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Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashionweek2018
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashionweek2018 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous  Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout #Parisreviewed #Paris #beautifulmatters #art #lookingforfrenchhusban #18thcenturyfrance #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #18thcentury #antiques #lgbttravel #boiserie #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyatchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #parisfashion
Just a little over a week ago Le Château de Hopkins toured the fabulous Hôtel de Soubise which is a block away from Le Château de Hopkins Paris. Although I have been to this museum over twenty times it has been about 4 years since my last visit to this city mansion! The Hôtel de Soubise was built for the Prince and Princess de Soubise on the site of a semi-fortified manor house named the Grand-Chantier built in 1375 for connétable Olivier de Clisson, that had formerly been a property of the Templars. On March 27, 1700, François de Rohan, prince de Soubise bought the Hôtel de Clisson, lately de Guise, and asked the architect Pierre-Alexis Delamair to remodel it completely. Works started in 1704. His wife Anne de Rohan-Chabot, one time mistress of Louis XIV (their affair is thought to have funded the purchase of the building) died here in 1709. Interiors by Germain Boffrand, created about 1735–40 and partly dismantled, are accounted among the high points of the rococo style in France. They constituted the new apartments of the Prince on the ground floor and the Princesse on the piano nobile, both of which featured oval salons looking into the garden. These rooms have changed very little since the 18th century, including the Chambre du prince, Salon ovale du prince, Chambre d'apparat de la princesse and the very fine Salon ovale de la princesse with gilded carvings and mirror-glass embedded in the boiserie and ceiling canvases and overdoors by François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and Carle Van Loo. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #18thcenturyfrance  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #18thcentury  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #boiserie  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyatchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #parisfashion 
Today's episode of “Why 🤷‍♀️your shorts & pants 👖be so tight? “ is coming to you loud, live and in color from beautiful Place des Victoires! #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #why🤷‍♀️yourpaints👖besotight #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
Today's episode of “Why 🤷‍♀️your shorts & pants 👖be so tight? “ is coming to you loud, live and in color from beautiful Place des Victoires! #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #why 🤷‍♀️yourpaints👖besotight #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
Today's episode of “Why 🤷‍♀️your shorts & pants 👖be so tight? “ is coming to you loud, live and in color from beautiful Pont des Arts!  #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #why🤷‍♀️yourpaints👖besotight #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
Today's episode of “Why 🤷‍♀️your shorts & pants 👖be so tight? “ is coming to you loud, live and in color from beautiful Pont des Arts! #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #why 🤷‍♀️yourpaints👖besotight #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
The Cirque d'Hiver ("Winter Circus"), located at 110 rue Amelot (at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème), has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts, and other events, including exhibitions of Turkish wrestling and even fashion shows. The theatre was designed by the architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff and was opened by Emperor Napoleon III on 11 December 1852 as the Cirque Napoléon. The orchestral concerts of Jules Etienne Pasdeloup were inaugurated at the Cirque Napoléon on 27 October 1861 and continued for more than twenty years. The theatre was renamed Cirque d'Hiver in 1870. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
Although Le Château de Hopkins is back in Creole New Orleans. I’m 20,000 photos behind on my two month vacation in France 🇫🇷 this Summer on Instagram so posting them now! The Gay bakery 👩‍🍳 in the Gayberhood. Even the Wasp approve of the 🍆 shaped bread 🥖😳❤️🇫🇷👌🏽! #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #gayberhood
Although Le Château de Hopkins is back in Creole New Orleans. I’m 20,000 photos behind on my two month vacation in France 🇫🇷 this Summer on Instagram so posting them now! The Gay bakery 👩‍🍳 in the Gayberhood. Even the Wasp approve of the 🍆 shaped bread 🥖😳❤️🇫🇷👌🏽! #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #gayberhood 
Paris France 🇫🇷 right now. Honey in the lap of luxury. A good girlfriend gifted this fabulous hotel room to Desiree Josephine Duplantier. I have a early flight tomorrow morning to Germany 🇩🇪. Thank you 🙏 Lisa! ❤️🇫🇷😍! #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #17arrondissement.
Paris France 🇫🇷 right now. Honey in the lap of luxury. A good girlfriend gifted this fabulous hotel room to Desiree Josephine Duplantier. I have a early flight tomorrow morning to Germany 🇩🇪. Thank you 🙏 Lisa! ❤️🇫🇷😍! #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #17arrondissement .
Paris France 🇫🇷 right now. Honey in the lap of luxury. A good girlfriend gifted this fabulous hotel room to Desiree Josephine Duplantier. I have a early flight tomorrow morning to Germany 🇩🇪. Thank you 🙏 Lisa! ❤️🇫🇷😍! #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #17arrondissement.
Paris France 🇫🇷 right now. Honey in the lap of luxury. A good girlfriend gifted this fabulous hotel room to Desiree Josephine Duplantier. I have a early flight tomorrow morning to Germany 🇩🇪. Thank you 🙏 Lisa! ❤️🇫🇷😍! #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #17arrondissement .
Today's episode of “Why 🤷‍♀️your pants 👖be so tight? “ is coming to you loud, live and in color from the beautiful and highly expensive 17th arrondissement of Paris. 😳! #pantyhose #why🤷‍♀️yourpaints👖besotight #tightpants #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #streetart #thegoodlife
Today's episode of “Why 🤷‍♀️your pants 👖be so tight? “ is coming to you loud, live and in color from the beautiful and highly expensive 17th arrondissement of Paris. 😳! #pantyhose  #why 🤷‍♀️yourpaints👖besotight #tightpants  #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #streetart  #thegoodlife 
Today Le Château de Hopkins move from the gayberhood of the Marais to the 17th arrondissement of Paris. A wonderful Bourgeoisie neighborhood with amazing 😉 French architecture created during the Belle Époque period between 1871 and the beginning of the First World War in 1914. This area was settled and developed by wealthy bankers during the 2th part of the 19th century. #thisisparis #visitparis #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban #streetart #travel #travelphotography #travelholic #traveldiaries #travelogue #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban #travelblog #travelblogger #decorativearts #antiques #lgbttravel #frenchantiques #France #French #parisdetails #18thcenturyarchitecture #thegoodlife #parisarchitecture #17arrondissement
Today Le Château de Hopkins move from the gayberhood of the Marais to the 17th arrondissement of Paris. A wonderful Bourgeoisie neighborhood with amazing 😉 French architecture created during the Belle Époque period between 1871 and the beginning of the First World War in 1914. This area was settled and developed by wealthy bankers during the 2th part of the 19th century. #thisisparis  #visitparis  #timeoutparis  #mysecretparis  #paristimeout  #Parisreviewed  #Paris  #beautifulmatters  #art  #lookingforfrenchhusban  #streetart  #travel  #travelphotography  #travelholic  #traveldiaries  #travelogue  #Desireelookingforafrenchhusban  #travelblog  #travelblogger  #decorativearts  #antiques  #lgbttravel  #frenchantiques  #France  #French  #parisdetails  #18thcenturyarchitecture  #thegoodlife  #parisarchitecture  #17arrondissement