inside, so a bite of some sort is not likely unless it has something to do with the red bumps she has had on her nose since we rescued her. We need our supporters help with funds and lots of prayers for her please. Her estimated vetbills are $3500 so far. Thank you so very much for your support.