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In 2007, I read about a Finnish female triathlete, Tiina Boman, and I was amazed. Back then, I was a tall and skinny girl, who had no muscles and no endurance fitness whatsoever. Motivated by her, I got some Triathlon magazines, bought Triathlete´s Training Bible, and enrolled in a swim training group. I started jogging around the blocks and bought my first bike. I had no clue how to ride with cleats. Once, I even got so scared as a car passed me that I rode off the street and as I was unable to clip myself off, I fell flat on my face in the gutter.

But I was motivated, and in July 2008, I did my first Sprint Triathlon. I remember being so stoked!

After this, I was living and loving my swim-bike-run-life, but at the end of 2009 things started to change: I had problems breathing, had fevers, rashes and was feeling unwell, but no doctor seemed to be able to pinpoint what was wrong with me. Then, urged by my physiotherapist, I saw a neurologist, who eventually found out what was wrong with me. In July 2010, I was diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). The first years with lupus were tough. I had severe episodes and my kidneys weren´t working properly. Also, my heart is affected and needs monitoring. I was told that I would never be able to do Triathlon again. But being a very stubborn person, I refused to accept it. I started to look for alternatives to gain my health back and with the help of some amazing people, I started my crawl back to health, slowly but surely.

In 2015, I raced again. It was a local Sprint Triathlon, and I came 2nd in my AG. This sparked my motivation. I knew that, although I had to live my life with lupus, I could do this.

This year, I finished 3rd in my AG at the Finnish Half-distance Championships. In 2019, I will be racing the Challenge Championship for the third time. And, I plan to do my first Ironman in 2020!

Do not let anyone tell you that you can´t do something. Go ahead. You are stronger than you think! ~ Pia Vakkilainen [@piav_tri]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Pia! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
In 2007, I read about a Finnish female triathlete, Tiina Boman, and I was amazed. Back then, I was a tall and skinny girl, who had no muscles and no endurance fitness whatsoever. Motivated by her, I got some Triathlon magazines, bought Triathlete´s Training Bible, and enrolled in a swim training group. I started jogging around the blocks and bought my first bike. I had no clue how to ride with cleats. Once, I even got so scared as a car passed me that I rode off the street and as I was unable to clip myself off, I fell flat on my face in the gutter. But I was motivated, and in July 2008, I did my first Sprint Triathlon. I remember being so stoked! After this, I was living and loving my swim-bike-run-life, but at the end of 2009 things started to change: I had problems breathing, had fevers, rashes and was feeling unwell, but no doctor seemed to be able to pinpoint what was wrong with me. Then, urged by my physiotherapist, I saw a neurologist, who eventually found out what was wrong with me. In July 2010, I was diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). The first years with lupus were tough. I had severe episodes and my kidneys weren´t working properly. Also, my heart is affected and needs monitoring. I was told that I would never be able to do Triathlon again. But being a very stubborn person, I refused to accept it. I started to look for alternatives to gain my health back and with the help of some amazing people, I started my crawl back to health, slowly but surely. In 2015, I raced again. It was a local Sprint Triathlon, and I came 2nd in my AG. This sparked my motivation. I knew that, although I had to live my life with lupus, I could do this. This year, I finished 3rd in my AG at the Finnish Half-distance Championships. In 2019, I will be racing the Challenge Championship for the third time. And, I plan to do my first Ironman in 2020! Do not let anyone tell you that you can´t do something. Go ahead. You are stronger than you think! ~ Pia Vakkilainen [@piav_tri] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Pia! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
We've got a really special guest for you all for Ep. # 27 of the H.o.T Podcast 🔥🎙- which is now live! This week's guest is the first Pro and Ironman World Champ to come on the show and we can't think of anyone better for it than "The Man" himself, Mr. Dave Scott, 6x Ironman World Champ (along with three 2nd place finishes & a 5th place at the age of 42!), and the first person to go under 8:30 in Kona. Dave Scott’s personal Triathlon journey paralleled the early history of the Ironman Triathlon. His accomplishments on the Big Island of Hawaii even led to him becoming the very first inductee into the Ironman Triathlon Hall of Fame.

It was a real pleasure talking and listening to this legend of the Triathlon world about his journey, his mindset, his relentless & intense approach, his love for exercise, some of his (very accurately-detailed and) insightful and fun stories, and also his coaching, training, and racing philosophies.

If there's something this episode shows us, it's that - the top people in this beautifully-brutal sport (or in any field for that matter), they're not that different from everyone else. But, as Dave himself says, It all comes down to one thing - Mindset! So make sure to tune in because it's not an episode to miss!
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🎧 Episode link in our bio 🎧 -
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Thank you, @davescott6x! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #humansoftriathlon #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
We've got a really special guest for you all for Ep. # 27 of the H.o.T Podcast 🔥🎙- which is now live! This week's guest is the first Pro and Ironman World Champ to come on the show and we can't think of anyone better for it than "The Man" himself, Mr. Dave Scott, 6x Ironman World Champ (along with three 2nd place finishes & a 5th place at the age of 42!), and the first person to go under 8:30 in Kona. Dave Scott’s personal Triathlon journey paralleled the early history of the Ironman Triathlon. His accomplishments on the Big Island of Hawaii even led to him becoming the very first inductee into the Ironman Triathlon Hall of Fame. It was a real pleasure talking and listening to this legend of the Triathlon world about his journey, his mindset, his relentless & intense approach, his love for exercise, some of his (very accurately-detailed and) insightful and fun stories, and also his coaching, training, and racing philosophies. If there's something this episode shows us, it's that - the top people in this beautifully-brutal sport (or in any field for that matter), they're not that different from everyone else. But, as Dave himself says, It all comes down to one thing - Mindset! So make sure to tune in because it's not an episode to miss! . 🎧 Episode link in our bio 🎧 - . Thank you, @davescott6x! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #humansoftriathlon  #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion 
I used to be a runner and because of over-training, I injured myself with a hip labral tear. I discovered cycling, which of course was easier on my body. I decided to add swimming for the health benefits, and with a little encouragement from my friends I started doing Triathlons, and the rest is history! I love being part of the Triathlon community, everyone has always been so helpful and supportive. The main reason why I TRI is to show my three children by example that hard work and determination always pays off. ~ Laura Torres [@lauratorres_37]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Laura! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
I used to be a runner and because of over-training, I injured myself with a hip labral tear. I discovered cycling, which of course was easier on my body. I decided to add swimming for the health benefits, and with a little encouragement from my friends I started doing Triathlons, and the rest is history! I love being part of the Triathlon community, everyone has always been so helpful and supportive. The main reason why I TRI is to show my three children by example that hard work and determination always pays off. ~ Laura Torres [@lauratorres_37] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Laura! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
I started Triathlon after my career in the military was cut short due to a broken neck. I had always been athletic and even turned a 4:34 mile during my early days. I had always been able to “swim” but getting in the pool and doing it the “right way” was eye-opening.

I have always been very fortunate, in that, I am hard headed and don’t know how to quit, so I typically "embrace the suck” pretty well. My first Triathlon was an Olympic-distance in 2012, and I was hooked. Six months later, I finished my first 70.3 in a Knoxville monsoon where nearly half the participants fell out. Three months after that, I completed my first full Ironman (Louisville) – 6 weeks after a pretty bad bike crash, in 13:23:31 (you never seem to forget the time). A week later, I completed my first Sprint just to say I hit every distance. Since then, I have completed numerous races of various distances.

Triathlon keeps me in check and keeps me healthy. As long as I sign up for a race - I train. If I don’t, then I start getting lazy. So, the way I see it - the sport of Triathlon is not only a hobby but a way of life and way better than any diet. ~ Casey Fiscus [@scrappyfisci]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Casey! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
I started Triathlon after my career in the military was cut short due to a broken neck. I had always been athletic and even turned a 4:34 mile during my early days. I had always been able to “swim” but getting in the pool and doing it the “right way” was eye-opening. I have always been very fortunate, in that, I am hard headed and don’t know how to quit, so I typically "embrace the suck” pretty well. My first Triathlon was an Olympic-distance in 2012, and I was hooked. Six months later, I finished my first 70.3 in a Knoxville monsoon where nearly half the participants fell out. Three months after that, I completed my first full Ironman (Louisville) – 6 weeks after a pretty bad bike crash, in 13:23:31 (you never seem to forget the time). A week later, I completed my first Sprint just to say I hit every distance. Since then, I have completed numerous races of various distances. Triathlon keeps me in check and keeps me healthy. As long as I sign up for a race - I train. If I don’t, then I start getting lazy. So, the way I see it - the sport of Triathlon is not only a hobby but a way of life and way better than any diet. ~ Casey Fiscus [@scrappyfisci] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Casey! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
I'm Pernille, 27 y.o, & I am pretty new to Triathlon, 2018 is actually my first season. And what a year I've had - better than I could ever have dreamed of!

Before this season, I only focused on running for years, I could bike & swim, just never thought about it as something you could combine. In 2015, I started training for my first marathon & I met a truly inspiring woman who had, only a few months earlier, finished her first Ironman! I was amazed & thoughts about Triathlon started swirling around in my head, but the time was not right for me to take it up, due to studies & travelling, so I kept it as a future plan in my head.

Then last year, 2017, I got a job far away from family & friends, which in the beginning felt really sad & lonely - I saw it as a possibility for Triathlon. I started searching for a local tri-club & found the 'Thy Triathlon Team'. Joining that club was the best decision I've made in a long time! The social community made me feel like home so fast. It made the training way more fun. It made me get training done even on days when the weather sucked & the alarm went off way too early.  It kept the motivation up. It was for everybody despite level & speed; and for a newbie like me I learned so much. And that is what Triathlon is for me: home, happiness, friends, challenge, & joy!

Many think it is an individual sport, but for me, it is definitely not. And the bumps along the way have been there, but I have not noticed them as much, due to the support from my team! With their help, I managed to finish my first 70.3, a thing I only wished could happen, & I also finished the season as Nordic Champion of the Sprint distance in my AG! None of this could have happened if I had not joined the team, which I am so grateful for.

In 2019, I am going to do a bit of work in a small city in Greenland which will limit my possibility of training as much & participating in Triathlon races, but I might take a home-trainer & a bike, so I can maintain some fitness. Just imagine the view I would get from the bike from over the ice sheet & ocean! ~ Pernille Jellestad [@jellestad] #humansoftriathlon
I'm Pernille, 27 y.o, & I am pretty new to Triathlon, 2018 is actually my first season. And what a year I've had - better than I could ever have dreamed of! Before this season, I only focused on running for years, I could bike & swim, just never thought about it as something you could combine. In 2015, I started training for my first marathon & I met a truly inspiring woman who had, only a few months earlier, finished her first Ironman! I was amazed & thoughts about Triathlon started swirling around in my head, but the time was not right for me to take it up, due to studies & travelling, so I kept it as a future plan in my head. Then last year, 2017, I got a job far away from family & friends, which in the beginning felt really sad & lonely - I saw it as a possibility for Triathlon. I started searching for a local tri-club & found the 'Thy Triathlon Team'. Joining that club was the best decision I've made in a long time! The social community made me feel like home so fast. It made the training way more fun. It made me get training done even on days when the weather sucked & the alarm went off way too early. It kept the motivation up. It was for everybody despite level & speed; and for a newbie like me I learned so much. And that is what Triathlon is for me: home, happiness, friends, challenge, & joy! Many think it is an individual sport, but for me, it is definitely not. And the bumps along the way have been there, but I have not noticed them as much, due to the support from my team! With their help, I managed to finish my first 70.3, a thing I only wished could happen, & I also finished the season as Nordic Champion of the Sprint distance in my AG! None of this could have happened if I had not joined the team, which I am so grateful for. In 2019, I am going to do a bit of work in a small city in Greenland which will limit my possibility of training as much & participating in Triathlon races, but I might take a home-trainer & a bike, so I can maintain some fitness. Just imagine the view I would get from the bike from over the ice sheet & ocean! ~ Pernille Jellestad [@jellestad] #humansoftriathlon 
My journey as an athlete has always been closely related to my journey with mental illness (depression/anxiety). I grew up playing team sports, mainly soccer, and it was always my escape. I was able to lose myself while playing and it was one of, if not the only thing, that I was able to find some happiness in. My playing days ended after one year of college. Since that time, I have struggled to find something to take soccer’s place, and struggled to find anything in my life that I could consistently find happiness in. I went through periods of varying levels of fitness since then and have always known that an active and healthy lifestyle was the single biggest contributor to how I felt. After a breakdown at 35, I was honestly scared of what I was going to do. I decided that I needed to make some lifestyle changes, so I began committing myself to my physical health through exercise and becoming vegan. This was my segway into Triathlon. I quickly fell in love with endurance sports. I signed up for a sprint Triathlon and have not looked back since. I recently finished my first two 70.3s as well as 3 half marathons this year. Triathlon has helped me gain a better perspective on who I am, maintain self-discipline, and understand that I am capable of much more than I thought I was.  I am truly grateful to have found this sport. Working daily to better myself has allowed me to see the best in myself. ~ Jacob Roames [@jr_trialete]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Jacob! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
My journey as an athlete has always been closely related to my journey with mental illness (depression/anxiety). I grew up playing team sports, mainly soccer, and it was always my escape. I was able to lose myself while playing and it was one of, if not the only thing, that I was able to find some happiness in. My playing days ended after one year of college. Since that time, I have struggled to find something to take soccer’s place, and struggled to find anything in my life that I could consistently find happiness in. I went through periods of varying levels of fitness since then and have always known that an active and healthy lifestyle was the single biggest contributor to how I felt. After a breakdown at 35, I was honestly scared of what I was going to do. I decided that I needed to make some lifestyle changes, so I began committing myself to my physical health through exercise and becoming vegan. This was my segway into Triathlon. I quickly fell in love with endurance sports. I signed up for a sprint Triathlon and have not looked back since. I recently finished my first two 70.3s as well as 3 half marathons this year. Triathlon has helped me gain a better perspective on who I am, maintain self-discipline, and understand that I am capable of much more than I thought I was. I am truly grateful to have found this sport. Working daily to better myself has allowed me to see the best in myself. ~ Jacob Roames [@jr_trialete] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Jacob! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
Just one year ago, walking to the mailbox was something I literally hated! It felt too far!

Then, with the help of the social-media algorithm Gods (they exist, right?!) I was put in front of a trainer based in Chicago (I'm in Connecticut). Eric Bassett of EB30X was training people who actually looked like me - plus size clients are rarely featured anywhere on social media but that's exactly what I saw on his pages, so I followed along! After commenting several times, he saw my interest and called me out of the blue, we had a session together through FaceTime! Brilliant!

I trained with him twice a week, and in one year I had lost 100 lbs (45 kg)! Around the eight-month mark, I knew that I wanted to celebrate my accomplishment doing something waaaaay out of my comfort zone! I had been showing up for myself and trying hard to be more fit - so next up, I chose to Tri and signed myself up!

My partner, family, and friends literally surrounded me that day and held me up - and Eric FLEW IN FROM CHICAGO to support me. IT WAS EPIC!! Besides the birth of my three children, it was the best day of my life!

If anyone is doubting themselves, I do hope they will take a spin through my story. I'm proof that if you show up for yourself - great things happen! ~ Lisa Jo Hurbaugh [@ljlosinglbs]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Lisa! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
Just one year ago, walking to the mailbox was something I literally hated! It felt too far! Then, with the help of the social-media algorithm Gods (they exist, right?!) I was put in front of a trainer based in Chicago (I'm in Connecticut). Eric Bassett of EB30X was training people who actually looked like me - plus size clients are rarely featured anywhere on social media but that's exactly what I saw on his pages, so I followed along! After commenting several times, he saw my interest and called me out of the blue, we had a session together through FaceTime! Brilliant! I trained with him twice a week, and in one year I had lost 100 lbs (45 kg)! Around the eight-month mark, I knew that I wanted to celebrate my accomplishment doing something waaaaay out of my comfort zone! I had been showing up for myself and trying hard to be more fit - so next up, I chose to Tri and signed myself up! My partner, family, and friends literally surrounded me that day and held me up - and Eric FLEW IN FROM CHICAGO to support me. IT WAS EPIC!! Besides the birth of my three children, it was the best day of my life! If anyone is doubting themselves, I do hope they will take a spin through my story. I'm proof that if you show up for yourself - great things happen! ~ Lisa Jo Hurbaugh [@ljlosinglbs] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Lisa! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
I began Triathlon two and half years ago after a back injury meant swimming was all I could manage at the time. I had run a marathon earlier in the year which was the first time I had taken any sport, especially my running, seriously, and I liked the challenge. Two friends were doing Triathlon at the time, so I bought a rode bike as I hadn't ridden a bike since school and after being pain free for a few days, decided that I would do a sprint Triathlon. I figured that if I enjoyed it, I could do Triathlon in the summer to give my running legs a break until I could do another marathon. I was immediately addicted.

Since then, I have done loads of short course races, a handful of halves, winning my age group in my second 70.3, qualifying for 70.3 Worlds in 2017 and more recently, completing my first Ironman in Cairns, finishing 5th in 9:19 qualifying for Ironman World Champs in Kona. I have been very fortunate in the sport and enjoy the hard work and training that goes into it. The sport is great in that it's challenging mentally, physically and emotionally. Few other things out there will challenge you the way endurance sport does, it gives you great perspective on things and teaches you strategies to find a way through tough times. I have learned a lot from Triathlon and the great people in it. It rewards discipline, consistency and is unbiased. It is an honest sport, work hard and it rewards you. I have had my fair share of injuries to overcome and have learnt to be patient and the importance of looking after your mind and body.

I Tri because it challenges me in every way making each time you achieve your goals more and more satisfying. There is inspiration and support everywhere in the sport and it can take you all over the world. There is an intense satisfaction to setting goals, having the discipline and making the effort to achieve them. It teaches you a lot about yourself and has given me the confidence that I can do anything I set my mind to. I have met amazing people along the way and am very thankful to be a part of it. ~ Kieran Birch [@k_birchy]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Kieran! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #humansoftriathlon
I began Triathlon two and half years ago after a back injury meant swimming was all I could manage at the time. I had run a marathon earlier in the year which was the first time I had taken any sport, especially my running, seriously, and I liked the challenge. Two friends were doing Triathlon at the time, so I bought a rode bike as I hadn't ridden a bike since school and after being pain free for a few days, decided that I would do a sprint Triathlon. I figured that if I enjoyed it, I could do Triathlon in the summer to give my running legs a break until I could do another marathon. I was immediately addicted. Since then, I have done loads of short course races, a handful of halves, winning my age group in my second 70.3, qualifying for 70.3 Worlds in 2017 and more recently, completing my first Ironman in Cairns, finishing 5th in 9:19 qualifying for Ironman World Champs in Kona. I have been very fortunate in the sport and enjoy the hard work and training that goes into it. The sport is great in that it's challenging mentally, physically and emotionally. Few other things out there will challenge you the way endurance sport does, it gives you great perspective on things and teaches you strategies to find a way through tough times. I have learned a lot from Triathlon and the great people in it. It rewards discipline, consistency and is unbiased. It is an honest sport, work hard and it rewards you. I have had my fair share of injuries to overcome and have learnt to be patient and the importance of looking after your mind and body. I Tri because it challenges me in every way making each time you achieve your goals more and more satisfying. There is inspiration and support everywhere in the sport and it can take you all over the world. There is an intense satisfaction to setting goals, having the discipline and making the effort to achieve them. It teaches you a lot about yourself and has given me the confidence that I can do anything I set my mind to. I have met amazing people along the way and am very thankful to be a part of it. ~ Kieran Birch [@k_birchy] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Kieran! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #humansoftriathlon 
I'd never been very athletic, I was divorced before 30, & started really thinking about who I was as I started to deal with a crippling depression. To give myself a goal, I entered IMTX, trained hard, but 4 months before, reality caught up with me. I took a long time to fully understand, but I was living a lie. I'm a transgender woman, & I'd fought against & hidden the reality, but I knew I couldn't go any further without being honest.

Coming out changed my whole life. Sadly, it also stymied my plans to race that year as my fitness disappeared. I tried coming back but faced my depression even more, was drinking every night, & comfort eating everything I could. I was me, but I was dealing with negativity & judgement.

The one thing that's stayed an amazing constant for me is my relationship with my daughter, she's always been loving, accepting, & the person I most enjoy spending time with. I get far less time with her than I'd like, but I treasure every minute. She's a big reason I Tri, I wanted to feel like I was inspiring her, & I figured I could do that by living a stronger & better life for myself. I signed up for my 1st 70.3 & finished it 4 months later. I'd caught the bug.

Then, of course, because life likes to throw curve-balls, I ended up having surgery, losing my mother, being laid off, & going through bankruptcy in the next few months.

Mid-2017, I finally managed to raise myself above the depressive funk & decided to begin again, but slowly. Being me, I signed up for a 50k trail run happening in 2 months. I didn't finish, but I finished one a month later. In the next 6 months, I completed 3 more 50ks, Austin 70.3, DNFed a 50-miler, finished my 1st 50-miler, & finally finished a 100k, dead last, exhausted, but so happy!

Why I Tri? I feel like I've turned everything around by setting big goals every time my life has gone wrong, & Triathlon has been a huge part of that. I want to get into shape, I want to inspire my daughter, & we've already completed 2 trail runs together! ~ Katy P [@infinikaty]
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Ep. # 26 of the H.o.T Podcast 🔥🎙'The Trials & Tribulations of a Transgender Woman in Trails & Triathlon' is live! 🎧 Link in bio 🎧 #humansoftriathlon
I'd never been very athletic, I was divorced before 30, & started really thinking about who I was as I started to deal with a crippling depression. To give myself a goal, I entered IMTX, trained hard, but 4 months before, reality caught up with me. I took a long time to fully understand, but I was living a lie. I'm a transgender woman, & I'd fought against & hidden the reality, but I knew I couldn't go any further without being honest. Coming out changed my whole life. Sadly, it also stymied my plans to race that year as my fitness disappeared. I tried coming back but faced my depression even more, was drinking every night, & comfort eating everything I could. I was me, but I was dealing with negativity & judgement. The one thing that's stayed an amazing constant for me is my relationship with my daughter, she's always been loving, accepting, & the person I most enjoy spending time with. I get far less time with her than I'd like, but I treasure every minute. She's a big reason I Tri, I wanted to feel like I was inspiring her, & I figured I could do that by living a stronger & better life for myself. I signed up for my 1st 70.3 & finished it 4 months later. I'd caught the bug. Then, of course, because life likes to throw curve-balls, I ended up having surgery, losing my mother, being laid off, & going through bankruptcy in the next few months. Mid-2017, I finally managed to raise myself above the depressive funk & decided to begin again, but slowly. Being me, I signed up for a 50k trail run happening in 2 months. I didn't finish, but I finished one a month later. In the next 6 months, I completed 3 more 50ks, Austin 70.3, DNFed a 50-miler, finished my 1st 50-miler, & finally finished a 100k, dead last, exhausted, but so happy! Why I Tri? I feel like I've turned everything around by setting big goals every time my life has gone wrong, & Triathlon has been a huge part of that. I want to get into shape, I want to inspire my daughter, & we've already completed 2 trail runs together! ~ Katy P [@infinikaty] . Ep. # 26 of the H.o.T Podcast 🔥🎙'The Trials & Tribulations of a Transgender Woman in Trails & Triathlon' is live! 🎧 Link in bio 🎧 #humansoftriathlon 
Inspiring TEDx Talk by @elsvisser3 on how a shipwreck in 2014 changed her life and she went from being a doctor to a professional-triathlete. 💪 -
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"Competing in an Ironman Triathlon is one thing, surviving a shipwreck is a whole other story."
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Link to the full video is in her bio.
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#tedxmaastricht #tedtalks #tedx #shipwreck #survivor #indonesia #doctor #surgery #triathlete #triathlon #ironmantri
​I've always liked sports & did many of them since I was a kid (gymnastics, basketball, judo, aikido, & running) but it's only been a year since I started Triathlon. My very first Triathlon was a middle-distance event a little over a year ago. A running friend had challenged me saying that it would be great to try something new. Earlier, I never really swam, only commuted on cycle sometimes, & ran for 5 years & could be seen as "an addict". I did the Triathlon & even though I felt anxious & scared looking at the water at the start, I completed it feeling so thrilled! I felt like I had just opened a door to new & exciting horizons. ​I ​joined the Triathlon club of my town & started swim training & going cycling several times a week, besides running. I made great progress & enjoyed every race & training more & more. I also met the person closest to what we can call a soulmate, @joachim_kbwc. Although he's not THE reason that keeps me going, he's an important part of my life & my marvelous Triathlon adventure. Since May, I've done races of various distances & I can't wait to do more soon! ​Triathlon has made me realize that I can always improve & be a better version of myself day-after-day. I discovered other disciplines & learned to be humble starting them from scratch, next to other triathletes that have been tri-ing for 10 years or more! For me, it's a great way to build mental strength & self-confidence. Triathlon also made me even more close to & aware of nature's beauty. And finally, it reminds me how the simple things are the most important in life. ~ Christelle P [@ishotmylife]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Christelle! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
​I've always liked sports & did many of them since I was a kid (gymnastics, basketball, judo, aikido, & running) but it's only been a year since I started Triathlon. My very first Triathlon was a middle-distance event a little over a year ago. A running friend had challenged me saying that it would be great to try something new. Earlier, I never really swam, only commuted on cycle sometimes, & ran for 5 years & could be seen as "an addict". I did the Triathlon & even though I felt anxious & scared looking at the water at the start, I completed it feeling so thrilled! I felt like I had just opened a door to new & exciting horizons. ​I ​joined the Triathlon club of my town & started swim training & going cycling several times a week, besides running. I made great progress & enjoyed every race & training more & more. I also met the person closest to what we can call a soulmate, @joachim_kbwc. Although he's not THE reason that keeps me going, he's an important part of my life & my marvelous Triathlon adventure. Since May, I've done races of various distances & I can't wait to do more soon! ​Triathlon has made me realize that I can always improve & be a better version of myself day-after-day. I discovered other disciplines & learned to be humble starting them from scratch, next to other triathletes that have been tri-ing for 10 years or more! For me, it's a great way to build mental strength & self-confidence. Triathlon also made me even more close to & aware of nature's beauty. And finally, it reminds me how the simple things are the most important in life. ~ Christelle P [@ishotmylife] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Christelle! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
I began running 10 years ago in an attempt to try to improve my health. I ran small races and small distances and was happy with it. I thought running more than 10K was a crazy thing to do. About 4 years ago, I moved to the US and my weight increased exponentially. I decided to take drastic measures and registered for my first ever marathon! As soon as I received the entry acceptance email I new I had to be committed to this. I trained hard, completely scared of the distance. In the process, I lost some toenails, injured my feet, stopped drinking, and forgot what a late night out was. My weight nearly went back to normal and I managed to finish the race 30mins faster than my predicted time! This, the birth of my first daughter, and the World Triathlon Championship happening in my city, motivated me to sign up for my first Triathlon. I trained hard, not knowing what this sport was about. I didn't even know how to swim properly. I went to the lake for a swim clinic and almost drowned in the first 10 mts. I really thought this wasn't my sport, but I'm really stubborn about the things I commit to. One month before the race, I had an accident and cut my right hand’s extensor tendon. I had to cancel my race. I recovered from that injury and moved back to my home country. I still wanted to race a Triathlon but didn’t know how and where to train. I tried out different teams, but finally met @aethosport. This team has supported me, taught me how to swim, took me to my first olympic-distance (that I couldn't finish the swimming part of), but has taken me to finish my first ever 70.3! The most amazing part of it was seeing my wife and my daughter waiting for me at the finish line. I race for them so that I can show them that anything is possible, if you commit to it, and have your discipline. Now, a second daughter is on the way, and just in time for my second 70.3 distance in less than a month. ~ Daniel López [@dflopezsierra]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Daniel! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
I began running 10 years ago in an attempt to try to improve my health. I ran small races and small distances and was happy with it. I thought running more than 10K was a crazy thing to do. About 4 years ago, I moved to the US and my weight increased exponentially. I decided to take drastic measures and registered for my first ever marathon! As soon as I received the entry acceptance email I new I had to be committed to this. I trained hard, completely scared of the distance. In the process, I lost some toenails, injured my feet, stopped drinking, and forgot what a late night out was. My weight nearly went back to normal and I managed to finish the race 30mins faster than my predicted time! This, the birth of my first daughter, and the World Triathlon Championship happening in my city, motivated me to sign up for my first Triathlon. I trained hard, not knowing what this sport was about. I didn't even know how to swim properly. I went to the lake for a swim clinic and almost drowned in the first 10 mts. I really thought this wasn't my sport, but I'm really stubborn about the things I commit to. One month before the race, I had an accident and cut my right hand’s extensor tendon. I had to cancel my race. I recovered from that injury and moved back to my home country. I still wanted to race a Triathlon but didn’t know how and where to train. I tried out different teams, but finally met @aethosport. This team has supported me, taught me how to swim, took me to my first olympic-distance (that I couldn't finish the swimming part of), but has taken me to finish my first ever 70.3! The most amazing part of it was seeing my wife and my daughter waiting for me at the finish line. I race for them so that I can show them that anything is possible, if you commit to it, and have your discipline. Now, a second daughter is on the way, and just in time for my second 70.3 distance in less than a month. ~ Daniel López [@dflopezsierra] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Daniel! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
I used to be intimidated by Triathlon. I was first introduced to the sport after meeting my husband who was competitive in Ironman. I had just started getting into running & thought there was no way I would train for three sports. After spending several years focused on running goals, I came to a point where I was getting mentally burned out from the 80 mile training weeks. Last year, I wasn't sure what to do next with running, I knew I needed a new goal but my excitement was slowly dwindling. So I decided to break out of my comfort zone & chose to train & complete a 50k, my first & last ultra distance event. Three weeks later, after using swimming as a mode to recover from the long running event, I participated in a sprint Tri. I was on a cyclocross bike, using a borrowed wetsuit & can remember loving every minute of it despite the nerves I felt at the start of the race. A week later, I did an Olympic race on a road bike & decided I wanted Triathlon to be my new focus for 2018.

This year, I completed my first 70.3 & have done 5 local Triathlons with my own wetsuit & clip on arrow bars for my road bike. My interest in the sport has re-ignited the fire for my husband & we now train together. I have slowly started to invest in proper equipment & with training have been able to achieve some decent finish times in all of the events I have participated in.

The Triathlon community is competitive but friendly & I love being a part of such a supportive group of athletes. I find joy in all 3 sports & although running was my first passion, I am learning to enjoy the bike as much as I do the run. I am no longer intimidated by Triathlon & encourage anyone who is contemplating their first race, regardless of the distance, to put themselves out there, take a risk & see what happens. After all, in the words of Ironman “Anything is Possible”. ~ Megan Newton [@all_you_need_is_two_feet]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Megan! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
I used to be intimidated by Triathlon. I was first introduced to the sport after meeting my husband who was competitive in Ironman. I had just started getting into running & thought there was no way I would train for three sports. After spending several years focused on running goals, I came to a point where I was getting mentally burned out from the 80 mile training weeks. Last year, I wasn't sure what to do next with running, I knew I needed a new goal but my excitement was slowly dwindling. So I decided to break out of my comfort zone & chose to train & complete a 50k, my first & last ultra distance event. Three weeks later, after using swimming as a mode to recover from the long running event, I participated in a sprint Tri. I was on a cyclocross bike, using a borrowed wetsuit & can remember loving every minute of it despite the nerves I felt at the start of the race. A week later, I did an Olympic race on a road bike & decided I wanted Triathlon to be my new focus for 2018. This year, I completed my first 70.3 & have done 5 local Triathlons with my own wetsuit & clip on arrow bars for my road bike. My interest in the sport has re-ignited the fire for my husband & we now train together. I have slowly started to invest in proper equipment & with training have been able to achieve some decent finish times in all of the events I have participated in. The Triathlon community is competitive but friendly & I love being a part of such a supportive group of athletes. I find joy in all 3 sports & although running was my first passion, I am learning to enjoy the bike as much as I do the run. I am no longer intimidated by Triathlon & encourage anyone who is contemplating their first race, regardless of the distance, to put themselves out there, take a risk & see what happens. After all, in the words of Ironman “Anything is Possible”. ~ Megan Newton [@all_you_need_is_two_feet] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Megan! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
When I returned from operational service in Iraq with the British Military, in 2007, I needed a new challenge. I'd already completed my first Marathon, the 'Boston Marathon in Iraq’, whilst deployed. I had a swimming background & rode a little, so I decided to head for my first Triathlon. Loved it! I felt like I'd found something to replace Rugby in my life. I was then deployed to Afghanistan so Tri took a back seat for a while until I emigrated to Australia in late 2009. I continued with sporadic olympic-distances without any specific training & performed well.

I then took another break from Tri in order to support my wife who suffered from PTSD & shifted my focus to Criterium racing. I loved the community & the Lifecycle Cycling Club who welcomed me with open arms. But I kept up the running in the background, just in case!

I moved to France in 2016 on posting with the Australian Army & it was the perfect opportunity to get back to Tri. Did Aix 70.3 & then Lanzarotte 2017 where I qualified for SA 2018 along with my brother, Ewan Shepherd. But 2017 was the hardest year of my life. My grandmother & father passed away & the late nights on the turbo trainer moved me to a very dark place. After years of supporting my sick wife & the grief - it all became too much. In Oct, that year, my wife decided our marriage was over & essentially pushed me off the cliff. I had a nervous breakdown & lost my ability to function as a human. I used training to help me through the journey of recovery. It was not easy, often finding myself in pieces on the side of the road or draped over the indoor trainer with tears in my eyes. I have fought through, completing a solo 24hr MTB without shedding a tear, that’s progress. Triathlon is individual, you have no one to blame for failure but yourself, you know when you have done your best, but on the other side, your success is your own.

I have learnt more about myself from Triathlon in the last year than I have in my whole life. When I am 3hrs into a session my mind finally clears itself of the baggage in my life. It gives me clarity in difficult times & I am grateful for this gift. ~ Paul Watson [@watsonvelo] #humansoftriathlon
When I returned from operational service in Iraq with the British Military, in 2007, I needed a new challenge. I'd already completed my first Marathon, the 'Boston Marathon in Iraq’, whilst deployed. I had a swimming background & rode a little, so I decided to head for my first Triathlon. Loved it! I felt like I'd found something to replace Rugby in my life. I was then deployed to Afghanistan so Tri took a back seat for a while until I emigrated to Australia in late 2009. I continued with sporadic olympic-distances without any specific training & performed well. I then took another break from Tri in order to support my wife who suffered from PTSD & shifted my focus to Criterium racing. I loved the community & the Lifecycle Cycling Club who welcomed me with open arms. But I kept up the running in the background, just in case! I moved to France in 2016 on posting with the Australian Army & it was the perfect opportunity to get back to Tri. Did Aix 70.3 & then Lanzarotte 2017 where I qualified for SA 2018 along with my brother, Ewan Shepherd. But 2017 was the hardest year of my life. My grandmother & father passed away & the late nights on the turbo trainer moved me to a very dark place. After years of supporting my sick wife & the grief - it all became too much. In Oct, that year, my wife decided our marriage was over & essentially pushed me off the cliff. I had a nervous breakdown & lost my ability to function as a human. I used training to help me through the journey of recovery. It was not easy, often finding myself in pieces on the side of the road or draped over the indoor trainer with tears in my eyes. I have fought through, completing a solo 24hr MTB without shedding a tear, that’s progress. Triathlon is individual, you have no one to blame for failure but yourself, you know when you have done your best, but on the other side, your success is your own. I have learnt more about myself from Triathlon in the last year than I have in my whole life. When I am 3hrs into a session my mind finally clears itself of the baggage in my life. It gives me clarity in difficult times & I am grateful for this gift. ~ Paul Watson [@watsonvelo] #humansoftriathlon 
Doing Triathlons has been on my bucket list for ages. But I never started - afraid of failure, afraid I would be a really bad triathlete, they all looked super fit & intimidating, no way I could do that. I’ve been a runner for several years & am also an asthma athlete which has always made me very insecure about my running. Being a slower athlete, I couldn’t help but compare myself to others & I felt not worthy calling myself a runner or an athlete, even though I ran a few HMs. I felt small, afraid to take up my space. Luckily, I started to learn to value my own progress.

Last year, I decided to get this tri-adventure started. There was no turning back. This summer, I did 2 sprints. At both races I got out of the water dead last. At first, it felt like failing & I felt like a loser...again. But I wasn’t a loser. I got out there & did it.

As a genuine introvert, for me, it can be hard to make contact with people or even deal with them, but I noticed with tri-training & racing connecting to other people suddenly comes natural to me. Who would have thought?! Next year, In August, I will do the 70.3 in Vichy (France) for charity, raising money for children’s cancer. I have a lot of training to do & lot of progress to make. It won’t be easy, but it will definitely be worth it. I need it to be this big of a goal to finally get rid of my self doubt & truly believe in my capacity.

This season, training helped me cope with my mother’s death. I am still in the middle of the healing process. Sometimes, I glide into a dark place, but my training keeps me sane.

I am looking forward to the new season. Of course I will doubt myself from time to time, but I just have to look back & see how much progress I've made. It’s amazing! I don’t apologize anymore for not being the fastest one, I am taking up my space un-apologetically. Even though I’m turning 40 soon, my Triathlon adventure has just begun. It will make me stronger, in body & spirit. It already taught me to overcome the hurdles in life. It showed me people do care & will help you if you ask. I will never be the fastest, no podiums for me, but I will reach that finish line. ~ Natalia Z [@nataliazen] #humansoftriathlon
Doing Triathlons has been on my bucket list for ages. But I never started - afraid of failure, afraid I would be a really bad triathlete, they all looked super fit & intimidating, no way I could do that. I’ve been a runner for several years & am also an asthma athlete which has always made me very insecure about my running. Being a slower athlete, I couldn’t help but compare myself to others & I felt not worthy calling myself a runner or an athlete, even though I ran a few HMs. I felt small, afraid to take up my space. Luckily, I started to learn to value my own progress. Last year, I decided to get this tri-adventure started. There was no turning back. This summer, I did 2 sprints. At both races I got out of the water dead last. At first, it felt like failing & I felt like a loser...again. But I wasn’t a loser. I got out there & did it. As a genuine introvert, for me, it can be hard to make contact with people or even deal with them, but I noticed with tri-training & racing connecting to other people suddenly comes natural to me. Who would have thought?! Next year, In August, I will do the 70.3 in Vichy (France) for charity, raising money for children’s cancer. I have a lot of training to do & lot of progress to make. It won’t be easy, but it will definitely be worth it. I need it to be this big of a goal to finally get rid of my self doubt & truly believe in my capacity. This season, training helped me cope with my mother’s death. I am still in the middle of the healing process. Sometimes, I glide into a dark place, but my training keeps me sane. I am looking forward to the new season. Of course I will doubt myself from time to time, but I just have to look back & see how much progress I've made. It’s amazing! I don’t apologize anymore for not being the fastest one, I am taking up my space un-apologetically. Even though I’m turning 40 soon, my Triathlon adventure has just begun. It will make me stronger, in body & spirit. It already taught me to overcome the hurdles in life. It showed me people do care & will help you if you ask. I will never be the fastest, no podiums for me, but I will reach that finish line. ~ Natalia Z [@nataliazen] #humansoftriathlon 
My journey started when I took up running to lose weight as I was about 95kg (210lb). I then completed a couple mini-sprint Triathlons but struggled with the swim & decided to stick to running. I happened to see a show on ESPN about IRONMAN, which got me interested to take up Triathlon more seriously to challenge myself. I read up on it, put up a plan for myself & went about training for my first IM. The funny part was that I thought that if I train & complete an IM, it would make me a good swimmer. I was so wrong. I made the swim cut off with only 2 mins to spare & completed my first IM in 2008 in just under 16hrs.

I then set myself a long-term goal to improve my finish time & it has kept me focused over the years. I have now completed 20 IMs, including the WC in Kona, with a best time of 10:19. The sport has taught me that it's important to build a good foundation, stay consistent & take care of the small but equally important things like rest, recovery, & nutrition to improve performance & stay injury free. It also takes a lot of support & I have a really supportive wife who has helped me throughout. Triathlon, for me, is a lifestyle that has allowed me to chase my dreams. In 2013, I moved out of my 14yr corporate job & changed careers to a full-time Tri coach supporting the community & working on developing the sport in India. It gives me great joy & satisfaction to see my trainees attain their goals. Triathlon has helped me connect, interact & work with so many like-minded individuals over the years & the journey continues. ~ Deepak Raj [@coachdeepakraj]
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Ep. # 25 of the H.o.T Podcast 🔥🎙is now available featuring Deepak, our first Indian guest. A good insight into the Triathlon scene in a country where the sport is just getting started & the journey of someone who's one of the top coach & athlete in the country (of 1.3 billion people!) with an array of achievements - 1 of only 3 Indians to race the IMWC at Kona, highest ranked Indian IM for the last 5yrs, coached 500+ athletes from couch-potatoes to Ultraman finishers, just to name a few!
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🎧 Episode link in bio 🎧 -
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Thank you for sharing your story, Deepak! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #humansoftriathlon
My journey started when I took up running to lose weight as I was about 95kg (210lb). I then completed a couple mini-sprint Triathlons but struggled with the swim & decided to stick to running. I happened to see a show on ESPN about IRONMAN, which got me interested to take up Triathlon more seriously to challenge myself. I read up on it, put up a plan for myself & went about training for my first IM. The funny part was that I thought that if I train & complete an IM, it would make me a good swimmer. I was so wrong. I made the swim cut off with only 2 mins to spare & completed my first IM in 2008 in just under 16hrs. I then set myself a long-term goal to improve my finish time & it has kept me focused over the years. I have now completed 20 IMs, including the WC in Kona, with a best time of 10:19. The sport has taught me that it's important to build a good foundation, stay consistent & take care of the small but equally important things like rest, recovery, & nutrition to improve performance & stay injury free. It also takes a lot of support & I have a really supportive wife who has helped me throughout. Triathlon, for me, is a lifestyle that has allowed me to chase my dreams. In 2013, I moved out of my 14yr corporate job & changed careers to a full-time Tri coach supporting the community & working on developing the sport in India. It gives me great joy & satisfaction to see my trainees attain their goals. Triathlon has helped me connect, interact & work with so many like-minded individuals over the years & the journey continues. ~ Deepak Raj [@coachdeepakraj] . Ep. # 25 of the H.o.T Podcast 🔥🎙is now available featuring Deepak, our first Indian guest. A good insight into the Triathlon scene in a country where the sport is just getting started & the journey of someone who's one of the top coach & athlete in the country (of 1.3 billion people!) with an array of achievements - 1 of only 3 Indians to race the IMWC at Kona, highest ranked Indian IM for the last 5yrs, coached 500+ athletes from couch-potatoes to Ultraman finishers, just to name a few! . 🎧 Episode link in bio 🎧 - . Thank you for sharing your story, Deepak! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #humansoftriathlon 
July 2016, having signed up the day before, I rocked my first sprint Triathlon on a hefty hollander-bike & in a borrowed tri-suit. I absolutely loved it! August 2016, I borrowed a friends road bike for my second sprint Tri, all alone to see if I really liked it. I did.

September 2016 saw me on a slightly irresponsible adventure to purchase my own, now beloved, bike. December 2016 saw me travel to Bahrain for my first ever 70.3 (and third ever Triathlon!). I was well and truly hooked.

Unfortunately, back in January 2016, I had badly injured my ankle, and despite a year of physio, the recovery had stalled. June 2017 saw both - a 70.3 finish line and a decision that ultimately, a major surgery was required to re-build my ankle. It was a bad sprain in a long string of bad sprains, and I had struggled with chronic knee and ankle pain for years.

Was I excited about spending months on end in a cast? No, but while you cannot control what challenges life throws at you, you CAN choose how you look at them. This was a chance to rebuild from the foundation up, strong, positive and in control. I worked hard to stay positive through the months in a cast, and look at what I could learn from the patience, gratitude and strength required to heal.

I find the discipline and mental strength needed for Triathlon to be almost addicting, and I Tri to continue to search for my mental and physical boundaries. I love the community, helping friends to achieve their goals while working on my own.

I am a year post-ankle reconstruction, and of those months 4 were in a cast. Since that I have done multiple race and now in-training for my first ever Ironman next year! If anyone is struggling with an injury or a challenging period, take whatever lessons you can from it and just keep moving forward. ~ 
Jenna Denyes [@jddoestri]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Jenna! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
July 2016, having signed up the day before, I rocked my first sprint Triathlon on a hefty hollander-bike & in a borrowed tri-suit. I absolutely loved it! August 2016, I borrowed a friends road bike for my second sprint Tri, all alone to see if I really liked it. I did. September 2016 saw me on a slightly irresponsible adventure to purchase my own, now beloved, bike. December 2016 saw me travel to Bahrain for my first ever 70.3 (and third ever Triathlon!). I was well and truly hooked. Unfortunately, back in January 2016, I had badly injured my ankle, and despite a year of physio, the recovery had stalled. June 2017 saw both - a 70.3 finish line and a decision that ultimately, a major surgery was required to re-build my ankle. It was a bad sprain in a long string of bad sprains, and I had struggled with chronic knee and ankle pain for years. Was I excited about spending months on end in a cast? No, but while you cannot control what challenges life throws at you, you CAN choose how you look at them. This was a chance to rebuild from the foundation up, strong, positive and in control. I worked hard to stay positive through the months in a cast, and look at what I could learn from the patience, gratitude and strength required to heal. I find the discipline and mental strength needed for Triathlon to be almost addicting, and I Tri to continue to search for my mental and physical boundaries. I love the community, helping friends to achieve their goals while working on my own. I am a year post-ankle reconstruction, and of those months 4 were in a cast. Since that I have done multiple race and now in-training for my first ever Ironman next year! If anyone is struggling with an injury or a challenging period, take whatever lessons you can from it and just keep moving forward. ~ Jenna Denyes [@jddoestri] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Jenna! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊
My name is Rafael Olher and I’m a newbie triathlete. I was a swimmer all my life, and after a long period away from sports - I was introduced to this wonderful sport.

I have been doing Triathlon for two years now. My introduction and start to training was pretty random - some of my friends were doing a run and I just decided to follow them. It was only 6k (4miles), I ran awfully and had body pain for 3 whole days, even walking was difficult!

That was when I realized how much my health was impaired. I am a teacher and doctoral student here in Brazil, the life of a teacher and graduate student here is very hard, somewhere around 10h or 16h ours of work per day, and we still find time to train. This year, I did my first half distance race. Soon, maybe, I'll give the full Ironman a go.

I can say that Triathlon changed my life by easing those feelings of very high level of stress that comes with work. I am thankful to some friends who, even till today, motivate me in the sport. ~ Rafael Olher [@rafaolher]
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Thank you for sharing your story with us, Rafael! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion
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Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon to be featured! 👊
My name is Rafael Olher and I’m a newbie triathlete. I was a swimmer all my life, and after a long period away from sports - I was introduced to this wonderful sport. I have been doing Triathlon for two years now. My introduction and start to training was pretty random - some of my friends were doing a run and I just decided to follow them. It was only 6k (4miles), I ran awfully and had body pain for 3 whole days, even walking was difficult! That was when I realized how much my health was impaired. I am a teacher and doctoral student here in Brazil, the life of a teacher and graduate student here is very hard, somewhere around 10h or 16h ours of work per day, and we still find time to train. This year, I did my first half distance race. Soon, maybe, I'll give the full Ironman a go. I can say that Triathlon changed my life by easing those feelings of very high level of stress that comes with work. I am thankful to some friends who, even till today, motivate me in the sport. ~ Rafael Olher [@rafaolher] . Thank you for sharing your story with us, Rafael! Keep Tri'ing! 🏊🚴🏃 #ordinarypeopleextraordinarypassion  . Follow @humansoftriathlon & use #humansoftriathlon  to be featured! 👊