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    Lucy McConnell
    @lucymcconnellfit

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“If you have to engage in extreme or disordered behaviours to maintain your weight, then it’s probably not a healthy weight for your body”
- Laura Thomas
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I thought I’d share a before, after and ‘after the after’ photo with you. My point is to show that fitness journeys are not as black and white as the classic #transformationtuesday photo that we have become so accustomed to. For me my lowest weight was not a healthy one. It was difficult to maintain and had me without a menstrual cycle, losing my hair, and incredibly anxious and anti social. As much as I occasionally look back on my old shredded days with nostalgia and longing, I know that putting my body through that all over again would be several steps back from the progress I have made this year in healing my body.
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The goal of fitness should not be to reach the smallest body you can. It should not be your final destination, the be all and end all. It’s hard for me to say this cause I am still working to believe it myself, but being fit and healthy does not come with the achievement of an aesthetic goal, or body fat percentage. It’s somewhere in that grey area called #balance that is not at all sexy or exciting. But it’s maintainable, and it means you can eat burgers weekly and drink wine and takes days or even weeks off the gym. It means you don’t have to track every morsel of food you eat and you can have a cappuccino instead of a long black. It means less anxiety and panic over food, and more spontaneous trips away and brunch dates. And to me all of that is worth not being the most shredded version of myself. So so worth it.
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Please don’t comment which one you like best. I don’t give a fuck.
“If you have to engage in extreme or disordered behaviours to maintain your weight, then it’s probably not a healthy weight for your body” - Laura Thomas - I thought I’d share a before, after and ‘after the after’ photo with you. My point is to show that fitness journeys are not as black and white as the classic #transformationtuesday  photo that we have become so accustomed to. For me my lowest weight was not a healthy one. It was difficult to maintain and had me without a menstrual cycle, losing my hair, and incredibly anxious and anti social. As much as I occasionally look back on my old shredded days with nostalgia and longing, I know that putting my body through that all over again would be several steps back from the progress I have made this year in healing my body. - The goal of fitness should not be to reach the smallest body you can. It should not be your final destination, the be all and end all. It’s hard for me to say this cause I am still working to believe it myself, but being fit and healthy does not come with the achievement of an aesthetic goal, or body fat percentage. It’s somewhere in that grey area called #balance  that is not at all sexy or exciting. But it’s maintainable, and it means you can eat burgers weekly and drink wine and takes days or even weeks off the gym. It means you don’t have to track every morsel of food you eat and you can have a cappuccino instead of a long black. It means less anxiety and panic over food, and more spontaneous trips away and brunch dates. And to me all of that is worth not being the most shredded version of myself. So so worth it. - Please don’t comment which one you like best. I don’t give a fuck.
I wanted to address on a touchy topic that has always bothered me, especially within the fitness social media bubble. I have spoken about it before on my page but a recent YouTube video that came up on my feed spurred me to re address it. It is that of over eating being mistakenly referred to as binge eating. The frequency with which the term 'bingeing' is thrown around in a nonchalant manner makes it seem as though almost everyone going through a dieting phase has binge eating disorder.
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For a period of time during my fitness journey I suffered through multiple binges. Whilst I would not consider myself as completely falling into having the disorder I can most definitely relate to the American National Eating Disorders definition of the illness as "recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge; experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards". I am all too familiar with the mental and physical discomfort of such episodes and it is a battle that I would not wish upon my worst enemy.
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Mindlessly eating an entire packet of chips whilst watching Netflix, or maybe helping yourself to one too many delicious treats at someone's birthday party or a family meal is not a binge. Christmas Day or Easter Sunday is not a binge. Going slightly off plan, or over on your macros for one day is not a binge. Bingeing is a serious disorder, and is a word that should not be thrown around lightly.
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I have noticed one too many youtubers and fitness instagrammers claim to have had a binge after eating an extra handful of nuts and another protein bar. This invalidates the struggle that many people go through daily. If you are still in control, you are simply choosing to over eat. If you are not in control, this is binge eating.
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If you feel as though you are suffering from binge eating disorder please seek help from a mental health professional. It is something that you can safely work through. Do not be afraid to ask for help.
#mentalhealthawareness #mentalhealthisimportant
I wanted to address on a touchy topic that has always bothered me, especially within the fitness social media bubble. I have spoken about it before on my page but a recent YouTube video that came up on my feed spurred me to re address it. It is that of over eating being mistakenly referred to as binge eating. The frequency with which the term 'bingeing' is thrown around in a nonchalant manner makes it seem as though almost everyone going through a dieting phase has binge eating disorder. - For a period of time during my fitness journey I suffered through multiple binges. Whilst I would not consider myself as completely falling into having the disorder I can most definitely relate to the American National Eating Disorders definition of the illness as "recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge; experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards". I am all too familiar with the mental and physical discomfort of such episodes and it is a battle that I would not wish upon my worst enemy. - Mindlessly eating an entire packet of chips whilst watching Netflix, or maybe helping yourself to one too many delicious treats at someone's birthday party or a family meal is not a binge. Christmas Day or Easter Sunday is not a binge. Going slightly off plan, or over on your macros for one day is not a binge. Bingeing is a serious disorder, and is a word that should not be thrown around lightly. - I have noticed one too many youtubers and fitness instagrammers claim to have had a binge after eating an extra handful of nuts and another protein bar. This invalidates the struggle that many people go through daily. If you are still in control, you are simply choosing to over eat. If you are not in control, this is binge eating. - If you feel as though you are suffering from binge eating disorder please seek help from a mental health professional. It is something that you can safely work through. Do not be afraid to ask for help. #mentalhealthawareness  #mentalhealthisimportant 
Spring kicks off this week in Australia (although you wouldn’t know it ❄️☁️) and for the first time in years I am not commencing a “summer shred”. This scares the shit out of me. I have spent the last five years of my life training my brain to believe there was only one acceptable summer body for me, one only attainable by putting myself through two months of low calorie misery.
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I’ve touched on this in a few posts recently but this year has been the year of reforming my perception of bodies, challenging my internalised fatphobia and asking myself why I place so much value on my body fat percentage. Truth is, I would never be critical of the size of the bodies of the people around me, especially those that are close to me so why would they give a shit about mine? I understand it’s not as simple as that, and many of us pursue leanness for reasons far beyond the opinions of others.
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I have found that challenging the social constructs that have shaped and manipulated your own thoughts is a good place to start. Consider the $60 billion diet industry that capitalises off making you feel like shit, that convinces you that being worthy is just one diet away. Think about the single idealised body type glamourised by the fashion industry, entertainment industry and on social media, all platforms that lack diversity in body type, skin colour, sexuality and ability. Question the social ideals that place more pressure on you as a female to fit societies ideals of thinness. Ask yourself why the pressure on you is far greater than the pressure placed on your male friends. Surround yourself with people (online and in person) who have different body types. Follow those with bodies bigger than you and who glow with self confidence and empowerment. Follow women who look just like you and have no desire to change their bodies. Let the beauty of their self love and acceptance allow you to challenge your self destructive inner monologue.
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I spent most of my life learning what I had to be and what I had to look like to be worthy of love. Now I am working to unlearn it. If only it was that simple.
Spring kicks off this week in Australia (although you wouldn’t know it ❄️☁️) and for the first time in years I am not commencing a “summer shred”. This scares the shit out of me. I have spent the last five years of my life training my brain to believe there was only one acceptable summer body for me, one only attainable by putting myself through two months of low calorie misery. - I’ve touched on this in a few posts recently but this year has been the year of reforming my perception of bodies, challenging my internalised fatphobia and asking myself why I place so much value on my body fat percentage. Truth is, I would never be critical of the size of the bodies of the people around me, especially those that are close to me so why would they give a shit about mine? I understand it’s not as simple as that, and many of us pursue leanness for reasons far beyond the opinions of others. - I have found that challenging the social constructs that have shaped and manipulated your own thoughts is a good place to start. Consider the $60 billion diet industry that capitalises off making you feel like shit, that convinces you that being worthy is just one diet away. Think about the single idealised body type glamourised by the fashion industry, entertainment industry and on social media, all platforms that lack diversity in body type, skin colour, sexuality and ability. Question the social ideals that place more pressure on you as a female to fit societies ideals of thinness. Ask yourself why the pressure on you is far greater than the pressure placed on your male friends. Surround yourself with people (online and in person) who have different body types. Follow those with bodies bigger than you and who glow with self confidence and empowerment. Follow women who look just like you and have no desire to change their bodies. Let the beauty of their self love and acceptance allow you to challenge your self destructive inner monologue. - I spent most of my life learning what I had to be and what I had to look like to be worthy of love. Now I am working to unlearn it. If only it was that simple.
Do I look like I lift yet?
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One of my biggest fears when I took 5 months off the gym this year was that I would lose all my muscle and not look #fitness anymore. A fear completely tied up in the destructive need to personally define and identify myself as the fit one, the one who lost all the weight. I did lose muscle when I took time off. I wasn’t surprised about that. What has surprised me is how quickly my body responded to training when I came back.
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Since being back in the gym I have regained all my muscle and possibly more. I have been able to consistently add weight to the bar every single week so I am now benching more than I ever did before. I have been shocked at the excess of energy I have had outside the gym, something I never had before. All this has been on a significantly lower volume program than I have EVER done before. I am training 3 days a week, 4 MAX. I am doing 75% of the amount of sets I used to, and 60% of the number of exercises per session. I am keeping it simple, and focusing on progressive overload. Rest is important. Recovery is essential to growth. Who would’ve thought (lol)
Do I look like I lift yet? - One of my biggest fears when I took 5 months off the gym this year was that I would lose all my muscle and not look #fitness  anymore. A fear completely tied up in the destructive need to personally define and identify myself as the fit one, the one who lost all the weight. I did lose muscle when I took time off. I wasn’t surprised about that. What has surprised me is how quickly my body responded to training when I came back. - Since being back in the gym I have regained all my muscle and possibly more. I have been able to consistently add weight to the bar every single week so I am now benching more than I ever did before. I have been shocked at the excess of energy I have had outside the gym, something I never had before. All this has been on a significantly lower volume program than I have EVER done before. I am training 3 days a week, 4 MAX. I am doing 75% of the amount of sets I used to, and 60% of the number of exercises per session. I am keeping it simple, and focusing on progressive overload. Rest is important. Recovery is essential to growth. Who would’ve thought (lol)
Happy Friday friends 👋🏽👋🏽
Happy Friday friends 👋🏽👋🏽
For the majority of this year my Instagram posts have been dominated by me documenting my recovery from Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (HA). I shared my process of eating alllll the foods and significantly cutting my exercise (so that I was not doing ANY at all) which after a 6 month journey resulted in me getting my first period in several years.
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The reason that I am still harping on about this is because I believe HA is something that is very easy to prevent if only there was a bit more awareness about it. Truth is, basic information about HA is out there, but nothing that is actually very helpful for someone who has recently been diagnosed with it.
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HA manifests itself in one of two ways. The first is in women who are normal to low weight, and undereat/overexercise to a BMI anywhere from 21 on down. The second happens in women who were overweight to begin with, then lost a significant amount of weight; in some cases going to low BMIs as well. If you fit either of these categories it is worth being aware of the potential damage you have caused to your body. To get into the science of it I have taken an except from a blog post by Nicola Rinaldi (Author of “No Period, Now What”) to explain it further.
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“In HA, what happens is that as the body goes into a semi starvation mode with a constant energy deficit due to the undereating/overexercising, leptin levels decrease (see Welt CK et al.). This then leads to decreases in the levels and pulsatile frequency of LH, and estradiol, and the natural hormonal cycle stops. Increases in eating, particularly in carbohydrates and fats (good and bad) restore the natural leptin levels within a reasonable amount of time - usually 6 months to a year after making wholehearted changes (in many cases cycles are restored even more quickly than that; the quicker the weight is gained, the more quickly the cycles return).”
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If you have been suffering from HA (I know there are a lot of you out there following along) read widely and be open to the realities of recovering your cycle. It is highly likely it will contain weight gain and decreases in training.
CONTINUED IN COMMENTS 👇🏼
For the majority of this year my Instagram posts have been dominated by me documenting my recovery from Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (HA). I shared my process of eating alllll the foods and significantly cutting my exercise (so that I was not doing ANY at all) which after a 6 month journey resulted in me getting my first period in several years. - The reason that I am still harping on about this is because I believe HA is something that is very easy to prevent if only there was a bit more awareness about it. Truth is, basic information about HA is out there, but nothing that is actually very helpful for someone who has recently been diagnosed with it. - HA manifests itself in one of two ways. The first is in women who are normal to low weight, and undereat/overexercise to a BMI anywhere from 21 on down. The second happens in women who were overweight to begin with, then lost a significant amount of weight; in some cases going to low BMIs as well. If you fit either of these categories it is worth being aware of the potential damage you have caused to your body. To get into the science of it I have taken an except from a blog post by Nicola Rinaldi (Author of “No Period, Now What”) to explain it further. - “In HA, what happens is that as the body goes into a semi starvation mode with a constant energy deficit due to the undereating/overexercising, leptin levels decrease (see Welt CK et al.). This then leads to decreases in the levels and pulsatile frequency of LH, and estradiol, and the natural hormonal cycle stops. Increases in eating, particularly in carbohydrates and fats (good and bad) restore the natural leptin levels within a reasonable amount of time - usually 6 months to a year after making wholehearted changes (in many cases cycles are restored even more quickly than that; the quicker the weight is gained, the more quickly the cycles return).” - If you have been suffering from HA (I know there are a lot of you out there following along) read widely and be open to the realities of recovering your cycle. It is highly likely it will contain weight gain and decreases in training. CONTINUED IN COMMENTS 👇🏼
Whenever you have a bad feeling about your body or appearance, ask yourself “who profits off this emotion?”
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#wednesdaywisdom
Whenever you have a bad feeling about your body or appearance, ask yourself “who profits off this emotion?” - #wednesdaywisdom 
When talking about weight stigma in relation to the female body one can almost suggest that there are two different areas that need attention. The first is the existence of institutionalised fatphobia. That is, the attitudes, behaviors, and societal structures that prioritize thinness over fatness and make life easier for thin people. When it comes to this fatphobia, I would argue that apart from pledging to be an ally to people in larger bodies, the thin privileged should learn how to shut up and listen.
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There is another element of weight stigma that affects everyone, that does not discriminate between fat and skinny and that is deeply wrapped up in sexism. That element is internalized fatphobia. It’s that driving knowledge that your body is not worthy and never will be, that you’re fat and ugly, and that causes you to treat your body in horrific ways. While this type of body shame does apply to men as well, in many ways it’s wrapped up in the conviction that women’s appearance is the most important thing about them, the idea that women’s bodies don’t belong to themselves, and the underlying message that women should always be taking up less space.
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Over the last 6 months I have been forced to accept the challenge of accepting and embracing weight gain, more specifically fat gain. In doing so I have become acutely aware with my own ingrained fatphobia that I was previously not privy to. I realise that by regularly publishing photos of my past self, who was larger and had more fat and comparing it to my more recent, thinner and socially acceptable self I was creating an attitude towards myself that a thinner me is a better me. The old me was not worthy of love, and the new thinner me is. This attitude generated a highly toxic mental state for me to embark on my weight gain and recovery journey, something I have had to address everyday.
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I don’t have a solution or any inspiring words. I just wanted to prompt you to consider why fat is bad. Why we are conditioned to believe that smaller is better. And what you think you will gain by being a smaller version of yourself. Where does it all come from?
When talking about weight stigma in relation to the female body one can almost suggest that there are two different areas that need attention. The first is the existence of institutionalised fatphobia. That is, the attitudes, behaviors, and societal structures that prioritize thinness over fatness and make life easier for thin people. When it comes to this fatphobia, I would argue that apart from pledging to be an ally to people in larger bodies, the thin privileged should learn how to shut up and listen. - There is another element of weight stigma that affects everyone, that does not discriminate between fat and skinny and that is deeply wrapped up in sexism. That element is internalized fatphobia. It’s that driving knowledge that your body is not worthy and never will be, that you’re fat and ugly, and that causes you to treat your body in horrific ways. While this type of body shame does apply to men as well, in many ways it’s wrapped up in the conviction that women’s appearance is the most important thing about them, the idea that women’s bodies don’t belong to themselves, and the underlying message that women should always be taking up less space. - Over the last 6 months I have been forced to accept the challenge of accepting and embracing weight gain, more specifically fat gain. In doing so I have become acutely aware with my own ingrained fatphobia that I was previously not privy to. I realise that by regularly publishing photos of my past self, who was larger and had more fat and comparing it to my more recent, thinner and socially acceptable self I was creating an attitude towards myself that a thinner me is a better me. The old me was not worthy of love, and the new thinner me is. This attitude generated a highly toxic mental state for me to embark on my weight gain and recovery journey, something I have had to address everyday. - I don’t have a solution or any inspiring words. I just wanted to prompt you to consider why fat is bad. Why we are conditioned to believe that smaller is better. And what you think you will gain by being a smaller version of yourself. Where does it all come from?
An oldie but a goodie.
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Who has been here since my old pink wall days?
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#throwbackthursday
An oldie but a goodie. - Who has been here since my old pink wall days? - #throwbackthursday 
Hey hi hello it’s been a hot minuto since I have posted on here. I feel like I start every caption with that these days but I did want to post a lil update with what has been happening with my health.
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About 6 weeks ago I excitedly posted about getting my menstrual cycle back after several years without it. I got myself into that mess by maintaining a body fat percentage that was too low and exercising too intensely for the amount of food I was eating.
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Well, in all honesty it’s been 6 weeks and I am yet to have another period. Am I worried? I’d be lying if I said no. However I am also well aware that the chances of me miraculously falling back into a 28 day cycle were very low. It doesn’t change the fact that I am beginning to second guess whether I have shot myself in the foot by adding in a few days of weight training so early on.
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So this week I had scheduled a deload week. In the spirit of recovery I have decided that instead of completing the sessions I had programmed, I am taking the entire week off. Still pushing 2500 calories everyday. Hopefully that is what I need to kick my body instead gear once again.
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I was told that the second cycle wait was worst than the first and initially i didn’t believe it. But I’m almost inclined to agree! Pray for me guys, I’m hoping something happens!
Hey hi hello it’s been a hot minuto since I have posted on here. I feel like I start every caption with that these days but I did want to post a lil update with what has been happening with my health. - About 6 weeks ago I excitedly posted about getting my menstrual cycle back after several years without it. I got myself into that mess by maintaining a body fat percentage that was too low and exercising too intensely for the amount of food I was eating. - Well, in all honesty it’s been 6 weeks and I am yet to have another period. Am I worried? I’d be lying if I said no. However I am also well aware that the chances of me miraculously falling back into a 28 day cycle were very low. It doesn’t change the fact that I am beginning to second guess whether I have shot myself in the foot by adding in a few days of weight training so early on. - So this week I had scheduled a deload week. In the spirit of recovery I have decided that instead of completing the sessions I had programmed, I am taking the entire week off. Still pushing 2500 calories everyday. Hopefully that is what I need to kick my body instead gear once again. - I was told that the second cycle wait was worst than the first and initially i didn’t believe it. But I’m almost inclined to agree! Pray for me guys, I’m hoping something happens!
So I’ve got my period back. Now what?
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This is a question that was floating around in my mind throughout my entire recovery journey. Admittedly at the start my mentality was “I just want my period back ASAP so I can go back to ‘normal’”. Probably not the best attitude as my ‘normal’ was what got me into this shitstorm in the first place. My understanding is that some women who have recovered from hypothalamic amenorrhea have gone on to continue to train hard, some at an elite level whilst others have had to significantly reconsider their training volume to better suit their now fertile and menstruating bodies. So it is evident that I have some trial and error ahead of me to figure out exactly where my body’s ‘happy place’ is in regard to exercise. So what’s my plan going forward:
1️⃣ Food: my plan is to continue eating minimum 2500 calories a day indefinitely. My body weight has stabilised at this intake and I am loving the freedom it has given me around food. I am still intuitively eating and have been enjoying going out for meals and experimenting with more creative meals at home.
2️⃣ Exercise: this is one I am really trying to ease myself into. Until I have three consecutive periods I am not considering myself fully recovered so I need to ensure I am still creating a stress free environment for my body to do it’s thing. I have been back in the gym, however I have been significantly limiting my volume. I am there no more than 2-3 days a week and am doing less sets and significantly fewer exercises than I previously did. After I have had three periods I will experiment with perhaps another day or two of training, but I will of course have to ensure I am eating enough to fuel this increase in expenditure.
3️⃣ body composition: for me I got my period pretty much as soon as I hit the ‘fertile’ BMI of 22. It seems as though this is my body’s set point and it is quite happily maintaining without me really having to do much. Although it’s a higher body fat percentage than what I once was I’m happy with the way I look. In fact, my body composition is no longer something I find myself criticising or even noticing.
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Pray for me guys 🤞🏽 I’ll let you know how I go
So I’ve got my period back. Now what? - This is a question that was floating around in my mind throughout my entire recovery journey. Admittedly at the start my mentality was “I just want my period back ASAP so I can go back to ‘normal’”. Probably not the best attitude as my ‘normal’ was what got me into this shitstorm in the first place. My understanding is that some women who have recovered from hypothalamic amenorrhea have gone on to continue to train hard, some at an elite level whilst others have had to significantly reconsider their training volume to better suit their now fertile and menstruating bodies. So it is evident that I have some trial and error ahead of me to figure out exactly where my body’s ‘happy place’ is in regard to exercise. So what’s my plan going forward: 1️⃣ Food: my plan is to continue eating minimum 2500 calories a day indefinitely. My body weight has stabilised at this intake and I am loving the freedom it has given me around food. I am still intuitively eating and have been enjoying going out for meals and experimenting with more creative meals at home. 2️⃣ Exercise: this is one I am really trying to ease myself into. Until I have three consecutive periods I am not considering myself fully recovered so I need to ensure I am still creating a stress free environment for my body to do it’s thing. I have been back in the gym, however I have been significantly limiting my volume. I am there no more than 2-3 days a week and am doing less sets and significantly fewer exercises than I previously did. After I have had three periods I will experiment with perhaps another day or two of training, but I will of course have to ensure I am eating enough to fuel this increase in expenditure. 3️⃣ body composition: for me I got my period pretty much as soon as I hit the ‘fertile’ BMI of 22. It seems as though this is my body’s set point and it is quite happily maintaining without me really having to do much. Although it’s a higher body fat percentage than what I once was I’m happy with the way I look. In fact, my body composition is no longer something I find myself criticising or even noticing. - Pray for me guys 🤞🏽 I’ll let you know how I go
I made a pretty excited post yesterday about getting my first period in a long long time. I thought it would be appropriate to follow up with a post explaining everything I tried to get it back and what ACTUALLY worked.
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1️⃣ My first attempt was my gut health/paleo phase. I’m not sure what made me think this was my solution. I think it had to do with a certain YouTuber I was religiously following. Long story short: that didn’t work ❌.
2️⃣ Around the same time I started to see a naturopath. I am not knocking natural medicine and I do believe it has an important role to play. However for me, I placed all my faith in naturopathy to heal me, I took all the herbal supplements and spent well over $1500 on it with no success. I should emphasise that I had been off the naturopath medicines for 5 weeks when I finally got a period so I can safely say they weren’t a significant contributor. ❌
3️⃣ Essential oils. I was getting desperate at this point. Again, not knocking them but at this stage I was STILL failing to see the bigger picture. Essential oils weren’t gonna override the real issue - a body fat percentage that was too low. ❌
4️⃣ Stopping training. This was a massive positive step for me, it happened in the first week of February. It was when I did this that I began to see positive hormonal changes in my body. However, for much of this stage I was still engaging in some degree of calorie restriction. Yes I was eating relatively high calories (2200 on average), however I was not listening to my body’s hunger cues and as I found later, was not eating anywhere near enough. ✅❌
5️⃣ I owe all my success in getting my period back to the @noperiodnowwhat approach. This approach advocates for a daily calorie intake of 2500-3000 calories minimum. No exercise at all and an effort to improve your reactionship with food and your body. Exactly 1 month TO THE DAY after I commenced this method I got a period. It works. Its hard. It sucked a lot some times but I have full faith in the process. ✅✅✅✅
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If you are also struggling with not having a period I highly recommend you check out the book. My DMs are always open for any one who is after any advice or encouragement!
I made a pretty excited post yesterday about getting my first period in a long long time. I thought it would be appropriate to follow up with a post explaining everything I tried to get it back and what ACTUALLY worked. - 1️⃣ My first attempt was my gut health/paleo phase. I’m not sure what made me think this was my solution. I think it had to do with a certain YouTuber I was religiously following. Long story short: that didn’t work ❌. 2️⃣ Around the same time I started to see a naturopath. I am not knocking natural medicine and I do believe it has an important role to play. However for me, I placed all my faith in naturopathy to heal me, I took all the herbal supplements and spent well over $1500 on it with no success. I should emphasise that I had been off the naturopath medicines for 5 weeks when I finally got a period so I can safely say they weren’t a significant contributor. ❌ 3️⃣ Essential oils. I was getting desperate at this point. Again, not knocking them but at this stage I was STILL failing to see the bigger picture. Essential oils weren’t gonna override the real issue - a body fat percentage that was too low. ❌ 4️⃣ Stopping training. This was a massive positive step for me, it happened in the first week of February. It was when I did this that I began to see positive hormonal changes in my body. However, for much of this stage I was still engaging in some degree of calorie restriction. Yes I was eating relatively high calories (2200 on average), however I was not listening to my body’s hunger cues and as I found later, was not eating anywhere near enough. ✅❌ 5️⃣ I owe all my success in getting my period back to the @noperiodnowwhat approach. This approach advocates for a daily calorie intake of 2500-3000 calories minimum. No exercise at all and an effort to improve your reactionship with food and your body. Exactly 1 month TO THE DAY after I commenced this method I got a period. It works. Its hard. It sucked a lot some times but I have full faith in the process. ✅✅✅✅ - If you are also struggling with not having a period I highly recommend you check out the book. My DMs are always open for any one who is after any advice or encouragement!
GUYS GUESS WHAT?! I GOT A PERIOD. It’s been a bloody long time since I’ve had a natural period (over 5 years) and just over a year since I’ve been off the pill. I am so so stoked that I have been able to heal myself through fuelling my body and letting it rest. It’s been 4 weeks since I went “all in” eating 3000 calories a day and not exercising AT ALL. I trusted the process and it paid off. No fancy supplements or strict diets. Just more food, less exercise and a healthy increase in body fat.
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Have a happy Monday friends, I hope it is half as good as mine 😁😁😁
GUYS GUESS WHAT?! I GOT A PERIOD. It’s been a bloody long time since I’ve had a natural period (over 5 years) and just over a year since I’ve been off the pill. I am so so stoked that I have been able to heal myself through fuelling my body and letting it rest. It’s been 4 weeks since I went “all in” eating 3000 calories a day and not exercising AT ALL. I trusted the process and it paid off. No fancy supplements or strict diets. Just more food, less exercise and a healthy increase in body fat. - Have a happy Monday friends, I hope it is half as good as mine 😁😁😁
“how you love yourself is
how you teach others
to love you”
- Rupi Kaur
“how you love yourself is how you teach others to love you” - Rupi Kaur
“A culture fixated on female thinness is not an obsession about female beauty, but an obsession about female obedience. Dieting is the most potent political sedative in women’s history; a quietly mad population is a tractable one.”
- Naomi Wolf.
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Since starting my journey of amenorrhea recovery I have had time to invest in educating myself and reading into other areas of interest. A topic that I have found myself heavily invested in is this idea of diet culture. I have found it truely fascinating to be able to step back and observe how this obsession with female thinness had truly permeated every corner of my life to the point where I had completely normalised it. I am still learning and am yet to form a solid opinion on it but for now I urge you to question the constructs that make you feel the way you do about your appearance. Why is thin the number one goal? Why is thin the only version of beautiful? And why is this pressure only placed on women’s shoulders? #dietculture
“A culture fixated on female thinness is not an obsession about female beauty, but an obsession about female obedience. Dieting is the most potent political sedative in women’s history; a quietly mad population is a tractable one.” - Naomi Wolf. - Since starting my journey of amenorrhea recovery I have had time to invest in educating myself and reading into other areas of interest. A topic that I have found myself heavily invested in is this idea of diet culture. I have found it truely fascinating to be able to step back and observe how this obsession with female thinness had truly permeated every corner of my life to the point where I had completely normalised it. I am still learning and am yet to form a solid opinion on it but for now I urge you to question the constructs that make you feel the way you do about your appearance. Why is thin the number one goal? Why is thin the only version of beautiful? And why is this pressure only placed on women’s shoulders? #dietculture 
Made redundant at one job and hired at another on the same day #talkabouttiming #f45
I have been real slack with the insta posting of late. To be honest I feel like I am all captioned out and I’ve had a lot on my plate that has all felt more important than instagram, like shovelling 3000 calories down my throat on a daily basis. If you haven’t been following my recovery process, I have been trying to recover from hypothalamic amenorrhea, or loss of menstrual cycle for some time now. I have been out of the gym for roughly 5 months and about two weeks ago I chose to go “all in” committing to gaining minimum 5kg and eat 2500-3000 calories a day (more on this in my ‘amenorrhea’ story highlight). Whilst I have nothing new to report on the period front, there have been several other changes and improvements I have noticed over the past 5 months. In the spirit of focusing on the positives, I thought I would touch on a few of them.
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1️⃣ Hair. Some 6 months ago I thought that bed sheets full of fallen out hair were normal. I thought that everyone lost large amounts of hair every time they brushed it. It is only now that I have some wonderfully awkward looking tufts of hair growing back (if you look real close at this photo you can see some) that I realise that what I was dealing with was not at all normal!
2️⃣ Digestion. Same thing goes for this. I had spent so long dealing with abnormal digestion that I had come to believe it was normal for me. Even foods I believed I was ‘intolerant’ to I can now eat with no problem at all.
3️⃣ Anxiety and mental health. Before I chose to recover my period I was struggling big time with anxiety, especially around social situations and those that involved food. The last fortnight especially has shown me this amazing freedom that I can have around food. It has become something social and enjoyable and my anxiety has not reared it’s head in several weeks.
4️⃣ Greater body acceptance and self love. This one is not always easy for me. However, this whole process has really driven home the idea that I care more for my health than for any aesthetic look. I do have my days but the majority of the time I find myself appreciating that my boobs no longer look like the chest of a ten year old boy.
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CONTINUED IN COMMENTS
I have been real slack with the insta posting of late. To be honest I feel like I am all captioned out and I’ve had a lot on my plate that has all felt more important than instagram, like shovelling 3000 calories down my throat on a daily basis. If you haven’t been following my recovery process, I have been trying to recover from hypothalamic amenorrhea, or loss of menstrual cycle for some time now. I have been out of the gym for roughly 5 months and about two weeks ago I chose to go “all in” committing to gaining minimum 5kg and eat 2500-3000 calories a day (more on this in my ‘amenorrhea’ story highlight). Whilst I have nothing new to report on the period front, there have been several other changes and improvements I have noticed over the past 5 months. In the spirit of focusing on the positives, I thought I would touch on a few of them. - 1️⃣ Hair. Some 6 months ago I thought that bed sheets full of fallen out hair were normal. I thought that everyone lost large amounts of hair every time they brushed it. It is only now that I have some wonderfully awkward looking tufts of hair growing back (if you look real close at this photo you can see some) that I realise that what I was dealing with was not at all normal! 2️⃣ Digestion. Same thing goes for this. I had spent so long dealing with abnormal digestion that I had come to believe it was normal for me. Even foods I believed I was ‘intolerant’ to I can now eat with no problem at all. 3️⃣ Anxiety and mental health. Before I chose to recover my period I was struggling big time with anxiety, especially around social situations and those that involved food. The last fortnight especially has shown me this amazing freedom that I can have around food. It has become something social and enjoyable and my anxiety has not reared it’s head in several weeks. 4️⃣ Greater body acceptance and self love. This one is not always easy for me. However, this whole process has really driven home the idea that I care more for my health than for any aesthetic look. I do have my days but the majority of the time I find myself appreciating that my boobs no longer look like the chest of a ten year old boy. - CONTINUED IN COMMENTS