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Sometimes we have thoughts that even we don’t understand. Thoughts that aren’t even true—that aren’t really how we feel—but they’re running through our heads anyway because they’re interesting to think about.

If you could hear other people’s thoughts, you’d overhear things that are true as well as things that are completely random. And you wouldn’t know one from the other. It’d drive you insane. What’s true? What’s not? A million ideas, but what do they mean?

That’s what I love about poetry. The more abstract, the better. The stuff where you’re not sure what the poet’s talking about. You may have an idea, but you can’t be sure. Not a hundred percent. Each word, specifically chosen, could have a million different meanings. Is it a stand-in—a symbol—for another idea? 
Does it fit into a larger, more hidden, metaphor?
Did the poet use red to symbolize blood? Anger? Lust? Or is the wheelbarrow simply red because red sounded better than black?

Jay Asher, Thirteen Reasons Why
Sometimes we have thoughts that even we don’t understand. Thoughts that aren’t even true—that aren’t really how we feel—but they’re running through our heads anyway because they’re interesting to think about. If you could hear other people’s thoughts, you’d overhear things that are true as well as things that are completely random. And you wouldn’t know one from the other. It’d drive you insane. What’s true? What’s not? A million ideas, but what do they mean? That’s what I love about poetry. The more abstract, the better. The stuff where you’re not sure what the poet’s talking about. You may have an idea, but you can’t be sure. Not a hundred percent. Each word, specifically chosen, could have a million different meanings. Is it a stand-in—a symbol—for another idea? Does it fit into a larger, more hidden, metaphor? Did the poet use red to symbolize blood? Anger? Lust? Or is the wheelbarrow simply red because red sounded better than black? Jay Asher, Thirteen Reasons Why
phase
fāz/
noun: a distinct period or stage in a process of change or forming part of something's development.
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0616
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#magicshop
phase fāz/ noun: a distinct period or stage in a process of change or forming part of something's development. - 0616 - #magicshop 
Recent status: 23, still alive
Recent status: 23, still alive
Clara, 22 tahun.
Lahir pada tanggal 2 juni, anak kedua dari 2 bersaudara, memiliki 2 keponakan berselisih usia 2 tahun. Berzodiak gemini dengan simbol ♊ yang berarti angka II romawi.
Clara, 22 tahun. Lahir pada tanggal 2 juni, anak kedua dari 2 bersaudara, memiliki 2 keponakan berselisih usia 2 tahun. Berzodiak gemini dengan simbol ♊ yang berarti angka II romawi.
Chapter 7 Eva
‌ "Love must not entreat or demand. Love must have the strength to become certain within itself. Then it ceases merely to be attracted and begins to attract. Sinclair, your love is attracted to me. Once it begins to attract me, I will come."
Hermann Hesse, Demian
#serendipity #eva #mother
Chapter 7 Eva ‌ "Love must not entreat or demand. Love must have the strength to become certain within itself. Then it ceases merely to be attracted and begins to attract. Sinclair, your love is attracted to me. Once it begins to attract me, I will come." Hermann Hesse, Demian #serendipity  #eva  #mother 
Chapter 7 Eva
‌There he lay on the shore, shattered. He had not understood how to love. If at the instant of leaping he had had the strength of faith in the fulfillment of his love he would have soared into the heights and been united with the star.
‌Hermann Hesse, Demian
#serendipity
Chapter 7 Eva ‌There he lay on the shore, shattered. He had not understood how to love. If at the instant of leaping he had had the strength of faith in the fulfillment of his love he would have soared into the heights and been united with the star. ‌Hermann Hesse, Demian #serendipity 
"Once he stood again on the high cliff at night by the sea and gazed at the planet and burned with love for it. And at the height of his longing he leaped into the emptiness toward the planet, but at the instant of leaping "it's impossible" flashed once more through his mind."
‌Hermann Hesse, Demian
‌‌#serendipity
"Once he stood again on the high cliff at night by the sea and gazed at the planet and burned with love for it. And at the height of his longing he leaped into the emptiness toward the planet, but at the instant of leaping "it's impossible" flashed once more through his mind." ‌Hermann Hesse, Demian ‌‌#serendipity 
"He considered it to be his fate to love a heavenly body without any hope of fulfillment and out of this insight he constructed an entire philosophy of renunciation and silent, faithful suffering that would improve and purify him."
‌Hermann Hesse, Demian
‌#serendipity
"He considered it to be his fate to love a heavenly body without any hope of fulfillment and out of this insight he constructed an entire philosophy of renunciation and silent, faithful suffering that would improve and purify him." ‌Hermann Hesse, Demian ‌#serendipity 
Chapter 7 Eva
"Let me tell you a story." And she told me about a boy who had fallen in love with a planet.
He stood by the sea, stretched out his arms and prayed to the planet, dreamed of it, and directed all his thoughts to it. But he knew, that a star cannot be embraced by a human being."
Hermann Hesse, Demian
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#dna
#serendipity vs #singularity
Chapter 7 Eva "Let me tell you a story." And she told me about a boy who had fallen in love with a planet. He stood by the sea, stretched out his arms and prayed to the planet, dreamed of it, and directed all his thoughts to it. But he knew, that a star cannot be embraced by a human being." Hermann Hesse, Demian . #dna  #serendipity  vs #singularity 
But in the end, spring will come someday
The ice will melt and flow away
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#singularity #v #loveyourself_轉_tear
#springday
‌"They go on. They leave, they walk ahead into the darkness, and they do not come back."
‌Ursula Le guin
#springday
‌"They go on. They leave, they walk ahead into the darkness, and they do not come back." ‌Ursula Le guin #springday 
.
u·to·pi·a
/yo͞oˈtōpēə/
.
an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect that has been designed so there are no problems.
Society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens.
. u·to·pi·a /yo͞oˈtōpēə/ . an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect that has been designed so there are no problems. Society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens.
"Often the young people go home in tears, when they have seen the child and faced this terrible paradox. But as time goes on they begin to realize that even if the child could be released, It is too degraded and imbecile to know any real joy. It has been afraid too long ever to be free of fear. Indeed, after so long it would probably be wretched without walls about it to protect it, and darkness for its eyes, and its own excrement to sit in. Now do you believe in them? Are they not more credible? But there is one more thing to tell, and this is quite incredible."
Ursula Le Guin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas
"Often the young people go home in tears, when they have seen the child and faced this terrible paradox. But as time goes on they begin to realize that even if the child could be released, It is too degraded and imbecile to know any real joy. It has been afraid too long ever to be free of fear. Indeed, after so long it would probably be wretched without walls about it to protect it, and darkness for its eyes, and its own excrement to sit in. Now do you believe in them? Are they not more credible? But there is one more thing to tell, and this is quite incredible." Ursula Le Guin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas
"No matter how well the matter has been explained to them, they are always shocked and sickened at the sight. They feel disgust, which they had thought themselves superior to. They would like to do something for the child. But there is nothing they can do. If the child were brought up into the sunlight out of that vile place, that would be a good thing indeed; but if it were done, in that day and hour all the prosperity and beauty and delight of Omelas would wither and be destroyed.
‌Those are the terms. To exchange all the goodness and grace of every life in Omelas to throw away the happiness of thousands for the chance of the happiness of one."
Ursula Le Guin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas
"No matter how well the matter has been explained to them, they are always shocked and sickened at the sight. They feel disgust, which they had thought themselves superior to. They would like to do something for the child. But there is nothing they can do. If the child were brought up into the sunlight out of that vile place, that would be a good thing indeed; but if it were done, in that day and hour all the prosperity and beauty and delight of Omelas would wither and be destroyed. ‌Those are the terms. To exchange all the goodness and grace of every life in Omelas to throw away the happiness of thousands for the chance of the happiness of one." Ursula Le Guin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas
"It is so thin there are no calves to its legs; its belly protrudes; it lives on a half-bowl of corn meal and grease a day. It is naked. Its buttocks and thighs are a mass of festered sores, as it sits in its own excrement continually.
‌They all know it is there, all the people of Omelas. Some of them have come to see it, others are content merely to know it is there. They all know that it has to be there. Some of them understand why, and some do not, but they all understand that their happiness, the beauty of their city, the tenderness of their friendships, the health of their children, the wisdom of their scholars, the skill of their makers, even the abundance of their harvest and the kindly weathers of their skies, depend wholly on this child's abominable misery."
Ursula Le Guin
"It is so thin there are no calves to its legs; its belly protrudes; it lives on a half-bowl of corn meal and grease a day. It is naked. Its buttocks and thighs are a mass of festered sores, as it sits in its own excrement continually. ‌They all know it is there, all the people of Omelas. Some of them have come to see it, others are content merely to know it is there. They all know that it has to be there. Some of them understand why, and some do not, but they all understand that their happiness, the beauty of their city, the tenderness of their friendships, the health of their children, the wisdom of their scholars, the skill of their makers, even the abundance of their harvest and the kindly weathers of their skies, depend wholly on this child's abominable misery." Ursula Le Guin
"In a basement under one of the beautiful public buildings of Omelas, there is a room. It has one locked door, and no window. A little light seeps in dustily between cracks in the boards. The floor is dirt, as cellar dirt usually is. In the room a child is sitting. It could be a boy or a girl. It looks about six, but actually is nearly ten. It is feeble-minded. Perhaps it was born defective, or perhaps it has become imbecile through fear, malnutrition, and neglect.
‌The door is always locked; and nobody ever comes, except that sometimes the door rattles terribly and opens, and a person, or several people, are there. One of them may come in and kick the child to make it stand up. The others never come close, but peer in at it with frightened, disgusted eyes. The people at the door never say anything, but the child, who has not always lived in the tool room, and can remember sunlight and its mother's voice, sometimes speaks. "I will be good," it says. "Please let me out. I will be good!" They never answer. The child used to scream for help at night, and cry a good deal, but now it only makes a kind of whining, and it speaks less and less often."
Ursula Le Guin
"In a basement under one of the beautiful public buildings of Omelas, there is a room. It has one locked door, and no window. A little light seeps in dustily between cracks in the boards. The floor is dirt, as cellar dirt usually is. In the room a child is sitting. It could be a boy or a girl. It looks about six, but actually is nearly ten. It is feeble-minded. Perhaps it was born defective, or perhaps it has become imbecile through fear, malnutrition, and neglect. ‌The door is always locked; and nobody ever comes, except that sometimes the door rattles terribly and opens, and a person, or several people, are there. One of them may come in and kick the child to make it stand up. The others never come close, but peer in at it with frightened, disgusted eyes. The people at the door never say anything, but the child, who has not always lived in the tool room, and can remember sunlight and its mother's voice, sometimes speaks. "I will be good," it says. "Please let me out. I will be good!" They never answer. The child used to scream for help at night, and cry a good deal, but now it only makes a kind of whining, and it speaks less and less often." Ursula Le Guin
"One thing I know there is none of in Omelas is guilt. But what else should there be? What else, what else belongs in the joyous city? The sense of victory, surely, the celebration of courage.
‌Do you believe? Do you accept the festival, the city, the joy? No? Then let me describe one more thing."
Ursula Le Guin
"One thing I know there is none of in Omelas is guilt. But what else should there be? What else, what else belongs in the joyous city? The sense of victory, surely, the celebration of courage. ‌Do you believe? Do you accept the festival, the city, the joy? No? Then let me describe one more thing." Ursula Le Guin