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  • lucymcconnellfit
    Lucy McConnell
    @lucymcconnellfit

Images by lucymcconnellfit

Is 5 pairs of @lululemon align pants too many? Is 3 selfies too many? Asking for a friend. #whyamilikethis
Is 5 pairs of @lululemon align pants too many? Is 3 selfies too many? Asking for a friend. #whyamilikethis 
"Consistency is what counts. You have to be willing to commit to doing things over and over again - and doing so with the right attitude as well. What? You're bored with your routine? What, are you 10 years old? No one ever achieved a worthy long-term goal by applying themselves only when they felt like it. People who are consistent with both their routines and their attitudes toward their routines never get enough credit for doing so - as others flop around looking for 'shortcuts and secrets'. It can't just be about the goal - it has to be about the kind of person you are being as you pursue that goal. Remember that."
- unknown
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Photographer: @marceauphotography
"Consistency is what counts. You have to be willing to commit to doing things over and over again - and doing so with the right attitude as well. What? You're bored with your routine? What, are you 10 years old? No one ever achieved a worthy long-term goal by applying themselves only when they felt like it. People who are consistent with both their routines and their attitudes toward their routines never get enough credit for doing so - as others flop around looking for 'shortcuts and secrets'. It can't just be about the goal - it has to be about the kind of person you are being as you pursue that goal. Remember that." - unknown —————————————————————————- Photographer: @marceauphotography
Rare photo with no Lululemon in sight
Rare photo with no Lululemon in sight
Sooo you’re working out again, does that mean your period is back to normal? I have been getting this question in my DMs a lot of late. I hate the question because I don’t like admitting to the answer. Is my period 100% back to normal? No. Is it still coming though? Yes.
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Since I managed to recover my period around the middle of the year I have had about 3 periods. 3 over the course of 6 months I think is actually quite realistic for the amenorrhea recovery stage. It was never going to come back in perfect 28 day cycles from the outset and I was very aware of that. It could take up to a year for me to get a consistent monthly cycle.
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Have I shot myself in the foot though by going back to training so soon? Possibly. It’s hard to know how regular I would be if I had continued resting my body for a few more months. Truth be told I live and breathe fitness. It is my job. And I love it. I have been strategic with my food intake - I kept it very very high when I first added in my training and I think this supported my recovery further.
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Everyone’s process is so individualised. In a perfect world would I have stayed out of the gym for another few months? Yes probably. I hate to admit that I couldn’t do it, but I am also proud that I supported my body in other ways that has led to my body continuing to cycle, albeit less regular.
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To the beautiful ladies who have been messaging and commenting asking for an update, Thankyou for your ongoing support and encouragement! Sorry that I’m too much of a gym junkie to have stuck it out 🤷🏽‍♀️
Sooo you’re working out again, does that mean your period is back to normal? I have been getting this question in my DMs a lot of late. I hate the question because I don’t like admitting to the answer. Is my period 100% back to normal? No. Is it still coming though? Yes. - Since I managed to recover my period around the middle of the year I have had about 3 periods. 3 over the course of 6 months I think is actually quite realistic for the amenorrhea recovery stage. It was never going to come back in perfect 28 day cycles from the outset and I was very aware of that. It could take up to a year for me to get a consistent monthly cycle. - Have I shot myself in the foot though by going back to training so soon? Possibly. It’s hard to know how regular I would be if I had continued resting my body for a few more months. Truth be told I live and breathe fitness. It is my job. And I love it. I have been strategic with my food intake - I kept it very very high when I first added in my training and I think this supported my recovery further. - Everyone’s process is so individualised. In a perfect world would I have stayed out of the gym for another few months? Yes probably. I hate to admit that I couldn’t do it, but I am also proud that I supported my body in other ways that has led to my body continuing to cycle, albeit less regular. - To the beautiful ladies who have been messaging and commenting asking for an update, Thankyou for your ongoing support and encouragement! Sorry that I’m too much of a gym junkie to have stuck it out 🤷🏽‍♀️
Loves a boomie I do 🤷🏽‍♀️
Loves a boomie I do 🤷🏽‍♀️
You’re never gonna see the end of these photos #sorrynotsorry
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Photographer: @marceauphotography 
MUA: @gracewelcomemua
Wearing: @thehessiancollection
You’re never gonna see the end of these photos #sorrynotsorry  - Photographer: @marceauphotography MUA: @gracewelcomemua Wearing: @thehessiancollection
Since the start of this year my Instagram content has slowly shifted away from discussions of dieting and body composition, much as my goals have. However, working in a fitness world characterised by 8 week challenges and goals that consist only of weight loss has made me realise yet again that fitness is truly becoming synonymous with weight loss. As this time of year tends to be the time when every one and their pet hamster is jumping on a summer shred plan, I felt as though I would at least offer some advice on how to avoid the bullshit and lose weight in a smart way. This advice isn’t sexy or groundbreaking and won’t guarantee you dramatic results in a matter of weeks, but it might save you putting your body through the same stress that I once did and am still paying the price of.
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1. If your daily intake is sub 1700 calories and you are planning on commencing a diet you are probably setting yourself up for failure (in most cases). Successful weight loss relies on you being able to consistently decrease your intake in increments until you reach your desired body composition. If you are starting from a low intake it doesn’t give you a lot of wiggle room to drop calories and you will soon find yourself on an intake that is unsustainable and bloody miserable.
2. If you are expecting to diet down to reveal an athletic “fitspo” physique, yet you haven’t spent a significant time resistance training to build some muscle, you will probably be unsuccessful. Getting at least 6 months of resistance training under your belt, eating at maintenance or slightly above maintenance will do you a world of good. Adding some muscle to your frame will not only help you aesthetically, but it will also increase your daily caloric expenditure meaning you can potentially diet on higher calories.
3. Take it slow. Try to keep your intake as high as possible whilst still making progress. When you stop progressing you will need to change something, by adding more expenditure through cardio or decreasing intake. You also need to understand that if you’re serious about this, it will probably get uncomfortable at some point, at which stage you need to think about point 4:
CONTINUED BELOW
Since the start of this year my Instagram content has slowly shifted away from discussions of dieting and body composition, much as my goals have. However, working in a fitness world characterised by 8 week challenges and goals that consist only of weight loss has made me realise yet again that fitness is truly becoming synonymous with weight loss. As this time of year tends to be the time when every one and their pet hamster is jumping on a summer shred plan, I felt as though I would at least offer some advice on how to avoid the bullshit and lose weight in a smart way. This advice isn’t sexy or groundbreaking and won’t guarantee you dramatic results in a matter of weeks, but it might save you putting your body through the same stress that I once did and am still paying the price of. - 1. If your daily intake is sub 1700 calories and you are planning on commencing a diet you are probably setting yourself up for failure (in most cases). Successful weight loss relies on you being able to consistently decrease your intake in increments until you reach your desired body composition. If you are starting from a low intake it doesn’t give you a lot of wiggle room to drop calories and you will soon find yourself on an intake that is unsustainable and bloody miserable. 2. If you are expecting to diet down to reveal an athletic “fitspo” physique, yet you haven’t spent a significant time resistance training to build some muscle, you will probably be unsuccessful. Getting at least 6 months of resistance training under your belt, eating at maintenance or slightly above maintenance will do you a world of good. Adding some muscle to your frame will not only help you aesthetically, but it will also increase your daily caloric expenditure meaning you can potentially diet on higher calories. 3. Take it slow. Try to keep your intake as high as possible whilst still making progress. When you stop progressing you will need to change something, by adding more expenditure through cardio or decreasing intake. You also need to understand that if you’re serious about this, it will probably get uncomfortable at some point, at which stage you need to think about point 4: CONTINUED BELOW
Love a good selfie ✌🏼
Love a good selfie ✌🏼
An oldie but a goodie
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One year ago. Mallorca, Spain.
🇪🇸 🇪🇸
An oldie but a goodie - One year ago. Mallorca, Spain. 🇪🇸 🇪🇸
I wanted to address on a touchy topic that has always bothered me, especially within the fitness social media bubble. I have spoken about it before on my page but a recent YouTube video that came up on my feed spurred me to re address it. It is that of over eating being mistakenly referred to as binge eating. The frequency with which the term 'bingeing' is thrown around in a nonchalant manner makes it seem as though almost everyone going through a dieting phase has binge eating disorder.
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For a period of time during my fitness journey I suffered through multiple binges. Whilst I would not consider myself as completely falling into having the disorder I can most definitely relate to the American National Eating Disorders definition of the illness as "recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge; experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards". I am all too familiar with the mental and physical discomfort of such episodes and it is a battle that I would not wish upon my worst enemy.
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Mindlessly eating an entire packet of chips whilst watching Netflix, or maybe helping yourself to one too many delicious treats at someone's birthday party or a family meal is not a binge. Christmas Day or Easter Sunday is not a binge. Going slightly off plan, or over on your macros for one day is not a binge. Bingeing is a serious disorder, and is a word that should not be thrown around lightly.
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I have noticed one too many youtubers and fitness instagrammers claim to have had a binge after eating an extra handful of nuts and another protein bar. This invalidates the struggle that many people go through daily. If you are still in control, you are simply choosing to over eat. If you are not in control, this is binge eating.
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If you feel as though you are suffering from binge eating disorder please seek help from a mental health professional. It is something that you can safely work through. Do not be afraid to ask for help.
#mentalhealthawareness #mentalhealthisimportant
I wanted to address on a touchy topic that has always bothered me, especially within the fitness social media bubble. I have spoken about it before on my page but a recent YouTube video that came up on my feed spurred me to re address it. It is that of over eating being mistakenly referred to as binge eating. The frequency with which the term 'bingeing' is thrown around in a nonchalant manner makes it seem as though almost everyone going through a dieting phase has binge eating disorder. - For a period of time during my fitness journey I suffered through multiple binges. Whilst I would not consider myself as completely falling into having the disorder I can most definitely relate to the American National Eating Disorders definition of the illness as "recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge; experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards". I am all too familiar with the mental and physical discomfort of such episodes and it is a battle that I would not wish upon my worst enemy. - Mindlessly eating an entire packet of chips whilst watching Netflix, or maybe helping yourself to one too many delicious treats at someone's birthday party or a family meal is not a binge. Christmas Day or Easter Sunday is not a binge. Going slightly off plan, or over on your macros for one day is not a binge. Bingeing is a serious disorder, and is a word that should not be thrown around lightly. - I have noticed one too many youtubers and fitness instagrammers claim to have had a binge after eating an extra handful of nuts and another protein bar. This invalidates the struggle that many people go through daily. If you are still in control, you are simply choosing to over eat. If you are not in control, this is binge eating. - If you feel as though you are suffering from binge eating disorder please seek help from a mental health professional. It is something that you can safely work through. Do not be afraid to ask for help. #mentalhealthawareness  #mentalhealthisimportant 
Spring kicks off this week in Australia (although you wouldn’t know it ❄️☁️) and for the first time in years I am not commencing a “summer shred”. This scares the shit out of me. I have spent the last five years of my life training my brain to believe there was only one acceptable summer body for me, one only attainable by putting myself through two months of low calorie misery.
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I’ve touched on this in a few posts recently but this year has been the year of reforming my perception of bodies, challenging my internalised fatphobia and asking myself why I place so much value on my body fat percentage. Truth is, I would never be critical of the size of the bodies of the people around me, especially those that are close to me so why would they give a shit about mine? I understand it’s not as simple as that, and many of us pursue leanness for reasons far beyond the opinions of others.
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I have found that challenging the social constructs that have shaped and manipulated your own thoughts is a good place to start. Consider the $60 billion diet industry that capitalises off making you feel like shit, that convinces you that being worthy is just one diet away. Think about the single idealised body type glamourised by the fashion industry, entertainment industry and on social media, all platforms that lack diversity in body type, skin colour, sexuality and ability. Question the social ideals that place more pressure on you as a female to fit societies ideals of thinness. Ask yourself why the pressure on you is far greater than the pressure placed on your male friends. Surround yourself with people (online and in person) who have different body types. Follow those with bodies bigger than you and who glow with self confidence and empowerment. Follow women who look just like you and have no desire to change their bodies. Let the beauty of their self love and acceptance allow you to challenge your self destructive inner monologue.
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I spent most of my life learning what I had to be and what I had to look like to be worthy of love. Now I am working to unlearn it. If only it was that simple.
Spring kicks off this week in Australia (although you wouldn’t know it ❄️☁️) and for the first time in years I am not commencing a “summer shred”. This scares the shit out of me. I have spent the last five years of my life training my brain to believe there was only one acceptable summer body for me, one only attainable by putting myself through two months of low calorie misery. - I’ve touched on this in a few posts recently but this year has been the year of reforming my perception of bodies, challenging my internalised fatphobia and asking myself why I place so much value on my body fat percentage. Truth is, I would never be critical of the size of the bodies of the people around me, especially those that are close to me so why would they give a shit about mine? I understand it’s not as simple as that, and many of us pursue leanness for reasons far beyond the opinions of others. - I have found that challenging the social constructs that have shaped and manipulated your own thoughts is a good place to start. Consider the $60 billion diet industry that capitalises off making you feel like shit, that convinces you that being worthy is just one diet away. Think about the single idealised body type glamourised by the fashion industry, entertainment industry and on social media, all platforms that lack diversity in body type, skin colour, sexuality and ability. Question the social ideals that place more pressure on you as a female to fit societies ideals of thinness. Ask yourself why the pressure on you is far greater than the pressure placed on your male friends. Surround yourself with people (online and in person) who have different body types. Follow those with bodies bigger than you and who glow with self confidence and empowerment. Follow women who look just like you and have no desire to change their bodies. Let the beauty of their self love and acceptance allow you to challenge your self destructive inner monologue. - I spent most of my life learning what I had to be and what I had to look like to be worthy of love. Now I am working to unlearn it. If only it was that simple.
Do I look like I lift yet?
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One of my biggest fears when I took 5 months off the gym this year was that I would lose all my muscle and not look #fitness anymore. A fear completely tied up in the destructive need to personally define and identify myself as the fit one, the one who lost all the weight. I did lose muscle when I took time off. I wasn’t surprised about that. What has surprised me is how quickly my body responded to training when I came back.
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Since being back in the gym I have regained all my muscle and possibly more. I have been able to consistently add weight to the bar every single week so I am now benching more than I ever did before. I have been shocked at the excess of energy I have had outside the gym, something I never had before. All this has been on a significantly lower volume program than I have EVER done before. I am training 3 days a week, 4 MAX. I am doing 75% of the amount of sets I used to, and 60% of the number of exercises per session. I am keeping it simple, and focusing on progressive overload. Rest is important. Recovery is essential to growth. Who would’ve thought (lol)
Do I look like I lift yet? - One of my biggest fears when I took 5 months off the gym this year was that I would lose all my muscle and not look #fitness  anymore. A fear completely tied up in the destructive need to personally define and identify myself as the fit one, the one who lost all the weight. I did lose muscle when I took time off. I wasn’t surprised about that. What has surprised me is how quickly my body responded to training when I came back. - Since being back in the gym I have regained all my muscle and possibly more. I have been able to consistently add weight to the bar every single week so I am now benching more than I ever did before. I have been shocked at the excess of energy I have had outside the gym, something I never had before. All this has been on a significantly lower volume program than I have EVER done before. I am training 3 days a week, 4 MAX. I am doing 75% of the amount of sets I used to, and 60% of the number of exercises per session. I am keeping it simple, and focusing on progressive overload. Rest is important. Recovery is essential to growth. Who would’ve thought (lol)
Happy Friday friends 👋🏽👋🏽
Happy Friday friends 👋🏽👋🏽
For the majority of this year my Instagram posts have been dominated by me documenting my recovery from Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (HA). I shared my process of eating alllll the foods and significantly cutting my exercise (so that I was not doing ANY at all) which after a 6 month journey resulted in me getting my first period in several years.
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The reason that I am still harping on about this is because I believe HA is something that is very easy to prevent if only there was a bit more awareness about it. Truth is, basic information about HA is out there, but nothing that is actually very helpful for someone who has recently been diagnosed with it.
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HA manifests itself in one of two ways. The first is in women who are normal to low weight, and undereat/overexercise to a BMI anywhere from 21 on down. The second happens in women who were overweight to begin with, then lost a significant amount of weight; in some cases going to low BMIs as well. If you fit either of these categories it is worth being aware of the potential damage you have caused to your body. To get into the science of it I have taken an except from a blog post by Nicola Rinaldi (Author of “No Period, Now What”) to explain it further.
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“In HA, what happens is that as the body goes into a semi starvation mode with a constant energy deficit due to the undereating/overexercising, leptin levels decrease (see Welt CK et al.). This then leads to decreases in the levels and pulsatile frequency of LH, and estradiol, and the natural hormonal cycle stops. Increases in eating, particularly in carbohydrates and fats (good and bad) restore the natural leptin levels within a reasonable amount of time - usually 6 months to a year after making wholehearted changes (in many cases cycles are restored even more quickly than that; the quicker the weight is gained, the more quickly the cycles return).”
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If you have been suffering from HA (I know there are a lot of you out there following along) read widely and be open to the realities of recovering your cycle. It is highly likely it will contain weight gain and decreases in training.
CONTINUED IN COMMENTS 👇🏼
For the majority of this year my Instagram posts have been dominated by me documenting my recovery from Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (HA). I shared my process of eating alllll the foods and significantly cutting my exercise (so that I was not doing ANY at all) which after a 6 month journey resulted in me getting my first period in several years. - The reason that I am still harping on about this is because I believe HA is something that is very easy to prevent if only there was a bit more awareness about it. Truth is, basic information about HA is out there, but nothing that is actually very helpful for someone who has recently been diagnosed with it. - HA manifests itself in one of two ways. The first is in women who are normal to low weight, and undereat/overexercise to a BMI anywhere from 21 on down. The second happens in women who were overweight to begin with, then lost a significant amount of weight; in some cases going to low BMIs as well. If you fit either of these categories it is worth being aware of the potential damage you have caused to your body. To get into the science of it I have taken an except from a blog post by Nicola Rinaldi (Author of “No Period, Now What”) to explain it further. - “In HA, what happens is that as the body goes into a semi starvation mode with a constant energy deficit due to the undereating/overexercising, leptin levels decrease (see Welt CK et al.). This then leads to decreases in the levels and pulsatile frequency of LH, and estradiol, and the natural hormonal cycle stops. Increases in eating, particularly in carbohydrates and fats (good and bad) restore the natural leptin levels within a reasonable amount of time - usually 6 months to a year after making wholehearted changes (in many cases cycles are restored even more quickly than that; the quicker the weight is gained, the more quickly the cycles return).” - If you have been suffering from HA (I know there are a lot of you out there following along) read widely and be open to the realities of recovering your cycle. It is highly likely it will contain weight gain and decreases in training. CONTINUED IN COMMENTS 👇🏼
Whenever you have a bad feeling about your body or appearance, ask yourself “who profits off this emotion?”
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#wednesdaywisdom
Whenever you have a bad feeling about your body or appearance, ask yourself “who profits off this emotion?” - #wednesdaywisdom 
When talking about weight stigma in relation to the female body one can almost suggest that there are two different areas that need attention. The first is the existence of institutionalised fatphobia. That is, the attitudes, behaviors, and societal structures that prioritize thinness over fatness and make life easier for thin people. When it comes to this fatphobia, I would argue that apart from pledging to be an ally to people in larger bodies, the thin privileged should learn how to shut up and listen.
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There is another element of weight stigma that affects everyone, that does not discriminate between fat and skinny and that is deeply wrapped up in sexism. That element is internalized fatphobia. It’s that driving knowledge that your body is not worthy and never will be, that you’re fat and ugly, and that causes you to treat your body in horrific ways. While this type of body shame does apply to men as well, in many ways it’s wrapped up in the conviction that women’s appearance is the most important thing about them, the idea that women’s bodies don’t belong to themselves, and the underlying message that women should always be taking up less space.
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Over the last 6 months I have been forced to accept the challenge of accepting and embracing weight gain, more specifically fat gain. In doing so I have become acutely aware with my own ingrained fatphobia that I was previously not privy to. I realise that by regularly publishing photos of my past self, who was larger and had more fat and comparing it to my more recent, thinner and socially acceptable self I was creating an attitude towards myself that a thinner me is a better me. The old me was not worthy of love, and the new thinner me is. This attitude generated a highly toxic mental state for me to embark on my weight gain and recovery journey, something I have had to address everyday.
-
I don’t have a solution or any inspiring words. I just wanted to prompt you to consider why fat is bad. Why we are conditioned to believe that smaller is better. And what you think you will gain by being a smaller version of yourself. Where does it all come from?
When talking about weight stigma in relation to the female body one can almost suggest that there are two different areas that need attention. The first is the existence of institutionalised fatphobia. That is, the attitudes, behaviors, and societal structures that prioritize thinness over fatness and make life easier for thin people. When it comes to this fatphobia, I would argue that apart from pledging to be an ally to people in larger bodies, the thin privileged should learn how to shut up and listen. - There is another element of weight stigma that affects everyone, that does not discriminate between fat and skinny and that is deeply wrapped up in sexism. That element is internalized fatphobia. It’s that driving knowledge that your body is not worthy and never will be, that you’re fat and ugly, and that causes you to treat your body in horrific ways. While this type of body shame does apply to men as well, in many ways it’s wrapped up in the conviction that women’s appearance is the most important thing about them, the idea that women’s bodies don’t belong to themselves, and the underlying message that women should always be taking up less space. - Over the last 6 months I have been forced to accept the challenge of accepting and embracing weight gain, more specifically fat gain. In doing so I have become acutely aware with my own ingrained fatphobia that I was previously not privy to. I realise that by regularly publishing photos of my past self, who was larger and had more fat and comparing it to my more recent, thinner and socially acceptable self I was creating an attitude towards myself that a thinner me is a better me. The old me was not worthy of love, and the new thinner me is. This attitude generated a highly toxic mental state for me to embark on my weight gain and recovery journey, something I have had to address everyday. - I don’t have a solution or any inspiring words. I just wanted to prompt you to consider why fat is bad. Why we are conditioned to believe that smaller is better. And what you think you will gain by being a smaller version of yourself. Where does it all come from?
An oldie but a goodie.
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Who has been here since my old pink wall days?
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#throwbackthursday
An oldie but a goodie. - Who has been here since my old pink wall days? - #throwbackthursday 
Hey hi hello it’s been a hot minuto since I have posted on here. I feel like I start every caption with that these days but I did want to post a lil update with what has been happening with my health.
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About 6 weeks ago I excitedly posted about getting my menstrual cycle back after several years without it. I got myself into that mess by maintaining a body fat percentage that was too low and exercising too intensely for the amount of food I was eating.
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Well, in all honesty it’s been 6 weeks and I am yet to have another period. Am I worried? I’d be lying if I said no. However I am also well aware that the chances of me miraculously falling back into a 28 day cycle were very low. It doesn’t change the fact that I am beginning to second guess whether I have shot myself in the foot by adding in a few days of weight training so early on.
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So this week I had scheduled a deload week. In the spirit of recovery I have decided that instead of completing the sessions I had programmed, I am taking the entire week off. Still pushing 2500 calories everyday. Hopefully that is what I need to kick my body instead gear once again.
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I was told that the second cycle wait was worst than the first and initially i didn’t believe it. But I’m almost inclined to agree! Pray for me guys, I’m hoping something happens!
Hey hi hello it’s been a hot minuto since I have posted on here. I feel like I start every caption with that these days but I did want to post a lil update with what has been happening with my health. - About 6 weeks ago I excitedly posted about getting my menstrual cycle back after several years without it. I got myself into that mess by maintaining a body fat percentage that was too low and exercising too intensely for the amount of food I was eating. - Well, in all honesty it’s been 6 weeks and I am yet to have another period. Am I worried? I’d be lying if I said no. However I am also well aware that the chances of me miraculously falling back into a 28 day cycle were very low. It doesn’t change the fact that I am beginning to second guess whether I have shot myself in the foot by adding in a few days of weight training so early on. - So this week I had scheduled a deload week. In the spirit of recovery I have decided that instead of completing the sessions I had programmed, I am taking the entire week off. Still pushing 2500 calories everyday. Hopefully that is what I need to kick my body instead gear once again. - I was told that the second cycle wait was worst than the first and initially i didn’t believe it. But I’m almost inclined to agree! Pray for me guys, I’m hoping something happens!