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    B R I T I S H V I L L A G E S
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A S T H A L L 
C O T S W O L D S
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Lying in the Windrush Valley, the lovely village of Astall is bursting in history, with traces of a Roman settlement found and a treasure of coins from the 15th Century found in building work in the village.
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Famously known as the home of the Mitford Sisters, the village is quaint, quiet and a perfect place for country walks.
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📸 by Shelley Hoffmire
A S T H A L L C O T S W O L D S • Lying in the Windrush Valley, the lovely village of Astall is bursting in history, with traces of a Roman settlement found and a treasure of coins from the 15th Century found in building work in the village. • Famously known as the home of the Mitford Sisters, the village is quaint, quiet and a perfect place for country walks. • 📸 by Shelley Hoffmire
M I L L D A L E
D E R B Y S H I R E
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Milldale is a hamlet at the northern end of Dovedale, in Derbyshire. With only a few dozen cottages or so it attracts walkers like few other places of its size in Britain. Most come to explore the beautiful Dove Valley, with its famous Stepping Stones and strange rock formations.
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Mr and Mrs Bailey, who lived at Dove Mount, served refreshments to ramblers for 48 years. In 1966, about 150 members of the Manchester Ramblers Association held a special ceremony to thank them for their services. Nowadays welcome refreshments can be obtained from a small shop window at Polly’s Cottage, named after a former occupant.
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📸 @alina_dragan_
M I L L D A L E D E R B Y S H I R E • Milldale is a hamlet at the northern end of Dovedale, in Derbyshire. With only a few dozen cottages or so it attracts walkers like few other places of its size in Britain. Most come to explore the beautiful Dove Valley, with its famous Stepping Stones and strange rock formations. • Mr and Mrs Bailey, who lived at Dove Mount, served refreshments to ramblers for 48 years. In 1966, about 150 members of the Manchester Ramblers Association held a special ceremony to thank them for their services. Nowadays welcome refreshments can be obtained from a small shop window at Polly’s Cottage, named after a former occupant. • 📸 @alina_dragan_
B A R R A
O U T E R  H E B R I D E S 
S C O T L A N D
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The southernmost inhabited island in the Western Isles (or Outer Hebrides) is reached by a dramatic and romantic flight in a twenty-seater propeller plane. The landing strip disappears twice a day as the tide comes in on this scenic island only 8 miles long and 4 miles wide.
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Barra was the stronghold of the Clan MacNeil and last resting place of the author Compton Mackenzie, who wrote ‘Whiskey Galore’, a romanticised story based on the facts of the 1941 shipwreck of the SS Politician and the subsequent salvage of 240,000 bottles of whiskey by the islanders of neighbouring Eriskay.
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How much would you like to salvage that kind of booty? •
This picture was snapped for a photography competition, the beaches are so stunning here that even the local cows can’t resist an afternoon at the seaside... 🐄
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📸 by Willie Murdoch
B A R R A O U T E R H E B R I D E S S C O T L A N D • The southernmost inhabited island in the Western Isles (or Outer Hebrides) is reached by a dramatic and romantic flight in a twenty-seater propeller plane. The landing strip disappears twice a day as the tide comes in on this scenic island only 8 miles long and 4 miles wide. • Barra was the stronghold of the Clan MacNeil and last resting place of the author Compton Mackenzie, who wrote ‘Whiskey Galore’, a romanticised story based on the facts of the 1941 shipwreck of the SS Politician and the subsequent salvage of 240,000 bottles of whiskey by the islanders of neighbouring Eriskay. • How much would you like to salvage that kind of booty? • This picture was snapped for a photography competition, the beaches are so stunning here that even the local cows can’t resist an afternoon at the seaside... 🐄 • 📸 by Willie Murdoch
C E R N E  A B B A S 
D O R S E T
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If you spot it whilst wandering through the village of Cerne Abbas then you deserve to drop in for a pint, right?
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The village is notable as the location of the Cerne Abbas Giant, a chalk figure of a giant naked man on a hillside.
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Yet, while the Cerne Abbas Giant is now thought by the majority of modern scholars to have been created in the 17th century, the Royal Oak is more historic still — dating from 1540.
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📸 @hope_and_wander
C E R N E A B B A S D O R S E T • If you spot it whilst wandering through the village of Cerne Abbas then you deserve to drop in for a pint, right? • The village is notable as the location of the Cerne Abbas Giant, a chalk figure of a giant naked man on a hillside. • Yet, while the Cerne Abbas Giant is now thought by the majority of modern scholars to have been created in the 17th century, the Royal Oak is more historic still — dating from 1540. • 📸 @hope_and_wander
K Y L E  O F  D U R N E S S
S U T H E R L A N D
S C O T L A N D 
Who wants to hide away in this tiny, unspoiled coastal inlet and escape from the world? 
Kyle of Durness is only half a mile wide and tidal, with Durness itself a small village not far away, with a population of around 400. 
We want to run away here with some books, no internet, and an open fire... AMAZING 📸 by @poetic_mouse 
#tinyweehooses
K Y L E O F D U R N E S S S U T H E R L A N D S C O T L A N D Who wants to hide away in this tiny, unspoiled coastal inlet and escape from the world? Kyle of Durness is only half a mile wide and tidal, with Durness itself a small village not far away, with a population of around 400. We want to run away here with some books, no internet, and an open fire... AMAZING 📸 by @poetic_mouse #tinyweehooses 
N O T T I N G H A M

Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem - 1189

This pub is built into the foundations of Nottingham castle, and was named since it was last stopping off point for soldiers heading in Crusades.

They describe themselves as an ancient pub built into stone caves with a charming, wonky interior and resident ghosts, plus food.

The cursed galleon is a small wooden model of a ship in one the upstairs lounge. It is claimed that people who have cleaned it have all met a mysterious death. Landlords have refused to allow anyone to dust the ship over the years, allowing inches of thick grime to build up on it. The galleon is now encased in glass.

The pub also houses an antique chair; it is claimed that a woman who sits in the chair will increase her chances of becoming pregnant. So many people have sat on the chair in the hope of it bringing them pregnancy that is now is too weak to withstand the huge demand… It is now on display in the upstairs lounge.
N O T T I N G H A M Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem - 1189 This pub is built into the foundations of Nottingham castle, and was named since it was last stopping off point for soldiers heading in Crusades. They describe themselves as an ancient pub built into stone caves with a charming, wonky interior and resident ghosts, plus food. The cursed galleon is a small wooden model of a ship in one the upstairs lounge. It is claimed that people who have cleaned it have all met a mysterious death. Landlords have refused to allow anyone to dust the ship over the years, allowing inches of thick grime to build up on it. The galleon is now encased in glass. The pub also houses an antique chair; it is claimed that a woman who sits in the chair will increase her chances of becoming pregnant. So many people have sat on the chair in the hope of it bringing them pregnancy that is now is too weak to withstand the huge demand… It is now on display in the upstairs lounge.
L A K E  D I S T R I C T 
C U M B R I A 
A lot of visitors believe the Lake District is natural. But is actually a managed environment and the management is done by the sheep.... yes really. 
The Herdwick sheep are the Lake Districts gardeners, and are ‘wild’, to a certain extent. Bred for hundreds of years to be territorial they can be safely left on unfenced terrain and will not wander off their traditional patch. 
This photo was taken by 📸 Ian Lawson as a way of documenting the life of Herwick sheep farmers in the Lake District. A very important way of life not only for their livelihood, but also to manage the area. The whole system and culture that it produced, with the add on effect of a £600m tourist industry would be in danger otherwise. 
Beatrix Potter holidayed in the Lake District as a child and fell in love with the area. She eventually moved there and bought a property with the proceeds of her books. She became and expert in breeding Herdwick sheep, winning many prizes at country shows with them.
L A K E D I S T R I C T C U M B R I A A lot of visitors believe the Lake District is natural. But is actually a managed environment and the management is done by the sheep.... yes really. The Herdwick sheep are the Lake Districts gardeners, and are ‘wild’, to a certain extent. Bred for hundreds of years to be territorial they can be safely left on unfenced terrain and will not wander off their traditional patch. This photo was taken by 📸 Ian Lawson as a way of documenting the life of Herwick sheep farmers in the Lake District. A very important way of life not only for their livelihood, but also to manage the area. The whole system and culture that it produced, with the add on effect of a £600m tourist industry would be in danger otherwise. Beatrix Potter holidayed in the Lake District as a child and fell in love with the area. She eventually moved there and bought a property with the proceeds of her books. She became and expert in breeding Herdwick sheep, winning many prizes at country shows with them.
G R E A T  T E W

O X F O R D S H I R E 
Set in the Cotswolds, Great Tew is another lovely village to sightsee. Traditional English scenes like the post office and village stores greet  you. It’s become a bit of a hot spot as the trendy Soho Farmhouse is also home here just outside Great Tew.

The Falkland Arms in the village still sells its own clay pipes and snuff (not to be used together). 📸 Blue the Bear
G R E A T T E W O X F O R D S H I R E Set in the Cotswolds, Great Tew is another lovely village to sightsee. Traditional English scenes like the post office and village stores greet you. It’s become a bit of a hot spot as the trendy Soho Farmhouse is also home here just outside Great Tew. The Falkland Arms in the village still sells its own clay pipes and snuff (not to be used together). 📸 Blue the Bear
B R I D P O R T 
D O R S E T 
The oldest continuously trading family business in the UK is R J Balson & Son, a butcher from Bridport, Dorset.  It was founded by John Balson, who set up a market stall selling sausages and bacon in 1535. 
Just six years into the reign of Henry VIII. The same year Anne of Cleeves, Henry's fourth wife, was born in Cleeves, Germany and Thomas Wolsey, archbishop of York, was made a cardinal. This was the year before the first published account of the discovery of North America appeared and 8 years before the cocoa bean was introduced to Spain... Since then, dozens of family members have passed their butchery skills down through 25 generations, making this butchers Britain's oldest family business. 📸 John Grindle
B R I D P O R T D O R S E T The oldest continuously trading family business in the UK is R J Balson & Son, a butcher from Bridport, Dorset.  It was founded by John Balson, who set up a market stall selling sausages and bacon in 1535. Just six years into the reign of Henry VIII. The same year Anne of Cleeves, Henry's fourth wife, was born in Cleeves, Germany and Thomas Wolsey, archbishop of York, was made a cardinal. This was the year before the first published account of the discovery of North America appeared and 8 years before the cocoa bean was introduced to Spain... Since then, dozens of family members have passed their butchery skills down through 25 generations, making this butchers Britain's oldest family business. 📸 John Grindle
C R O V I E  V I L L A G E

A B E R D E E N S H I R E 
S C O T L A N D 
Comprising of a single row of houses, Crovie Village sits on a narrow ledge overlooking the east side of Gamrie Bay and the sea. 
Residents can only access the village by walking, leaving their cars at the south end of the village. 
Originally established in the late 18th Century by families cleared from inland estates to make way for their landlords sheep, they then operated fishing boats owned by the landlord for his benefit and at their own risk. 
One of the best preserved fishing villages in Europe, it can either be a tranquil place to visit, or if the weather is rough, one of the most exciting places.
C R O V I E V I L L A G E A B E R D E E N S H I R E S C O T L A N D Comprising of a single row of houses, Crovie Village sits on a narrow ledge overlooking the east side of Gamrie Bay and the sea. Residents can only access the village by walking, leaving their cars at the south end of the village. Originally established in the late 18th Century by families cleared from inland estates to make way for their landlords sheep, they then operated fishing boats owned by the landlord for his benefit and at their own risk. One of the best preserved fishing villages in Europe, it can either be a tranquil place to visit, or if the weather is rough, one of the most exciting places.
A R L I N G T O N  R O W

B I B U R Y 
C O T S W O L D

This beautiful Cotswolds street has become a tourist mecca with thousands visiting the village to catch a glimpse of the picturesque cottages that rather randomly feature on the front inside page of UK passports. 
Coming as quite a surprise to residents, there are now lots of privacy signs dotted around the village, but people can’t resist Arlington Row, which is owned by the National Trust. 
Built around 1380 from local stone and began life as a monastic wool store, it was converted into weavers cottages in the 17th Century. 📸 Blogomentary
A R L I N G T O N R O W B I B U R Y C O T S W O L D This beautiful Cotswolds street has become a tourist mecca with thousands visiting the village to catch a glimpse of the picturesque cottages that rather randomly feature on the front inside page of UK passports. Coming as quite a surprise to residents, there are now lots of privacy signs dotted around the village, but people can’t resist Arlington Row, which is owned by the National Trust. Built around 1380 from local stone and began life as a monastic wool store, it was converted into weavers cottages in the 17th Century. 📸 Blogomentary
H E L T E R - S K E L T E R  H O U S E 
P O T T E R  H E I G H A M 
N O R F O L K 
Named the Dutch Tutch, one of the most instantly recognisable, and most photographed, buildings in Broadland, which sits in the village of Potter Heigham, Norfolk. It has been on this spot for the last 100 years and it began life as a helter skelter which stood at the entrance to Britannia Pier in Great Yarmouth. 
The bottom section is the house, and the top is used as a shed (behind). It was the first residential building on this stretch of the river, and lies on the north/west bank of the Thurne, downstream from Potter Heigham bridge. 📸 The Dabbler
H E L T E R - S K E L T E R H O U S E P O T T E R H E I G H A M N O R F O L K Named the Dutch Tutch, one of the most instantly recognisable, and most photographed, buildings in Broadland, which sits in the village of Potter Heigham, Norfolk. It has been on this spot for the last 100 years and it began life as a helter skelter which stood at the entrance to Britannia Pier in Great Yarmouth. The bottom section is the house, and the top is used as a shed (behind). It was the first residential building on this stretch of the river, and lies on the north/west bank of the Thurne, downstream from Potter Heigham bridge. 📸 The Dabbler
A S K R I G G 
W E N S L E Y D A L E 
Y O R K S H I R E 
The village of Askrigg is the setting for ‘All Creatures Great and Small’, and once celebrated for its clock makers.

For many years it was small and in the shadow of its neighbour Wensley, but things changes in 1563 when the plague struck and wiped out much of Wensley's inhabitants. This lead to Askrigg taking over the weekly market and the village prospered for hundreds of years until it outgrown by Hawes during the 19th century.

This snap is a typically beautiful shot of Yorkshire in all its glory. 📷 Rod Edwards
A S K R I G G W E N S L E Y D A L E Y O R K S H I R E The village of Askrigg is the setting for ‘All Creatures Great and Small’, and once celebrated for its clock makers. For many years it was small and in the shadow of its neighbour Wensley, but things changes in 1563 when the plague struck and wiped out much of Wensley's inhabitants. This lead to Askrigg taking over the weekly market and the village prospered for hundreds of years until it outgrown by Hawes during the 19th century. This snap is a typically beautiful shot of Yorkshire in all its glory. 📷 Rod Edwards
T U  H W N T  I’R  B O N T 
L L A N R W S T 
W A L E S 
This ‘hairy house’ was built back in 1480, sitting on the West Bank of the flowing River Conwy is the award winning, family run Tu Hwnt i’r Bont (Beyond the Bridge). Situated in the market town of Llanrwst, Wales, this building was once used as the courtroom for the surrounding area, and over the centuries had fallen into disrepair several times and been rebuilt and restored through the generosity of the townsfolk. 
During the last century, Tu Hwnt i’r Bont was acquired by the National Trust who have since leased the building for over 50 years. Now a traditional Welsh Tea Room its a must visit destination for the area. 📸 @mjs_venture
T U H W N T I’R B O N T L L A N R W S T W A L E S This ‘hairy house’ was built back in 1480, sitting on the West Bank of the flowing River Conwy is the award winning, family run Tu Hwnt i’r Bont (Beyond the Bridge). Situated in the market town of Llanrwst, Wales, this building was once used as the courtroom for the surrounding area, and over the centuries had fallen into disrepair several times and been rebuilt and restored through the generosity of the townsfolk. During the last century, Tu Hwnt i’r Bont was acquired by the National Trust who have since leased the building for over 50 years. Now a traditional Welsh Tea Room its a must visit destination for the area. 📸 @mjs_venture
C A D G W I T H 
C O R N W A L L ‘Cove of the thicket’, this village and fishing port in Cornwall used to be densely wooded back in medieval times, and fishing subsidised local farmers livelihoods. 
Sitting on the Lizard Peninsula, a treacherous coastline due to submerged rocks and weather factors, there a numerous wrecks on the rocks nearby, which means this area is popular with deep sea diving. 
A popular holiday destination, the village hosts a regatta, Morris dancing, summer bbqs, and regular singing by the Cadgwith Singers in the Cadgwith Cove Inn, a 400 year old pub. 
The South West Coast Path traverses the village, and is a great pit stop for refreshments on route. Along the path walk towards The Lizard is an interesting feature known as *The Devils Frying Pan*, a cave whose roof collapsed leaving its entrance as a bridge and a boulder filled bag which is seen to ‘boil’ during rough weather. 📸 @readyfortakeoff.me
C A D G W I T H C O R N W A L L ‘Cove of the thicket’, this village and fishing port in Cornwall used to be densely wooded back in medieval times, and fishing subsidised local farmers livelihoods. Sitting on the Lizard Peninsula, a treacherous coastline due to submerged rocks and weather factors, there a numerous wrecks on the rocks nearby, which means this area is popular with deep sea diving. A popular holiday destination, the village hosts a regatta, Morris dancing, summer bbqs, and regular singing by the Cadgwith Singers in the Cadgwith Cove Inn, a 400 year old pub. The South West Coast Path traverses the village, and is a great pit stop for refreshments on route. Along the path walk towards The Lizard is an interesting feature known as *The Devils Frying Pan*, a cave whose roof collapsed leaving its entrance as a bridge and a boulder filled bag which is seen to ‘boil’ during rough weather. 📸 @readyfortakeoff.me
T H E  D E V I L S  A R S E

T H E  P E A K  C A V E R N 
C A S T L E T O N 
D E R B Y S H I R E 
The Peak Cavern, also known as the Devil's Arse[1][2] (so called because of the flatulent-sounding noises from inside the cave when flood water is draining away), is one of the four show caves in Castleton, Derbyshire, England. Peakshole Water flows through and out of the cave.

Unlike the others it is completely natural, The cave system is the largest in the Peak District, and the main entrance is the largest cave entrance in Britain. Until 1915 the cave was home to some of Britain's last troglodytes (the cave-houses at Kinver Edge near Kidderminster were populated until the 1950s), who lived in houses built inside the cave mouth, and made a living from rope making, while the depths of the cave were known as a haven for bandits. In legend, it was where thieves' cant was created by a meeting between Cock Lorel, leader of the rogues, and Giles Hather, the King of the Gypsies.

The name of the cave was changed to "Peak Cavern" in 1880 in order not to cause offence to Queen Victoria during a visit for a concert. 
This picture is from the walk leading up to the cavern, the very quintessentially classic English hamlet, Castleton, known for its wealth of local history, and for being a major Peak District walking centre. 📸 @g60golf1980
T H E D E V I L S A R S E T H E P E A K C A V E R N C A S T L E T O N D E R B Y S H I R E The Peak Cavern, also known as the Devil's Arse[1][2] (so called because of the flatulent-sounding noises from inside the cave when flood water is draining away), is one of the four show caves in Castleton, Derbyshire, England. Peakshole Water flows through and out of the cave. Unlike the others it is completely natural, The cave system is the largest in the Peak District, and the main entrance is the largest cave entrance in Britain. Until 1915 the cave was home to some of Britain's last troglodytes (the cave-houses at Kinver Edge near Kidderminster were populated until the 1950s), who lived in houses built inside the cave mouth, and made a living from rope making, while the depths of the cave were known as a haven for bandits. In legend, it was where thieves' cant was created by a meeting between Cock Lorel, leader of the rogues, and Giles Hather, the King of the Gypsies. The name of the cave was changed to "Peak Cavern" in 1880 in order not to cause offence to Queen Victoria during a visit for a concert. This picture is from the walk leading up to the cavern, the very quintessentially classic English hamlet, Castleton, known for its wealth of local history, and for being a major Peak District walking centre. 📸 @g60golf1980
U P N O R .  K E N T 
Lower Upnor and Upper Upnor are two small villages in Medway, Kent, England

The lower part is the residential area, wand where all the sailing and yacht clubs are. Here you can find The London Stones. They mark the limit of the charter rights of London fishermen. The older stone is dated 1204.

The upper part consists of a cobbled village street with many houses displaying Kentish weatherboarding, some are Grade II listed, which lead up to Upnor Castle.

A skeleton of a Straight-tusked Elephant was excavated in 1911, during the construction of the Royal Engineers' Upnor Hard. 📸 @bloomsandtea
U P N O R . K E N T Lower Upnor and Upper Upnor are two small villages in Medway, Kent, England The lower part is the residential area, wand where all the sailing and yacht clubs are. Here you can find The London Stones. They mark the limit of the charter rights of London fishermen. The older stone is dated 1204. The upper part consists of a cobbled village street with many houses displaying Kentish weatherboarding, some are Grade II listed, which lead up to Upnor Castle. A skeleton of a Straight-tusked Elephant was excavated in 1911, during the construction of the Royal Engineers' Upnor Hard. 📸 @bloomsandtea
W I L L A S T O N 
C H E S H I R E 
Villages traditions... 1

In the quiet village of Willaston, near Nantwich, Cheshire, there is a very strange but ‘charming’ tradition held annually. ‘Worm Charming World Championships’. Worm charmers around the globe descend on Willaston Primary Academy every June, this quirky competition is known around the world and hundreds compete for the Best Worm Charmer trophy. 
Dating back to the 1980’s when local farmers son Tom Shufflebotham charmed a total of 511 worms out of the ground in half an hour. 
Also known as worm grunting and worm fiddling, 600 people attend Willaston each year to watch or charm their plots with the hopes of drawing more worms to the surface than anyone else. 
The current world record for worm charming is held by Miss S Smith and Mr M Smith who won the championship in 2009 with 567 worms. 📸 @tunnelbreeze
W I L L A S T O N C H E S H I R E Villages traditions... 1 In the quiet village of Willaston, near Nantwich, Cheshire, there is a very strange but ‘charming’ tradition held annually. ‘Worm Charming World Championships’. Worm charmers around the globe descend on Willaston Primary Academy every June, this quirky competition is known around the world and hundreds compete for the Best Worm Charmer trophy. Dating back to the 1980’s when local farmers son Tom Shufflebotham charmed a total of 511 worms out of the ground in half an hour. Also known as worm grunting and worm fiddling, 600 people attend Willaston each year to watch or charm their plots with the hopes of drawing more worms to the surface than anyone else. The current world record for worm charming is held by Miss S Smith and Mr M Smith who won the championship in 2009 with 567 worms. 📸 @tunnelbreeze