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    Michael
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Checkpoint Charlie 🇩🇪 // Checkpoint Charlie was a crossing point between East and West Berlin from 1947-1990. In 1961, East German leader Walter Ulbricht sought the Soviet Union's permission to construct the Berlin Wall to prevent Eastern Bloc emigration and defection to the west. In 1989 the wall fell after a series of protests made by the East German citizens. The checkpoint was removed in June 1990, however it remained an official crossing point for visitors and diplomats until the reunification of Germany in October, later that year. The current sign and guard house are replicas of the original constructions from 1961 // #adventure #travel #explore #trip #traveller #travelling #instatravel #traveltheworld #world #igers #travelphotography #travelphoto #architecture #history #snapseed #city #ironcurtain #germany #deutschland #berlin #berlinwall #checkpointcharlie #war #sign #visitberlin #visitgermany
Checkpoint Charlie 🇩🇪 // Checkpoint Charlie was a crossing point between East and West Berlin from 1947-1990. In 1961, East German leader Walter Ulbricht sought the Soviet Union's permission to construct the Berlin Wall to prevent Eastern Bloc emigration and defection to the west. In 1989 the wall fell after a series of protests made by the East German citizens. The checkpoint was removed in June 1990, however it remained an official crossing point for visitors and diplomats until the reunification of Germany in October, later that year. The current sign and guard house are replicas of the original constructions from 1961 // #adventure  #travel  #explore  #trip  #traveller  #travelling  #instatravel  #traveltheworld  #world  #igers  #travelphotography  #travelphoto  #architecture  #history  #snapseed  #city  #ironcurtain  #germany  #deutschland  #berlin  #berlinwall  #checkpointcharlie  #war  #sign  #visitberlin  #visitgermany 
The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe 🇩🇪 // The Holocaust was a mass genocide carried out by Nazi Germany and the Axis Powers. Approximately six million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish people of Europe were massacred between 1941 and 1945. The monument was created by Peter Eisenman and BuroHappold. It consists of 2,711 stelae over a 200,000 sq ft area that are ‘designed to produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere, [representing] a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason’ //
The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe 🇩🇪 // The Holocaust was a mass genocide carried out by Nazi Germany and the Axis Powers. Approximately six million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish people of Europe were massacred between 1941 and 1945. The monument was created by Peter Eisenman and BuroHappold. It consists of 2,711 stelae over a 200,000 sq ft area that are ‘designed to produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere, [representing] a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason’ //
The Little Crushed Man 🇫🇷 // Inside the Church of Jacobins, hiding in plain sight, is a stone carving of a little man, trapped under the base of a column. All that can be seen is a set of hands and feet on either side. You’d probably miss the carving if you weren’t looking for it. The meaning and origin are unknown; apparently some guides don’t even know that this little guy exists //
The Little Crushed Man 🇫🇷 // Inside the Church of Jacobins, hiding in plain sight, is a stone carving of a little man, trapped under the base of a column. All that can be seen is a set of hands and feet on either side. You’d probably miss the carving if you weren’t looking for it. The meaning and origin are unknown; apparently some guides don’t even know that this little guy exists //
The Basilica of Saint-Sernin 🇫🇷 // This Romanesque church was built around the late 11th or early 12th century. The church is the largest remaining Romanesque building in Europe and possibly in the entire world. There is debate as to when the church was completed, however it is believed that it occurred during four building campaigns, with breaks in between each session. This can be seen through the brick patterns throughout the church. The Earl of Leicester (UK), Simon de Montfort, was killed in 1218, when a stone was thrown from the roof of Saint-Sernin. 
The church features a crypt that looks like something straight out of Hogwarts; it is definitely worth paying the €2.50 entry fee //
The Basilica of Saint-Sernin 🇫🇷 // This Romanesque church was built around the late 11th or early 12th century. The church is the largest remaining Romanesque building in Europe and possibly in the entire world. There is debate as to when the church was completed, however it is believed that it occurred during four building campaigns, with breaks in between each session. This can be seen through the brick patterns throughout the church. The Earl of Leicester (UK), Simon de Montfort, was killed in 1218, when a stone was thrown from the roof of Saint-Sernin. The church features a crypt that looks like something straight out of Hogwarts; it is definitely worth paying the €2.50 entry fee //
La Garonne 🇫🇷 // The fountain was created by the Toulouse-born sculptor, Jules Jacques Labatut, at the start of the 20th century. The sculpture is an allegory that represents the Garonne River, offering electrical energy to the city of Toulouse //
La Garonne 🇫🇷 // The fountain was created by the Toulouse-born sculptor, Jules Jacques Labatut, at the start of the 20th century. The sculpture is an allegory that represents the Garonne River, offering electrical energy to the city of Toulouse //
The Church of the Jacobins 🇫🇷 // During the early 13th century, in the former French province of Languedoc, a branch of Christianity called Catharism grew in popularity. Members of the Catholic Church considered this movement to be heresy. Saint Dominic (the patron saint of astronomers and the founder of the Dominican Order) assembled a group of friars and constructed a church from pink, Roman brick. Over the next century, the congregation grew and the church was expanded and its unique construction became known as ‘the palm tree of the Jacobins’. Following the French Revolution (1789), the Dominican order was banned and the friars were forced to leave the now deconsecrated church. In 1810, Napoléon requisitioned the church, stripped the religious iconography and converted it into barracks. During the First World War, the church was used to safely store artefacts from the museums of Paris. Today, the church functions as a museum/performance space and it has been fully restored to its former glory //
The Church of the Jacobins 🇫🇷 // During the early 13th century, in the former French province of Languedoc, a branch of Christianity called Catharism grew in popularity. Members of the Catholic Church considered this movement to be heresy. Saint Dominic (the patron saint of astronomers and the founder of the Dominican Order) assembled a group of friars and constructed a church from pink, Roman brick. Over the next century, the congregation grew and the church was expanded and its unique construction became known as ‘the palm tree of the Jacobins’. Following the French Revolution (1789), the Dominican order was banned and the friars were forced to leave the now deconsecrated church. In 1810, Napoléon requisitioned the church, stripped the religious iconography and converted it into barracks. During the First World War, the church was used to safely store artefacts from the museums of Paris. Today, the church functions as a museum/performance space and it has been fully restored to its former glory //
Brecon Cathedral 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 // Constructed sometime during the late 11th or early 12th century, the church was renovated and extended in 1215. The gothic-style church was formerly known as the church of the Holy Rood due to its possession of a golden rood. The supposed relic (a piece of the cross of Christ) was destroyed during the Dissolution of Monasteries in the 16th century. During the dissolution, in 1538, the priory church became a parish church and retained this status until the disestablishment of the Church in Wales (separated from The Church of England) in 1920. Three years later, the church became Brecon Cathedral //
Brecon Cathedral 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 // Constructed sometime during the late 11th or early 12th century, the church was renovated and extended in 1215. The gothic-style church was formerly known as the church of the Holy Rood due to its possession of a golden rood. The supposed relic (a piece of the cross of Christ) was destroyed during the Dissolution of Monasteries in the 16th century. During the dissolution, in 1538, the priory church became a parish church and retained this status until the disestablishment of the Church in Wales (separated from The Church of England) in 1920. Three years later, the church became Brecon Cathedral //
Trinity College Chapel 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // Construction on this baroque-style chapel began in 1691. It was issued by Ralph Bathurst, president of the college and vice-chancellor of the University and designed by Henry Aldrich. The chapel was built on the foundations of a previous site which was consecrated in 1410. The tomb of Trinity College founder, Sir Thomas Pope, is housed within the chapel //
Trinity College Chapel 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // Construction on this baroque-style chapel began in 1691. It was issued by Ralph Bathurst, president of the college and vice-chancellor of the University and designed by Henry Aldrich. The chapel was built on the foundations of a previous site which was consecrated in 1410. The tomb of Trinity College founder, Sir Thomas Pope, is housed within the chapel //
The Bodleian Library 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // This is the main research library of the University of Oxford. Established in 1602, the Bodleian is one of the oldest libraries in Europe and the second largest in Britain. It holds over twelve million items and these documents cannot be removed from the premises. Before being granted access to the library, new readers are required to agree to a formal declaration. This declaration was traditionally an oral oath, but is now usually made by signing a letter to a similar effect //
The Bodleian Library 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // This is the main research library of the University of Oxford. Established in 1602, the Bodleian is one of the oldest libraries in Europe and the second largest in Britain. It holds over twelve million items and these documents cannot be removed from the premises. Before being granted access to the library, new readers are required to agree to a formal declaration. This declaration was traditionally an oral oath, but is now usually made by signing a letter to a similar effect //
Bath Abbey 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // During the dissolution of monasteries, in the 1500s, Bath Abbey lost its Benedictine, cathedral status. It was stripped of lead, iron and glass and left to fall into ruin. In 1574, Elizabeth I ordered for the church to be restored and it became an Anglican parish church. The west front, seen here, features sculptures of angels climbing to heaven on two Jacob’s ladders. According to the Book of Genesis, Jacob's Ladder is the connection between the earth and heaven that the biblical patriarch Jacob envisions in a dream //
Bath Abbey 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // During the dissolution of monasteries, in the 1500s, Bath Abbey lost its Benedictine, cathedral status. It was stripped of lead, iron and glass and left to fall into ruin. In 1574, Elizabeth I ordered for the church to be restored and it became an Anglican parish church. The west front, seen here, features sculptures of angels climbing to heaven on two Jacob’s ladders. According to the Book of Genesis, Jacob's Ladder is the connection between the earth and heaven that the biblical patriarch Jacob envisions in a dream //
Longtown Castle 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // After the 11th century Norman invasion, a timber frame castle was constructed to control conquered Welsh territory and defend the English borders from Welsh raiders. Sometime post 1148, Gilbert de Lacy rebuilt the castle using stone. Lacey also founded the adjacent town to help pay for the costs of these modifications. The castle fell into decline during the 1400s and the ruins now consist of a cylindrical keep, atop a motte, and a stone walled bailey. A gallows operated at the castle until 1790. This must have been an eerie sight with hanging criminals against the backdrop of ruins //
Longtown Castle 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // After the 11th century Norman invasion, a timber frame castle was constructed to control conquered Welsh territory and defend the English borders from Welsh raiders. Sometime post 1148, Gilbert de Lacy rebuilt the castle using stone. Lacey also founded the adjacent town to help pay for the costs of these modifications. The castle fell into decline during the 1400s and the ruins now consist of a cylindrical keep, atop a motte, and a stone walled bailey. A gallows operated at the castle until 1790. This must have been an eerie sight with hanging criminals against the backdrop of ruins //
Penrhyn Quarry 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 // By the end of the nineteenth century this was the worlds largest slate quarry. The earliest reference to slate extraction at Penrhyn was documented in 1570 and the site was further developed in the 1700s. The quarry is now home to Europe’s longest zip line, which travels over a mile at speeds up to 100mph //
Penrhyn Quarry 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 // By the end of the nineteenth century this was the worlds largest slate quarry. The earliest reference to slate extraction at Penrhyn was documented in 1570 and the site was further developed in the 1700s. The quarry is now home to Europe’s longest zip line, which travels over a mile at speeds up to 100mph //
Old Gorhambury House 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // The property was originally owned by St Albans Abbey and was bought by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, after the dissolution of monasteries in the 16th century. Bacon spent five years rebuilding the property; these are the remains of the Elizabethan Manor House we see today. Upon its completion, Elizabeth I visited the home and remarked on the underwhelming size of the manor. It was subsequently, substantially extended prior to the Queens second visit. The house eventually passed to Bacons son, Sir Francis Bacon, the celebrated philosopher and Chancellor to James I //
Old Gorhambury House 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // The property was originally owned by St Albans Abbey and was bought by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, after the dissolution of monasteries in the 16th century. Bacon spent five years rebuilding the property; these are the remains of the Elizabethan Manor House we see today. Upon its completion, Elizabeth I visited the home and remarked on the underwhelming size of the manor. It was subsequently, substantially extended prior to the Queens second visit. The house eventually passed to Bacons son, Sir Francis Bacon, the celebrated philosopher and Chancellor to James I //
Lee Hall 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // The remains of Lee Hall stand on a site once home to a 12th century priory. Following the dissolution of monasteries (in the 1500s) Sir Richard Lee bought the property, tore it down and built his Tudor home. Lee was a military engineer in service to Henry VIII and his successors, Edward VI and Elizabeth I. He was an advisor and commander for Henry VIII, appointed surveyor of the King’s works and a member of parliament for Hertfordshire //
Lee Hall 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // The remains of Lee Hall stand on a site once home to a 12th century priory. Following the dissolution of monasteries (in the 1500s) Sir Richard Lee bought the property, tore it down and built his Tudor home. Lee was a military engineer in service to Henry VIII and his successors, Edward VI and Elizabeth I. He was an advisor and commander for Henry VIII, appointed surveyor of the King’s works and a member of parliament for Hertfordshire //
Someries Castle 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // This fortified manor was built in the 1400s by Sir John Wenlock. Wenlock is noted as having fought for both the Yorkists and the opposing Lancastrians during the War of the Roses. He was dubbed ‘the prince of turncoats’ for changing his allegiance. Wenlock is said to haunt the now ruined site, which is considered to be one of the earliest residential uses of brick in England //
Someries Castle 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 // This fortified manor was built in the 1400s by Sir John Wenlock. Wenlock is noted as having fought for both the Yorkists and the opposing Lancastrians during the War of the Roses. He was dubbed ‘the prince of turncoats’ for changing his allegiance. Wenlock is said to haunt the now ruined site, which is considered to be one of the earliest residential uses of brick in England //
Paphos Lighthouse 🇨🇾 // The lighthouse was constructed in the 1880s under British rule. Cyprus was a key military base that helped to defend and protect vessels travelling through the Suez Cana, to other British colonies. The lighthouse was a marker for ships heading towards Paphos harbour from the UK //
Paphos Lighthouse 🇨🇾 // The lighthouse was constructed in the 1880s under British rule. Cyprus was a key military base that helped to defend and protect vessels travelling through the Suez Cana, to other British colonies. The lighthouse was a marker for ships heading towards Paphos harbour from the UK //
The House of Theseus 🇨🇾 // This ruined villa was built during the 2nd century AD, on the remains of Hellenistic and earlier Roman buildings. It is believed the house was inhabited until the 7th century AD and was possibly home to an important Roman official; there would have been in excess of 100 rooms within the property. The house also has a large, well preserved, ancient mosaic that depicts the mythical battle of Theseus and the Minotaur //
The House of Theseus 🇨🇾 // This ruined villa was built during the 2nd century AD, on the remains of Hellenistic and earlier Roman buildings. It is believed the house was inhabited until the 7th century AD and was possibly home to an important Roman official; there would have been in excess of 100 rooms within the property. The house also has a large, well preserved, ancient mosaic that depicts the mythical battle of Theseus and the Minotaur //
Büyük Han (TRNC) // This is the largest caravanserai in Cyprus. Caravanserai are similar to an inn; a place for travellers to rest. Büyük Han was built in 1572 after the Ottoman invasion. In 1878, during the British takeover, the inn was utilised as a prison and became the central prison of Nicosia between 1892 and 1903. It is now regarded ‘one of the finest buildings on the island’ and is home to galleries, cafes and small shops //
Büyük Han (TRNC) // This is the largest caravanserai in Cyprus. Caravanserai are similar to an inn; a place for travellers to rest. Büyük Han was built in 1572 after the Ottoman invasion. In 1878, during the British takeover, the inn was utilised as a prison and became the central prison of Nicosia between 1892 and 1903. It is now regarded ‘one of the finest buildings on the island’ and is home to galleries, cafes and small shops //