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I don't want to waste anyone's time or money. I want to give people some truth and positive heart lift.-Yasiin Bey
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Today We Commemorate the life of legendary hip hop recording artist, actor and activist from Brooklyn #YasiinBey.

With the release of "Universal Magnetic" (1996) Mos became an underground favorite in the hip hop world, leading to his legendary collaboration with Talib Kweli. The two formed Black Star whose debut album, #MosDef and Talib Kweli Are #BlackStar, would become one of the most critically acclaimed hip-hop albums.

Brooklyn Born and Bred. Mos Def was born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. ... As Mos Def would later rap in his autobiographical song, "Life in Marvelous Times:" "Basic survival requires super heroics/ No space in the budget for a cape

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#DayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveHipHopLegends
#WeLoveBlackActors
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers - #regrann
I don't want to waste anyone's time or money. I want to give people some truth and positive heart lift.-Yasiin Bey ____________________________________________ Today We Commemorate the life of legendary hip hop recording artist, actor and activist from Brooklyn #YasiinBey . With the release of "Universal Magnetic" (1996) Mos became an underground favorite in the hip hop world, leading to his legendary collaboration with Talib Kweli. The two formed Black Star whose debut album, #MosDef  and Talib Kweli Are #BlackStar , would become one of the most critically acclaimed hip-hop albums. Brooklyn Born and Bred. Mos Def was born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. ... As Mos Def would later rap in his autobiographical song, "Life in Marvelous Times:" "Basic survival requires super heroics/ No space in the budget for a cape #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #DayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveHipHopLegends  #WeLoveBlackActors  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  - #regrann 
-  You have to experience life, make observations, and ask questions.
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I don't want to waste anyone's time or money. I want to give people some truth and positive heart lift.
_____________________________________________
Brooklyn Born and Bred. Mos Def was born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. ... As Mos Def would later rap in his autobiographical song, "Life in Marvelous Times:" "Basic survival requires super heroics/ No space in the budget for a cape

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember11 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveHipHopLegends - #regrann
- You have to experience life, make observations, and ask questions. _____________________________________________ I don't want to waste anyone's time or money. I want to give people some truth and positive heart lift. _____________________________________________ Brooklyn Born and Bred. Mos Def was born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. ... As Mos Def would later rap in his autobiographical song, "Life in Marvelous Times:" "Basic survival requires super heroics/ No space in the budget for a cape #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember11  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveHipHopLegends  - #regrann 
"I have no confidence issues with the impact or the quality of the music. No one in hip-hop, before this point and to this point, with all due respect, has done this." #MosDef 🎂
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Definitely In my Top 5 🏆#BestRapperAlive
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Today We Commemorate the life of legendary hip hop recording artist, actor and activist from Brooklyn Yasiin Bey

Hip-hop star Yasiin Bey took the stage at the ONE Musicfest for what appeared to be the last performance of his career.

But the rapper also known as Mos Def said in a backstage interview with The Associated Press on Saturday night, he'll continue creating and will return to the public spotlight in the future. He performed for more than an hour at the eighth annual ONE Musicfest in Atlanta, performing popular songs from "The New Danger," ''UMI Says" to "Black Radio." "I enjoyed it today," he said. "So if I get a chance to do it again in another way, I'll just give it my all. I'm always going to be creating. ... I'm not going to disappear if I stop rap or doing it in a certain type of way.

Brooklyn Born and Bred. Mos Def was born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. ... As Mos Def would later rap in his autobiographical song, "Life in Marvelous Times:" "Basic survival requires super heroics/ No space in the budget for a cape

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember11 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveHipHopLegends
#WeLoveBlackActors
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers - #regrann
"I have no confidence issues with the impact or the quality of the music. No one in hip-hop, before this point and to this point, with all due respect, has done this." #MosDef  🎂 ____________________________________________ Definitely In my Top 5 🏆#BestRapperAlive  ______________________________________________ Today We Commemorate the life of legendary hip hop recording artist, actor and activist from Brooklyn Yasiin Bey Hip-hop star Yasiin Bey took the stage at the ONE Musicfest for what appeared to be the last performance of his career. But the rapper also known as Mos Def said in a backstage interview with The Associated Press on Saturday night, he'll continue creating and will return to the public spotlight in the future. He performed for more than an hour at the eighth annual ONE Musicfest in Atlanta, performing popular songs from "The New Danger," ''UMI Says" to "Black Radio." "I enjoyed it today," he said. "So if I get a chance to do it again in another way, I'll just give it my all. I'm always going to be creating. ... I'm not going to disappear if I stop rap or doing it in a certain type of way. Brooklyn Born and Bred. Mos Def was born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. ... As Mos Def would later rap in his autobiographical song, "Life in Marvelous Times:" "Basic survival requires super heroics/ No space in the budget for a cape #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember11  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveHipHopLegends  #WeLoveBlackActors  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  - #regrann 
Who was Big Mama Thornton?

#BigMamaThorton was a blues singer whose songs, including "Hound Dog" and "Ball and Chain," influenced the development of the rock and roll genre.
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow Blues legend Big Mama Thornton was born in Ariton, Alabama on December 11, 1926. Known for her powerful voice and sexually explicit lyrics, Thornton was the original performer of the hit song "Hound Dog," commonly associated with Elvis Presley, and "Ball and Chain," covered by Janis Joplin. She died of a heart attack in Los Angeles, California, on July 25, 1984.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#@Regran_ed from @heru_behutet -  Who was Big Mama Thornton?

#BigMamaThorton was a blues singer whose songs, including "Hound Dog" and "Ball and Chain," influenced the development of the rock and roll genre.
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow Blues legend Big Mama Thornton was born in Ariton, Alabama on December 11, 1926. Known for her powerful voice and sexually explicit lyrics, Thornton was the original performer of the hit song "Hound Dog," commonly associated with Elvis Presley, and "Ball and Chain," covered by Janis Joplin. She died of a heart attack in Los Angeles, California, on July 25, 1984.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember11 
#WeLoveBluesLegends
 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory - #regrann
Who was Big Mama Thornton? #BigMamaThorton  was a blues singer whose songs, including "Hound Dog" and "Ball and Chain," influenced the development of the rock and roll genre. #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  Blues legend Big Mama Thornton was born in Ariton, Alabama on December 11, 1926. Known for her powerful voice and sexually explicit lyrics, Thornton was the original performer of the hit song "Hound Dog," commonly associated with Elvis Presley, and "Ball and Chain," covered by Janis Joplin. She died of a heart attack in Los Angeles, California, on July 25, 1984. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #@Regran_ed from @heru_behutet - Who was Big Mama Thornton? #BigMamaThorton  was a blues singer whose songs, including "Hound Dog" and "Ball and Chain," influenced the development of the rock and roll genre. #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  Blues legend Big Mama Thornton was born in Ariton, Alabama on December 11, 1926. Known for her powerful voice and sexually explicit lyrics, Thornton was the original performer of the hit song "Hound Dog," commonly associated with Elvis Presley, and "Ball and Chain," covered by Janis Joplin. She died of a heart attack in Los Angeles, California, on July 25, 1984. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember11  #WeLoveBluesLegends  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  - #regrann 
"With stand-up, it's right there, that night, in your face.Stand-up keeps you on your toes because it's instant. With TV and movies, you have to wait for the numbers to come in to see what happened at the box office."
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" I come from a blue-collar town - and being from that place, you learn not to let anybody take advantage of you. You don't let people mistreat you. You stand up for what's right."
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Mo'Nique was born on December 11, 1967, in Baltimore, Maryland.
Monique Imes. Was one of three children born to Steven Imes Jr. and his wife Alice, Mo'Nique has parlayed an extremely successful stand-up profession into a career that's seen her become an actress, author, clothing designer and even the host of her own late-night talk show.
Mo'Nique got her start as a young college student when, on a dare from her brother Steven, she took the stage one night during an open mic session at the Comedy Factory Outlet in Baltimore. The audience loved her, and the club owners offered her the chance to host her own show at a local beauty parlor the following week for $25.  She started in stand-up comedy on a dare and was soon appearing on It's Showtime at the Apollo and Def Comedy Jam. She made appearances on Moesha and The Bernie Mac Show before landing a starring role on The Parkers. In 2010, Mo'Nique won an Academy Award for her performance in Precious, a film based on the novel Push by Sapphire.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember #BlackHistoryofDecember11
#WeLoveBlackActors
#WeLoveBlackComedians
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory - #regrann
"With stand-up, it's right there, that night, in your face.Stand-up keeps you on your toes because it's instant. With TV and movies, you have to wait for the numbers to come in to see what happened at the box office." _____________________________________________ " I come from a blue-collar town - and being from that place, you learn not to let anybody take advantage of you. You don't let people mistreat you. You stand up for what's right." _____________________________________________ Mo'Nique was born on December 11, 1967, in Baltimore, Maryland. Monique Imes. Was one of three children born to Steven Imes Jr. and his wife Alice, Mo'Nique has parlayed an extremely successful stand-up profession into a career that's seen her become an actress, author, clothing designer and even the host of her own late-night talk show. Mo'Nique got her start as a young college student when, on a dare from her brother Steven, she took the stage one night during an open mic session at the Comedy Factory Outlet in Baltimore. The audience loved her, and the club owners offered her the chance to host her own show at a local beauty parlor the following week for $25. She started in stand-up comedy on a dare and was soon appearing on It's Showtime at the Apollo and Def Comedy Jam. She made appearances on Moesha and The Bernie Mac Show before landing a starring role on The Parkers. In 2010, Mo'Nique won an Academy Award for her performance in Precious, a film based on the novel Push by Sapphire. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofDecember11  #WeLoveBlackActors  #WeLoveBlackComedians  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  - #regrann 
"Thoven-Bey"
Who Was Ludwig van Beethoven?
#MoorHistory 🎼📚🎓
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow 🎼🎓
#LudwigvanBeethoven (December 1770 to March 26, 1827) was a German pianist and composer widely considered the greatest of all time.
How could Beethoven, living in 19th-century Vienna, have garnered a ‘precise knowledge’ of west African polyrhythmic traditions? 
This thesis rests on the argument that Beethoven wanted to conceal his African origins. It is suggested that his father was Frederick II of Prussia and his mother one of the king’s kammermohr, African room servants. (This claim is based on an entry in the 19th-century Dictionnaire Historique des Musiciens and is part of a long-standing tradition of turning great men into princes by genetic default, thus proving the essential elevation of royal blood. It will surprise many since Frederick II’s homosexuality is well-known - it’s several degrees of bonkers-ness above the more long-standing theory from many purveyors of the Beethoven-was-black idea: as Rinehart says, which has it that his mother’s family traces its lineage back to Spanish-controlled Flanders; Beethoven’s blackness is thanks to from the close connection between the Spanish and the Moors.) #BlackBeethoven
#MfalmeHatariMaarifaVideo
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#DayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistoryofDecember - #regrann
"Thoven-Bey" Who Was Ludwig van Beethoven? #MoorHistory  🎼📚🎓 #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  🎼🎓 #LudwigvanBeethoven  (December 1770 to March 26, 1827) was a German pianist and composer widely considered the greatest of all time. How could Beethoven, living in 19th-century Vienna, have garnered a ‘precise knowledge’ of west African polyrhythmic traditions? This thesis rests on the argument that Beethoven wanted to conceal his African origins. It is suggested that his father was Frederick II of Prussia and his mother one of the king’s kammermohr, African room servants. (This claim is based on an entry in the 19th-century Dictionnaire Historique des Musiciens and is part of a long-standing tradition of turning great men into princes by genetic default, thus proving the essential elevation of royal blood. It will surprise many since Frederick II’s homosexuality is well-known - it’s several degrees of bonkers-ness above the more long-standing theory from many purveyors of the Beethoven-was-black idea: as Rinehart says, which has it that his mother’s family traces its lineage back to Spanish-controlled Flanders; Beethoven’s blackness is thanks to from the close connection between the Spanish and the Moors.) #BlackBeethoven  #MfalmeHatariMaarifaVideo  #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #DayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  - #regrann 
🇱🇷 What's Wrong With Liberia?
(Part VI of VI) Understanding The Complex History...
#AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow
On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor. They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission.

The #LiberianCivilWar began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe. The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf, who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor, was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia terminated its power.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistory365 
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#AmericoLiberianHistory
#AmericoLiberian -
🇱🇷 What's Wrong With Liberia? (Part VI of VI) Understanding The Complex History... #AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow  On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor . They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission. The #LiberianCivilWar  began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS  intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor  to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague  for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe . The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf , who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor , was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia  terminated its power. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #AmericoLiberianHistory  #AmericoLiberian  -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia?
(Part V of VI) Understanding The Complex History...
#AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow
On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor. They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission.

The #LiberianCivilWar began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe. The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf, who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor, was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia terminated its power.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistory365 
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#AmericoLiberianHistory
#AmericoLiberian -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia? (Part V of VI) Understanding The Complex History... #AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow  On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor . They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission. The #LiberianCivilWar  began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS  intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor  to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague  for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe . The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf , who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor , was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia  terminated its power. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #AmericoLiberianHistory  #AmericoLiberian  -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia?
(Part IV of VI) Understanding The Complex History...
#AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow
On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor. They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission.

The #LiberianCivilWar began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe. The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf, who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor, was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia terminated its power.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistory365 
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#AmericoLiberianHistory
#AmericoLiberian -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia? (Part IV of VI) Understanding The Complex History... #AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow  On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor . They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission. The #LiberianCivilWar  began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS  intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor  to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague  for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe . The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf , who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor , was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia  terminated its power. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #AmericoLiberianHistory  #AmericoLiberian  -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia?
(Part III of VI) Understanding The Complex History...
#AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow
On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor. They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission.

The #LiberianCivilWar began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe. The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf, who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor, was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia terminated its power.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistory365 
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#AmericoLiberianHistory
#AmericoLiberian -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia? (Part III of VI) Understanding The Complex History... #AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow  On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor . They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission. The #LiberianCivilWar  began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS  intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor  to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague  for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe . The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf , who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor , was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia  terminated its power. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #AmericoLiberianHistory  #AmericoLiberian  -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia?
(Part II of VI) Understanding The Complex History...
#AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow
On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor. They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission.

The #LiberianCivilWar began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe. The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf, who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor, was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia terminated its power.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistory365 
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#SamuelKDoe
#JosephJenkinsRoberts
#StephenAllenBenson
#DanielBashierWarner
#JamesSpriggsPayne
#EdwardJamesRoye
#JamesSkivringSmith 
#AnthonyWilliamGardiner
#AlfredFrancisRussell
#HilaryRichardWright
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#AmericoLiberianHistory
#AmericoLiberians
#AmericoLiberian
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia? (Part II of VI) Understanding The Complex History... #AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow  On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor . They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission. The #LiberianCivilWar  began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS  intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor  to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague  for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe . The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf , who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor , was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia  terminated its power. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #SamuelKDoe  #JosephJenkinsRoberts  #StephenAllenBenson  #DanielBashierWarner  #JamesSpriggsPayne  #EdwardJamesRoye  #JamesSkivringSmith   #AnthonyWilliamGardiner  #AlfredFrancisRussell  #HilaryRichardWright  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #AmericoLiberianHistory  #AmericoLiberians  #AmericoLiberian 
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia?
(Part I of VI) Understanding The Complex History...
#AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow
On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor. They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission.

The #LiberianCivilWar began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe. The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf, who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor, was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia terminated its power.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistory365 
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#AmericoLiberianHistory
#AmericoLiberian -
🇱🇷What's Wrong With Liberia? (Part I of VI) Understanding The Complex History... #AfrikanHistoryYouShouldKnow  On December 10, 2003, the Liberian conflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. This conflict occurred in Liberia’s bloodiest day since an August 2003 peace agreement. The violence was started by militiamen loyal to ousted #PresidentCharlesTaylor . They demanded cash in exchange for giving up their guns. It was the first serious threat to a United Nations backed disarmament project. The fighting killed at least nine Liberians. U.N. peacekeepers marked the first casualty of their two and a half month-old Liberia mission. The #LiberianCivilWar  began in 1999 and ended in October 2003, when #ECOWAS  intervened to stop the rebel siege on Monrovia and exiled #CharlesTaylor  to Nigeria until he was arrested in 2006 and taken to #TheHague  for his trial. By the conclusion of the final war, more than 250,000 people had been killed and nearly 1 million displaced. Half that number was to be repatriated in 2005, at the election of Liberia's first democratic President since the initial 1980 coup d'état of #SamuelDoe . The incumbent #EllenJohnsonSirleaf , who initially was a strong supporter of #CharlesTaylor , was inaugurated in January 2006 and the #NationalTransitionalGovernmentofLiberia  terminated its power. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #AmericoLiberianHistory  #AmericoLiberian  -
Who was Edwin C. Berry?
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#EdwinCBerry, a Black businessman, was born on December 10, 1854 in Athens, Ohio.

Berry was often called the "Black Horatio Algier" of Athens. He erected a 22-room hotel, Hotel Berry, one of the finest and most elegant hotels in Ohio in Athens. At the time of his retirement in 1921, he had a reputation as the most successful Black small-city hotel operator in the U.S. (1892). Berry was a member of the National Negro Business League and Trustee of Wilberforce University. Edwin Berry died 1931.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember10 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#WeLoveBlacKEnterprise
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
Who was Edwin C. Berry? #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #EdwinCBerry , a Black businessman, was born on December 10, 1854 in Athens, Ohio. Berry was often called the "Black Horatio Algier" of Athens. He erected a 22-room hotel, Hotel Berry, one of the finest and most elegant hotels in Ohio in Athens. At the time of his retirement in 1921, he had a reputation as the most successful Black small-city hotel operator in the U.S. (1892). Berry was a member of the National Negro Business League and Trustee of Wilberforce University. Edwin Berry died 1931. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlacKEnterprise  #LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite 
On December 10, 1846, Norbert Rillieux, a Black inventor and engineer, patented his revolutionary improvement in the cultivation and processing of sugar.

Rillieux was born into an aristocratic Creole family in New Orleans. He was the son of Vincent Rillieux, a white plantation owner, engineer and inventor, and his placée, #ConstanceVivant, a Free Person of Color. As a Creole, Norbert had access to education and privileges not available to lower-status blacks or slaves.  #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow 
Born free in New Orleans, #NorbertRillieux’s mother was Black and his father, a French engineer and plantation owner. After studying engineering at L’École Centrale, Rillieux became the school’s youngest instructor ever in the department of applied mechanics. There, he published many papers on steam technology. Rillieux returned to Louisiana in 1840 and, three years later patented the multiple-effect vacuum pan evaporator. This device heated the sugar cane juice in a partial vacuum, reducing its boiling point, allowing much greater fuel efficiency.

This innovation, adopted in sugar refining, escalated production, reduced the price, and was responsible for transforming sugar into a household item. Similar technology was subsequently developed for the production of soap, gelatin, and glue. Some have called Rillieux’s evaporator the greatest invention in the history of American chemical engineering. When post-Reconstruction conditions proved oppressive in Louisiana for African-Americans, Rillieux returned to Paris, serving as headmaster at L’École Centrale. He began to study Egyptology and helped decipher hieroglyphics. #NorbertRillieux died in 1894.
#BlackHistory365
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofOctober8
#BlackHistoryofMarch
#BlackEnterprise
#BlackHistoryofMarch5- #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
On December 10, 1846, Norbert Rillieux, a Black inventor and engineer, patented his revolutionary improvement in the cultivation and processing of sugar. Rillieux was born into an aristocratic Creole family in New Orleans. He was the son of Vincent Rillieux, a white plantation owner, engineer and inventor, and his placée, #ConstanceVivant , a Free Person of Color. As a Creole, Norbert had access to education and privileges not available to lower-status blacks or slaves. #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  Born free in New Orleans, #NorbertRillieux ’s mother was Black and his father, a French engineer and plantation owner. After studying engineering at L’École Centrale, Rillieux became the school’s youngest instructor ever in the department of applied mechanics. There, he published many papers on steam technology. Rillieux returned to Louisiana in 1840 and, three years later patented the multiple-effect vacuum pan evaporator. This device heated the sugar cane juice in a partial vacuum, reducing its boiling point, allowing much greater fuel efficiency. This innovation, adopted in sugar refining, escalated production, reduced the price, and was responsible for transforming sugar into a household item. Similar technology was subsequently developed for the production of soap, gelatin, and glue. Some have called Rillieux’s evaporator the greatest invention in the history of American chemical engineering. When post-Reconstruction conditions proved oppressive in Louisiana for African-Americans, Rillieux returned to Paris, serving as headmaster at L’École Centrale. He began to study Egyptology and helped decipher hieroglyphics. #NorbertRillieux  died in 1894. #BlackHistory365  #LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofOctober8  #BlackHistoryofMarch  #BlackEnterprise  #BlackHistoryofMarch5 - #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow 
#Repost @bone14nov
・・・
RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. 
#OssieDavis and his wife and acting partner, #RubyDee, helped to open doors and widen horizons for Black people on stage and screen. They fought zealously for Human Rights from Washington to Hollywood.

When the couple was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004, Mr. Davis stated: "We knew that every time we got a job and every time we were onstage, America was looking to make judgments about all Black folks on the basis of how you looked, how you sounded, how you carried yourself. So any role you had was a role that was involved in the struggle for Black identification. You couldn't escape it....
"On December 9, 1948, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee took the day off from rehearsals for the play, "The Smile of the World. They rode a bus to Jersey City to be married by the Rev. Dr. William A. Epps, Sr.

The 56 year marriage was one of mutual respect and dignity. They shared a passion for equality, social responsibility and justice, and are considered American treasures.” #BlackHistory #BlackExcellence
#BlackLove #TodayInBlackHistory

We gotta make sure and put our people on as we make it to the top like our ancestors did ... it don't mean don't work with others, but make sure you workin for us first till we fully functional as an economic power like #asians european #jews are and the #latinx will be within the next generation or two #blacktowork #blacktobusiness #ossiedavis #rubydee ^ 🤴🏿👸🏿✊🏿✊🏿
#Repost  @bone14nov ・・・ RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. #OssieDavis  and his wife and acting partner, #RubyDee , helped to open doors and widen horizons for Black people on stage and screen. They fought zealously for Human Rights from Washington to Hollywood. When the couple was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004, Mr. Davis stated: "We knew that every time we got a job and every time we were onstage, America was looking to make judgments about all Black folks on the basis of how you looked, how you sounded, how you carried yourself. So any role you had was a role that was involved in the struggle for Black identification. You couldn't escape it.... "On December 9, 1948, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee took the day off from rehearsals for the play, "The Smile of the World. They rode a bus to Jersey City to be married by the Rev. Dr. William A. Epps, Sr. The 56 year marriage was one of mutual respect and dignity. They shared a passion for equality, social responsibility and justice, and are considered American treasures.” #BlackHistory  #BlackExcellence  #BlackLove  #TodayInBlackHistory  We gotta make sure and put our people on as we make it to the top like our ancestors did ... it don't mean don't work with others, but make sure you workin for us first till we fully functional as an economic power like #asians  european #jews  are and the #latinx  will be within the next generation or two #blacktowork  #blacktobusiness  #ossiedavis  #rubydee  ^ 🤴🏿👸🏿✊🏿✊🏿
#featuredcouple ❣️#lovewins ❣️ Repost from @bone14nov on Instagram: “RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948.  #OssieDavis and his wife and…” using @RepostRegramApp - RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. 
#OssieDavis and his wife and acting partner, #RubyDee, helped to open doors and widen horizons for Black people on stage and screen. They fought zealously for Human Rights from Washington to Hollywood.

When the couple was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004, Mr. Davis stated: "We knew that every time we got a job and every time we were onstage, America was looking to make judgments about all Black folks on the basis of how you looked, how you sounded, how you carried yourself. So any role you had was a role that was involved in the struggle for Black identification. You couldn't escape it....
"On December 9, 1948, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee took the day off from rehearsals for the play, "The Smile of the World. They rode a bus to Jersey City to be married by the Rev. Dr. William A. Epps, Sr.

The 56 year marriage was one of mutual respect and dignity. They shared a passion for equality, social responsibility and justice, and are considered American treasures.” #BlackHistory #BlackExcellence
#BlackLove #TodayInBlackHistory
#featuredcouple  ❣️#lovewins  ❣️ Repost from @bone14nov on Instagram: “RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. #OssieDavis  and his wife and…” using @RepostRegramApp - RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. #OssieDavis  and his wife and acting partner, #RubyDee , helped to open doors and widen horizons for Black people on stage and screen. They fought zealously for Human Rights from Washington to Hollywood. When the couple was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004, Mr. Davis stated: "We knew that every time we got a job and every time we were onstage, America was looking to make judgments about all Black folks on the basis of how you looked, how you sounded, how you carried yourself. So any role you had was a role that was involved in the struggle for Black identification. You couldn't escape it.... "On December 9, 1948, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee took the day off from rehearsals for the play, "The Smile of the World. They rode a bus to Jersey City to be married by the Rev. Dr. William A. Epps, Sr. The 56 year marriage was one of mutual respect and dignity. They shared a passion for equality, social responsibility and justice, and are considered American treasures.” #BlackHistory  #BlackExcellence  #BlackLove  #TodayInBlackHistory 
#JamesLafayette’s birth in 1748 is celebrated on this date. #JamesArmisteadLafayette was a  slave and American patriot.

#CharlesAvery was born on this date in 1784. He was a White European merchant, businessman and abolitionist.

#WilliamLloydGarrison was born this date in 1805. He was a White American abolitionist and newspaper publisher.
The struggles of all oppressed peoples for freedom built his kind character as a youth. He expressed this in articles he wrote anonymously or under the pseudonym Airsides, in the Herald and other newspapers. He tried to awaken Northerners from their apathy over the question of slavery in America.

On this date in 1846, #NorbertRillieux, a Black inventor and engineer, patented his revolutionary improvement in the cultivation and processing of sugar.

#EdwinCBerry, a Black businessman, was born on this date in 1854 in Athens, Ohio.

On this date in 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was awarded The Nobel Peace Prize.

#OtisRayRedding Jr.  Died in a plane crash on this date in 1967.

Actress #RavenSymoné born Raven-Symoné Christina Pearman on this date 1985, in Atlanta, Georgia. 
On this date in 2003, the #Liberianconflict continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting.

On this date in 2003, A Florida appeals court threw out a African American boy’s conviction for beating a 6-year-old playmate to death.

The case spotlighted a Florida law that says child murderers must be locked away for the rest of their lives. In West Palm Beach, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeals ordered a new trial for Lionel Tate, now 16, saying his mental competency should have been evaluated before his trial. He was tried as an adult and is serving life without parole at a maximum-security juvenile prison.
#BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear
#BlackHistoryofDecember10
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember
#TodayInBlackHistory
#JamesLafayette ’s birth in 1748 is celebrated on this date. #JamesArmisteadLafayette  was a slave and American patriot. #CharlesAvery  was born on this date in 1784. He was a White European merchant, businessman and abolitionist. #WilliamLloydGarrison  was born this date in 1805. He was a White American abolitionist and newspaper publisher. The struggles of all oppressed peoples for freedom built his kind character as a youth. He expressed this in articles he wrote anonymously or under the pseudonym Airsides, in the Herald and other newspapers. He tried to awaken Northerners from their apathy over the question of slavery in America. On this date in 1846, #NorbertRillieux , a Black inventor and engineer, patented his revolutionary improvement in the cultivation and processing of sugar. #EdwinCBerry , a Black businessman, was born on this date in 1854 in Athens, Ohio. On this date in 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was awarded The Nobel Peace Prize. #OtisRayRedding  Jr. Died in a plane crash on this date in 1967. Actress #RavenSymoné  born Raven-Symoné Christina Pearman on this date 1985, in Atlanta, Georgia. On this date in 2003, the #Liberianconflict  continued. In Monrovia, peace keepers confronted gunmen on a rampage of burning, shooting and looting. On this date in 2003, A Florida appeals court threw out a African American boy’s conviction for beating a 6-year-old playmate to death. The case spotlighted a Florida law that says child murderers must be locked away for the rest of their lives. In West Palm Beach, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeals ordered a new trial for Lionel Tate, now 16, saying his mental competency should have been evaluated before his trial. He was tried as an adult and is serving life without parole at a maximum-security juvenile prison. #BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember  #TodayInBlackHistory 
Donald Hollowell 
was an prominent Civil Rights Attorney during the Civil Rights Era!
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#DonaldHollowell moved to Atlanta and opened a law practice . He became one of the leading Civil Right's attorneys in the country, mentoring a host of young black attorneys, including Vernon Jordan and Horace Ward. In 1966, Hollowell accepted an appointment from President Lyndon B. Johnson as the first regional director of the new Equal Opportunity Commission, which monitors workplace discrimination. He remained at the EEOC as regional attorney until 1985 and was later considered for a federal or state judgeship.

Through his career he was regarded as one of the preeminent Civil Rights attorneys in the South, consistently at the center of historic events. Hollowell's work and contributions to the movement during the 1950s through 1960s, as an attorney, changed the face of history throughout Georgia and changed the lives of its people. Hollowell was closely associated with two pivotal Georgia Civil Rights cases, the integration of Atlanta Public Schools and the integration of the University of Georgia (1961), but for 40 years he was a quiet leader in the battle for Civil Rights in Georgia.

His legacy also includes desegregating buses in Augusta and schools in Macon, and freeing Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Reidsville Prison in the 1960s where he landed following a traffic offense. When Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta refused to allow black doctors to work in the hospital, Hollowell argued and won the Civil Rights case that had national impact. His success is credited to his hard work, integrity and unique abilities to understand the law and race relations. In 1998, Atlanta renamed Bankhead Highway in his honor.

Donald Hollowell died in Atlanta on Dec. 27, 2004, at age 87 from heart failure. Lane College, honored him posthumously following his death with the Order of the Dragon, the third person to receive the honor and Lane College also plans to name its library in his honor.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#BlackHistoryofDecember27
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
Donald Hollowell was an prominent Civil Rights Attorney during the Civil Rights Era! #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #DonaldHollowell  moved to Atlanta and opened a law practice . He became one of the leading Civil Right's attorneys in the country, mentoring a host of young black attorneys, including Vernon Jordan and Horace Ward. In 1966, Hollowell accepted an appointment from President Lyndon B. Johnson as the first regional director of the new Equal Opportunity Commission, which monitors workplace discrimination. He remained at the EEOC as regional attorney until 1985 and was later considered for a federal or state judgeship. Through his career he was regarded as one of the preeminent Civil Rights attorneys in the South, consistently at the center of historic events. Hollowell's work and contributions to the movement during the 1950s through 1960s, as an attorney, changed the face of history throughout Georgia and changed the lives of its people. Hollowell was closely associated with two pivotal Georgia Civil Rights cases, the integration of Atlanta Public Schools and the integration of the University of Georgia (1961), but for 40 years he was a quiet leader in the battle for Civil Rights in Georgia. His legacy also includes desegregating buses in Augusta and schools in Macon, and freeing Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Reidsville Prison in the 1960s where he landed following a traffic offense. When Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta refused to allow black doctors to work in the hospital, Hollowell argued and won the Civil Rights case that had national impact. His success is credited to his hard work, integrity and unique abilities to understand the law and race relations. In 1998, Atlanta renamed Bankhead Highway in his honor. Donald Hollowell died in Atlanta on Dec. 27, 2004, at age 87 from heart failure. Lane College, honored him posthumously following his death with the Order of the Dragon, the third person to receive the honor and Lane College also plans to name its library in his honor. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofDecember27  #WeLoveBlackLeadership  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
Remembering Otis Redding

When it became an R&B hit, Redding's solo career was on its way, though the hits didn't really start to take hold for about three years, when Mr. Pitiful, I've Been Loving You Too Long, I Can't Turn You Loose, and Respect (later turned into a huge pop smash by Aretha Franklin) were all big sellers. Redding wrote much of his own material, sometimes with guitarist Steve Cropper. Yet at the time, his success was primarily confined to the soul market; his singles charted only mildly on the pop listings.

He was nonetheless tremendously respected by many White groups, particularly the Rolling Stones, who covered Redding's "That's How Strong My Love Is" and "Pain in My Heart." One of Redding's biggest hits was a duet with fellow Stax star Carla Thomas, "Tramp," in 1967, the same year he performed to great acclamation at the Monterey Pop Festival.

Redding's biggest triumph, however, came just days before his death, when he recorded ("Sittin' on) The Dock of the Bay," a significant rise in the examination of intense personal emotions. One of the most influential soul singers of the 1960s, Redding embodied to many listeners the power of Southern "Deep Soul," an emotional voice with both party songs and emotionally aching ballads.

Redding died young, at the age of 26, in a plane crash in Wisconsin on December 10, 1967.
#WeLoveMotownLegends
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackHistoryofSeptember9
#BlackHistoryofSeptember
#BlackHistory365
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember10 - #regrann
Remembering Otis Redding When it became an R&B hit, Redding's solo career was on its way, though the hits didn't really start to take hold for about three years, when Mr. Pitiful, I've Been Loving You Too Long, I Can't Turn You Loose, and Respect (later turned into a huge pop smash by Aretha Franklin) were all big sellers. Redding wrote much of his own material, sometimes with guitarist Steve Cropper. Yet at the time, his success was primarily confined to the soul market; his singles charted only mildly on the pop listings. He was nonetheless tremendously respected by many White groups, particularly the Rolling Stones, who covered Redding's "That's How Strong My Love Is" and "Pain in My Heart." One of Redding's biggest hits was a duet with fellow Stax star Carla Thomas, "Tramp," in 1967, the same year he performed to great acclamation at the Monterey Pop Festival. Redding's biggest triumph, however, came just days before his death, when he recorded ("Sittin' on) The Dock of the Bay," a significant rise in the examination of intense personal emotions. One of the most influential soul singers of the 1960s, Redding embodied to many listeners the power of Southern "Deep Soul," an emotional voice with both party songs and emotionally aching ballads. Redding died young, at the age of 26, in a plane crash in Wisconsin on December 10, 1967. #WeLoveMotownLegends  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #BlackHistoryofSeptember9  #BlackHistoryofSeptember  #BlackHistory365  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  - #regrann 
Today in Black History,  we commemorate  the life and story of #RalphBunche. 
August 7, 1904: Diplomat Ralph Bunche was born in Detroit, Michigan. He was the first African American to be honored with the Nobel Peace Prize  in 1950.
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#BlackHistoryofAugust
#BlackHistoryofAugust7
#TodayInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #WeLoveBlackLeadership
#WeLoveBlackScholars - #regrann
😧Never Seen this movie...dramatic 🎶
_________________________________________
 #MichaelClarkeDuncan As a 6-foot-5 African-American man weighing more than 300 pounds, Duncan found himself typecast in the bouncer or "tough guy" role on television—The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, The Jamie Foxx Show, Married... with Children, and The Bold and the Beautiful—and in films, including Warren Beatty's Bulworth and A Night at the Roxbury (both released in 1998). He received acclaim in 1998 for his performance as Bear, a member of the motley crew of astronauts led by Bruce Willis in the action blockbuster Armageddon.

Michael Clarke Duncan was born on December 10, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois. Duncan dropped out of college and worked security jobs for clients, including actors Will Smith and Martin Lawrence. Encouraged by his mother to pursue acting, he made several minor TV and film appearances before landing a role in 1999's The Green Mile, which earned him an Oscar nomination. 
On July 13, 2012, Duncan suffered a heart attack. Thanks to his fiancée and former contestant on The Apprentice, #OmarosaManigaultStallworth, who performed CPR on the actor, #MichaelDuncan survived the attack, but never fully recovered.

Duncan died of heart complications (caused by theattack he had suffered two months prior) on September 3, 2012, at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 54 years old.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember10 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#BlackHistoryofSeptember3
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackActors - #regrann
😧Never Seen this movie...dramatic 🎶 _________________________________________ #MichaelClarkeDuncan  As a 6-foot-5 African-American man weighing more than 300 pounds, Duncan found himself typecast in the bouncer or "tough guy" role on television—The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, The Jamie Foxx Show, Married... with Children, and The Bold and the Beautiful—and in films, including Warren Beatty's Bulworth and A Night at the Roxbury (both released in 1998). He received acclaim in 1998 for his performance as Bear, a member of the motley crew of astronauts led by Bruce Willis in the action blockbuster Armageddon. Michael Clarke Duncan was born on December 10, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois. Duncan dropped out of college and worked security jobs for clients, including actors Will Smith and Martin Lawrence. Encouraged by his mother to pursue acting, he made several minor TV and film appearances before landing a role in 1999's The Green Mile, which earned him an Oscar nomination. On July 13, 2012, Duncan suffered a heart attack. Thanks to his fiancée and former contestant on The Apprentice, #OmarosaManigaultStallworth , who performed CPR on the actor, #MichaelDuncan  survived the attack, but never fully recovered. Duncan died of heart complications (caused by theattack he had suffered two months prior) on September 3, 2012, at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 54 years old. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember10  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofSeptember3  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackActors  - #regrann 
The Story of L.C. Huggins!
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#LCSpeedyHuggins was born in 1913 in Fort Smith, Arkansas. A self-taught tap dancer, when he graduated from the eigth grade in 1928 he was dancing in night clubs throughout the 18th and Vine district. In 1933, he performed on the opening night of the Cherry Blossom Club, one of the areas premier nightclubs.

His booking agent gave him the nickname “Speedy” for his slow, soft-shoe dance style and his relaxed pace. While the multi-talented dancer, drummer and singer never gained national fame, as did contemporaries Count Basie and Charlie Parker, Speedy Huggins was one of the most beloved musicians in Kansas City. Prior to his death at the age of 85 in 1999, he was a living legend, as well as a cherished Kansas City icon. He was one of the few jazzmen still working whose musical roots reached back to the heyday of Kansas City Jazz, when the 18th and Vine district boasted one of the liveliest music and nightclub scenes in the country.

#SpeedyHuggins performed throughout Europe while serving in the Army during World War II. After the war, he returned to Kansas City and enrolled in the Conservatory of Music at the University of Missouri – Kansas City in drum and percussion classes. An extensive period of touring then followed for Huggins. He danced primarily with the Three Clouds of Rhythm and played drums with other bands, including the Willie Rice Big Band. 
Huggins remained active in music until the end of his life. In the 1980’s, he added singing to his repertoire of talents and played with Speedy Huggins and His Legends of Jazz and with The Scamps. An inveterate nighthawk – he was known as Kansas City’s “King of Nightlife” over the years – Huggins performed at virtually every local night club and jazz event, and at the innumerable jam sessions with practically every jazz and blues musician in Kansas City.
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveJazzLegends
#WeLoveBlackMusicians
The Story of L.C. Huggins! #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #LCSpeedyHuggins  was born in 1913 in Fort Smith, Arkansas. A self-taught tap dancer, when he graduated from the eigth grade in 1928 he was dancing in night clubs throughout the 18th and Vine district. In 1933, he performed on the opening night of the Cherry Blossom Club, one of the areas premier nightclubs. His booking agent gave him the nickname “Speedy” for his slow, soft-shoe dance style and his relaxed pace. While the multi-talented dancer, drummer and singer never gained national fame, as did contemporaries Count Basie and Charlie Parker, Speedy Huggins was one of the most beloved musicians in Kansas City. Prior to his death at the age of 85 in 1999, he was a living legend, as well as a cherished Kansas City icon. He was one of the few jazzmen still working whose musical roots reached back to the heyday of Kansas City Jazz, when the 18th and Vine district boasted one of the liveliest music and nightclub scenes in the country. #SpeedyHuggins  performed throughout Europe while serving in the Army during World War II. After the war, he returned to Kansas City and enrolled in the Conservatory of Music at the University of Missouri – Kansas City in drum and percussion classes. An extensive period of touring then followed for Huggins. He danced primarily with the Three Clouds of Rhythm and played drums with other bands, including the Willie Rice Big Band. Huggins remained active in music until the end of his life. In the 1980’s, he added singing to his repertoire of talents and played with Speedy Huggins and His Legends of Jazz and with The Scamps. An inveterate nighthawk – he was known as Kansas City’s “King of Nightlife” over the years – Huggins performed at virtually every local night club and jazz event, and at the innumerable jam sessions with practically every jazz and blues musician in Kansas City. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveJazzLegends  #WeLoveBlackMusicians 
Little known Profound Black Leader!
#HenryProctor was a 19th early & 20th Century Century African American author, minister and lecturer.
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#HenryHughProctor became pastor of the First Congregational Church in Atlanta, the second oldest Black Congregational church in the United States. In 1903, Proctor joined George Washington Henderson, president of Straight University, a Historically Black College in New Orleans, to found the National Convention of Congregational Workers Among Colored People, and Proctor became its first president. In 1904, Clark University awarded Proctor a Doctor of Divinity degree.

After the Atlanta Race Riot in 1906, Proctor and a white attorney worked together to quell remaining tensions and formed the Interracial Committee of Atlanta. In the church, Proctor provided amenities lacking to Blacks such as a library, a kindergarten, an employment bureau, a gymnasium, a ladies’ reading parlor, a music room, counseling services and a model kitchen and sewing room for girls. He also helped open the first housing facility for young employed Black women. Proctor was a strong believer in self-improvement. Proctor also founded the Atlanta Colored Music Festival Association, with concerts attended by both races, segregated but under one roof, believing that music could quell racial animosity. This festival continues to the present day as the Atlanta Music Festival. #HenryHProctor died unexpectedly on May 12, 1933, and was buried in Atlanta.
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofMay12
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
Little known Profound Black Leader! #HenryProctor  was a 19th early & 20th Century Century African American author, minister and lecturer. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #HenryHughProctor  became pastor of the First Congregational Church in Atlanta, the second oldest Black Congregational church in the United States. In 1903, Proctor joined George Washington Henderson, president of Straight University, a Historically Black College in New Orleans, to found the National Convention of Congregational Workers Among Colored People, and Proctor became its first president. In 1904, Clark University awarded Proctor a Doctor of Divinity degree. After the Atlanta Race Riot in 1906, Proctor and a white attorney worked together to quell remaining tensions and formed the Interracial Committee of Atlanta. In the church, Proctor provided amenities lacking to Blacks such as a library, a kindergarten, an employment bureau, a gymnasium, a ladies’ reading parlor, a music room, counseling services and a model kitchen and sewing room for girls. He also helped open the first housing facility for young employed Black women. Proctor was a strong believer in self-improvement. Proctor also founded the Atlanta Colored Music Festival Association, with concerts attended by both races, segregated but under one roof, believing that music could quell racial animosity. This festival continues to the present day as the Atlanta Music Festival. #HenryHProctor  died unexpectedly on May 12, 1933, and was buried in Atlanta. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofMay12  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackLeadership 
"Lethal like venomous snake bites the marijuana makes my eyes bright red like brake lights." -Germaine Williams 
#GermaineWilliams a.k.a. #Canibus (aka Can-I-Bus) was born in 1974 in Jamaica to Basil and Elaine Williams. Growing up, Canibus found interest in beat boxing and break dancing. After his parents divorced, Canibus and his mother immigrated to the U.S. before his teen years and moved around frequently due to his mother's work.

Before he was eighteen he had lived in Brooklyn, Washington D.C., Miami, England (where his mother was originally from), Atlanta, Georgia, and eventually New Jersey. Though Canibus dabbled with several jobs and interests, his main pursuit in life was rapping. During his days as a kid in the Bronx, Bis (another alias) evolved through various elements of Hip Hop and eventually began making his mark in the New York City rap scene. Canibus' biggest claim to fame arose when LL Cool J invited him to do a guest spot on LL's new single "3, 2, 1". During the recording session Canibus began admiring a tattoo of a microphone on LL's arm. He asked if Mr. Smith would mind if he got a mike tatted on his arm. LL joked about it, saying that Canibus should only get a mike tattoo if he truly felt he was worthy. When Canibus stepped into the booth to record his verse for the song he included a few lines before he began to rap, shouting out each of the other artists in the song; when he reach LL he shouted out, "LL, is that a mike on your arm? Let me borrow that!" LL took that as a diss although Canibus insisted that the line was meant as a compliment, LL went in the booth and recorded an entire verse directed at Canibus without actually naming him. Canibus has stated that LL asked him to remove the line about the microphone and Canibus did so, believing LL would remove the attack on Canibus but LL did not do that. Eventually the original version of the song, with Canibus' line about the microphone, leaked and so it was revealed that Canibus was the one LL was attacking in his verse.  #TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
"Lethal like venomous snake bites the marijuana makes my eyes bright red like brake lights." -Germaine Williams #GermaineWilliams  a.k.a. #Canibus  (aka Can-I-Bus) was born in 1974 in Jamaica to Basil and Elaine Williams. Growing up, Canibus found interest in beat boxing and break dancing. After his parents divorced, Canibus and his mother immigrated to the U.S. before his teen years and moved around frequently due to his mother's work. Before he was eighteen he had lived in Brooklyn, Washington D.C., Miami, England (where his mother was originally from), Atlanta, Georgia, and eventually New Jersey. Though Canibus dabbled with several jobs and interests, his main pursuit in life was rapping. During his days as a kid in the Bronx, Bis (another alias) evolved through various elements of Hip Hop and eventually began making his mark in the New York City rap scene. Canibus' biggest claim to fame arose when LL Cool J invited him to do a guest spot on LL's new single "3, 2, 1". During the recording session Canibus began admiring a tattoo of a microphone on LL's arm. He asked if Mr. Smith would mind if he got a mike tatted on his arm. LL joked about it, saying that Canibus should only get a mike tattoo if he truly felt he was worthy. When Canibus stepped into the booth to record his verse for the song he included a few lines before he began to rap, shouting out each of the other artists in the song; when he reach LL he shouted out, "LL, is that a mike on your arm? Let me borrow that!" LL took that as a diss although Canibus insisted that the line was meant as a compliment, LL went in the booth and recorded an entire verse directed at Canibus without actually naming him. Canibus has stated that LL asked him to remove the line about the microphone and Canibus did so, believing LL would remove the attack on Canibus but LL did not do that. Eventually the original version of the song, with Canibus' line about the microphone, leaked and so it was revealed that Canibus was the one LL was attacking in his verse. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
"A wise man sees failure as progress.
A fool divorces his knowledge and misses the logic, And loses his soul in the process." _______________________________________________
#Germaine Williams aka Canibus enlisted in the Army in 2002 and served in Iraq. His most critically acclaimed album, 2003's "Rip the Jacker," was released from prerecorded material. After his discharge in 2004, he went on to record many more albums, and has amassed a considerable cult following. His most recent album, "Time Flys, Life Dies, Phoenix Rise" was released in 2015.

Before he was eighteen he had lived in Brooklyn, Washington D.C., Miami, England (where his mother was originally from), Atlanta, Georgia, and eventually New Jersey. Though Canibus dabbled with several jobs and interests, his main pursuit in life was rapping. During his days as a kid in the Bronx, Bis (another alias) evolved through various elements of Hip Hop and eventually began making his mark in the New York City rap scene. Canibus' biggest claim to fame arose when LL Cool J invited him to do a guest spot on LL's new single "3, 2, 1". During the recording session Canibus began admiring a tattoo of a microphone on LL's arm. He asked if Mr. Smith would mind if he got a mike tatted on his arm. LL joked about it, saying that Canibus should only get a mike tattoo if he truly felt he was worthy. When Canibus stepped into the booth to record his verse for the song he included a few lines before he began to rap, shouting out each of the other artists in the song; when he reach LL he shouted out, "LL, is that a mike on your arm? Let me borrow that!" LL took that as a diss although Canibus insisted that the line was meant as a compliment, LL went in the booth and recorded an entire verse directed at Canibus without actually naming him.
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory -
"A wise man sees failure as progress. A fool divorces his knowledge and misses the logic, And loses his soul in the process." _______________________________________________ #Germaine  Williams aka Canibus enlisted in the Army in 2002 and served in Iraq. His most critically acclaimed album, 2003's "Rip the Jacker," was released from prerecorded material. After his discharge in 2004, he went on to record many more albums, and has amassed a considerable cult following. His most recent album, "Time Flys, Life Dies, Phoenix Rise" was released in 2015. Before he was eighteen he had lived in Brooklyn, Washington D.C., Miami, England (where his mother was originally from), Atlanta, Georgia, and eventually New Jersey. Though Canibus dabbled with several jobs and interests, his main pursuit in life was rapping. During his days as a kid in the Bronx, Bis (another alias) evolved through various elements of Hip Hop and eventually began making his mark in the New York City rap scene. Canibus' biggest claim to fame arose when LL Cool J invited him to do a guest spot on LL's new single "3, 2, 1". During the recording session Canibus began admiring a tattoo of a microphone on LL's arm. He asked if Mr. Smith would mind if he got a mike tatted on his arm. LL joked about it, saying that Canibus should only get a mike tattoo if he truly felt he was worthy. When Canibus stepped into the booth to record his verse for the song he included a few lines before he began to rap, shouting out each of the other artists in the song; when he reach LL he shouted out, "LL, is that a mike on your arm? Let me borrow that!" LL took that as a diss although Canibus insisted that the line was meant as a compliment, LL went in the booth and recorded an entire verse directed at Canibus without actually naming him. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  -
Damn Gurl😭😭😭
Happy Belated @chrisettemichele you'll always be my Fav😍😍😍
#ChrisetteMichele is a New York native who has been on the music scene since 2007. The illustrious singer/songwriter/pianist graduated with a vocal performance degree from Five Towns Colleg in Dix Hills, New York. A well-respected vocalist who has a few albums to her credit since her debut in 2007. She has been featured on singles with notables like Nas, Jay-Z, and the roots. Chrisette has charted Billboard with a number of hits, but here are some of her most underrated songs to date.
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistory365
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackSoulDivas
Damn Gurl😭😭😭 Happy Belated @chrisettemichele you'll always be my Fav😍😍😍 #ChrisetteMichele  is a New York native who has been on the music scene since 2007. The illustrious singer/songwriter/pianist graduated with a vocal performance degree from Five Towns Colleg in Dix Hills, New York. A well-respected vocalist who has a few albums to her credit since her debut in 2007. She has been featured on singles with notables like Nas, Jay-Z, and the roots. Chrisette has charted Billboard with a number of hits, but here are some of her most underrated songs to date. #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistory365  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackSoulDivas 
RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. 
#OssieDavis and his wife and acting partner, #RubyDee, helped to open doors and widen horizons for Black people on stage and screen. They fought zealously for Human Rights from Washington to Hollywood.

When the couple was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004, Mr. Davis stated: "We knew that every time we got a job and every time we were onstage, America was looking to make judgments about all Black folks on the basis of how you looked, how you sounded, how you carried yourself. So any role you had was a role that was involved in the struggle for Black identification. You couldn't escape it....
"On December 9, 1948, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee took the day off from rehearsals for the play, "The Smile of the World. They rode a bus to Jersey City to be married by the Rev. Dr. William A. Epps, Sr.

The 56 year marriage was one of mutual respect and dignity. They shared a passion for equality, social responsibility and justice, and are considered American treasures.” #BlackHistory #BlackExcellence
#BlackLove #TodayInBlackHistory
RP: Black Culture: “Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee Married December 9, 1948. #OssieDavis  and his wife and acting partner, #RubyDee , helped to open doors and widen horizons for Black people on stage and screen. They fought zealously for Human Rights from Washington to Hollywood. When the couple was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004, Mr. Davis stated: "We knew that every time we got a job and every time we were onstage, America was looking to make judgments about all Black folks on the basis of how you looked, how you sounded, how you carried yourself. So any role you had was a role that was involved in the struggle for Black identification. You couldn't escape it.... "On December 9, 1948, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee took the day off from rehearsals for the play, "The Smile of the World. They rode a bus to Jersey City to be married by the Rev. Dr. William A. Epps, Sr. The 56 year marriage was one of mutual respect and dignity. They shared a passion for equality, social responsibility and justice, and are considered American treasures.” #BlackHistory  #BlackExcellence  #BlackLove  #TodayInBlackHistory 
@Regran_ed from @heru_behutet -  LaWanda Page and Redd Foxx's History
#WeLoveBlackComedians
When #ReddFoxx was offered a sitcom in Los Angeles, he brought his childhood friend #LaWandaPage to the attention to one of the show's producers, who was already familiar with Page and her act. Foxx subsequently asked Page to read for the role of Aunt Esther; she auditioned and was offered the role.

LAWANDA PAGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FIRED IF IT WASN'T FOR FOXX.
LaWanda Page was the only actress Foxx wanted to play Fred's sister-in-law, Esther. Page was too nervous to give an audition producers liked, but Foxx insisted. "They were going to let me go," Page told Jet magazine in 1977, "but Redd said, 'No, you ain't gonna let her go. That's LaWanda and I know she can do it! Just give me some time with her.'" #TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember -
#BlackHistoryofDecember9
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofOctober11 - #regrann
@Regran_ed from @heru_behutet - LaWanda Page and Redd Foxx's History #WeLoveBlackComedians  When #ReddFoxx  was offered a sitcom in Los Angeles, he brought his childhood friend #LaWandaPage  to the attention to one of the show's producers, who was already familiar with Page and her act. Foxx subsequently asked Page to read for the role of Aunt Esther; she auditioned and was offered the role. LAWANDA PAGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FIRED IF IT WASN'T FOR FOXX. LaWanda Page was the only actress Foxx wanted to play Fred's sister-in-law, Esther. Page was too nervous to give an audition producers liked, but Foxx insisted. "They were going to let me go," Page told Jet magazine in 1977, "but Redd said, 'No, you ain't gonna let her go. That's LaWanda and I know she can do it! Just give me some time with her.'" #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember  - #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofOctober11  - #regrann 
#RakimAllen debuted in 2014 with the mixtape RNB (Real Nigga Bangaz), its title referencing Rock's blend of R&B and rap. The RNB2 mixtape appeared early in 2015 and caught the attention of Atlantic Records. The Warner-affiliated label signed Rock and released RNB3 that same year, along with his single "Jealous" featuring Fetty Wap. The two released a mixtape, Money, Hoes & Flows, in 2016. Throughout the year, Rock made a multitude of guest appearances on tracks by Kodak Black, YFN Lucci, Kevin Hart, and others. GTTM: Goin Thru the Motions, was released by Atlantic in early 2017; originally referred to as Rock's first proper album, it was later considered a mixtape. Wiz Khalifa, Ty Dolla $ign, and A Boogie wit da Hoodie all made guest appearances. The release was a success, hitting the Top 30 of the Billboard 200 album chart. That summer, he was named as one of XXL's 2017 Freshman Class before issuing the single "Time." Catch These Vibes, Rock's actual debut studio full-length, appeared in November 17, and hit the Top 20 of the Billboard 200. ~ David Jeffries, Rovi
Rakim Allen (born December 9, 1991), better known by his stage name PnB Rock, is an American hip hop recording artist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends
#RakimAllen  debuted in 2014 with the mixtape RNB (Real Nigga Bangaz), its title referencing Rock's blend of R&B and rap. The RNB2 mixtape appeared early in 2015 and caught the attention of Atlantic Records. The Warner-affiliated label signed Rock and released RNB3 that same year, along with his single "Jealous" featuring Fetty Wap. The two released a mixtape, Money, Hoes & Flows, in 2016. Throughout the year, Rock made a multitude of guest appearances on tracks by Kodak Black, YFN Lucci, Kevin Hart, and others. GTTM: Goin Thru the Motions, was released by Atlantic in early 2017; originally referred to as Rock's first proper album, it was later considered a mixtape. Wiz Khalifa, Ty Dolla $ign, and A Boogie wit da Hoodie all made guest appearances. The release was a success, hitting the Top 30 of the Billboard 200 album chart. That summer, he was named as one of XXL's 2017 Freshman Class before issuing the single "Time." Catch These Vibes, Rock's actual debut studio full-length, appeared in November 17, and hit the Top 20 of the Billboard 200. ~ David Jeffries, Rovi Rakim Allen (born December 9, 1991), better known by his stage name PnB Rock, is an American hip hop recording artist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends 
@Regran_ed from @heru_behutet - (Used to see dude in my barbershop #PhillyCuts 👌#19144 👑)
He debuted in 2014 with the mixtape RNB (Real Nigga Bangaz), its title referencing Rock's blend of R&B and rap. The RNB2 mixtape appeared early in 2015 and caught the attention of Atlantic Records. The Warner-affiliated label signed Rock and released RNB3 that same year, along with his single "Jealous" featuring Fetty Wap. The two released a mixtape, Money, Hoes & Flows, in 2016. Throughout the year, Rock made a multitude of guest appearances on tracks by Kodak Black, YFN Lucci, Kevin Hart, and others. GTTM: Goin Thru the Motions, was released by Atlantic in early 2017; originally referred to as Rock's first proper album, it was later considered a mixtape. Wiz Khalifa, Ty Dolla $ign, and A Boogie wit da Hoodie all made guest appearances. The release was a success, hitting the Top 30 of the Billboard 200 album chart. That summer, he was named as one of XXL's 2017 Freshman Class before issuing the single "Time." Catch These Vibes, Rock's actual debut studio full-length, appeared in November 17, and hit the Top 20 of the Billboard 200. ~ David Jeffries, Rovi
Rakim Allen (born December 9, 1991), better known by his stage name PnB Rock, is an American hip hop recording artist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory - #regrann
@Regran_ed from @heru_behutet - (Used to see dude in my barbershop #PhillyCuts  👌#19144  👑) He debuted in 2014 with the mixtape RNB (Real Nigga Bangaz), its title referencing Rock's blend of R&B and rap. The RNB2 mixtape appeared early in 2015 and caught the attention of Atlantic Records. The Warner-affiliated label signed Rock and released RNB3 that same year, along with his single "Jealous" featuring Fetty Wap. The two released a mixtape, Money, Hoes & Flows, in 2016. Throughout the year, Rock made a multitude of guest appearances on tracks by Kodak Black, YFN Lucci, Kevin Hart, and others. GTTM: Goin Thru the Motions, was released by Atlantic in early 2017; originally referred to as Rock's first proper album, it was later considered a mixtape. Wiz Khalifa, Ty Dolla $ign, and A Boogie wit da Hoodie all made guest appearances. The release was a success, hitting the Top 30 of the Billboard 200 album chart. That summer, he was named as one of XXL's 2017 Freshman Class before issuing the single "Time." Catch These Vibes, Rock's actual debut studio full-length, appeared in November 17, and hit the Top 20 of the Billboard 200. ~ David Jeffries, Rovi Rakim Allen (born December 9, 1991), better known by his stage name PnB Rock, is an American hip hop recording artist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackHipHopLegends  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  - #regrann 
Remembering Donald Byrd!

Donaldson Toussaint L'Ouverture Byrd II was an American jazz and rhythm & blues trumpeter.
 his hard bop output.

#DonaldByrd II was born in Detroit, Michigan, on December 9, 1932. His father, a Methodist minister, was an amateur musician, and Byrd was already an accomplished trumpeter by the time he finished high school, having performed with Lionel Hampton. Byrd served a stint in the Air Force, during which time he played in a military band, and subsequently completed his bachelor's degree in music at Wayne State University in 1954 (December 9, 1932 – February 4, 2013)

#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#BlackHistoryofFebruary4
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday
#WeLoveJazzLegends
#WeLoveBlackMusicians -
Remembering Donald Byrd! Donaldson Toussaint L'Ouverture Byrd II was an American jazz and rhythm & blues trumpeter.  his hard bop output. #DonaldByrd  II was born in Detroit, Michigan, on December 9, 1932. His father, a Methodist minister, was an amateur musician, and Byrd was already an accomplished trumpeter by the time he finished high school, having performed with Lionel Hampton. Byrd served a stint in the Air Force, during which time he played in a military band, and subsequently completed his bachelor's degree in music at Wayne State University in 1954 (December 9, 1932 – February 4, 2013) #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofFebruary4  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday  #WeLoveJazzLegends  #WeLoveBlackMusicians  -
All Profound Black Men Today!
The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society was founded on this date in 1833. This was an abolitionist group that also championed racial and sexual equity.

On this date in 1890 #JohnPParker, African American businessman, and abolitionist patented the Soil Pulverizer.

LC #SpeedyHuggins, an African American dancer and musician, was born on this date in 1913.

The birth of #DonaldHollowell on this date in 1917 is marked. He was an African American attorney who specialized in Civil Rights.

#RoyDeCarava was born on this date in 1919. He was an African American artist and photographer.

#ReddFoxx was born on this date in 1922. He was an African American comedian and actor.

#DonaldByrd was born on this date in 1932. He was an African American musician and music educator.

#DeaconJones was born on this date in 1938. He was an African American football player, part time actor and philanthropist.

#GermaineWilliams stage name #Canibus world renown battle rapper was born on this date 1974.
#BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear
#BlackHistoryofDecember9
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember
#TodayInBlackHistory
All Profound Black Men Today! The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society was founded on this date in 1833. This was an abolitionist group that also championed racial and sexual equity. On this date in 1890 #JohnPParker , African American businessman, and abolitionist patented the Soil Pulverizer. LC #SpeedyHuggins , an African American dancer and musician, was born on this date in 1913. The birth of #DonaldHollowell  on this date in 1917 is marked. He was an African American attorney who specialized in Civil Rights. #RoyDeCarava  was born on this date in 1919. He was an African American artist and photographer. #ReddFoxx  was born on this date in 1922. He was an African American comedian and actor. #DonaldByrd  was born on this date in 1932. He was an African American musician and music educator. #DeaconJones  was born on this date in 1938. He was an African American football player, part time actor and philanthropist. #GermaineWilliams  stage name #Canibus  world renown battle rapper was born on this date 1974. #BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember  #TodayInBlackHistory 
One of the Greatest Photographers of the 20th Century! 🏆
#WeLoveBlackArtist 🎥
Mid 20th Century Harlem on 🎥 
#RoyDeCarava, in full Roy Rudolph DeCarava (Dec. 9, 1919 - Oct. 27, 2009), American photographerwhose images of African Americans chronicle subjects such as daily life in Harlem, the civil rights movement, and jazz musicians
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember9
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#BlackHistoryofOctober27
#MfalmeHatariMaarifaVideo
#WeLoveBlackPhotographers - #regrann
One of the Greatest Photographers of the 20th Century! 🏆 #WeLoveBlackArtist  🎥 Mid 20th Century Harlem on 🎥 #RoyDeCarava , in full Roy Rudolph DeCarava (Dec. 9, 1919 - Oct. 27, 2009), American photographerwhose images of African Americans chronicle subjects such as daily life in Harlem, the civil rights movement, and jazz musicians #BlackHistoryofDecember  #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember9  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #BlackHistoryofOctober27  #MfalmeHatariMaarifaVideo  #WeLoveBlackPhotographers  - #regrann 
“I went from someone being revered and loved to facing putting out an album in the worst climate of my musical career” - Chrisette Michele ________________________________________________

#ChrisetteMichele faced severe backlash after choosing to perform at one Trump’s inaugural balls in January despite many black artists declining the offer. She reasoned that she was “willing to be a bridge” following the tumultuous 2016 presidential campaign season.

In her posts, the singer opened up that she battled with depression and suicidal thoughts following the backlash. Then she had a miscarriage: “Something came out of me. It was my child. The one my love and I worked so hard on,” she wrote in another Instagram post that included a graphic image of the miscarriage. “I never knew I could allow myself to be so broken that my physical body would break down. Just because I had a negative experience didn’t mean I had to become negative and broken. When I lost my child I knew that it was time for me to become a #StrongBlackWoman.”
#WeLoveJazzLegends
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistory365
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackSoulDivas
“I went from someone being revered and loved to facing putting out an album in the worst climate of my musical career” - Chrisette Michele ________________________________________________ #ChrisetteMichele  faced severe backlash after choosing to perform at one Trump’s inaugural balls in January despite many black artists declining the offer. She reasoned that she was “willing to be a bridge” following the tumultuous 2016 presidential campaign season. In her posts, the singer opened up that she battled with depression and suicidal thoughts following the backlash. Then she had a miscarriage: “Something came out of me. It was my child. The one my love and I worked so hard on,” she wrote in another Instagram post that included a graphic image of the miscarriage. “I never knew I could allow myself to be so broken that my physical body would break down. Just because I had a negative experience didn’t mean I had to become negative and broken. When I lost my child I knew that it was time for me to become a #StrongBlackWoman .” #WeLoveJazzLegends  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistory365  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackSoulDivas 
“I went from someone being revered and loved to facing putting out an album in the worst climate of my musical career,”
_________________________________________________
 #ChrisetteMichele is a New York native who has been on the music scene since 2007. The illustrious singer/songwriter/pianist graduated with a vocal performance degree from Five Towns Colleg in Dix Hills, New York. A well-respected vocalist who has a few albums to her credit since her debut in 2007. She has been featured on singles with notables like Nas, Jay-Z, and the roots. Chrisette has charted Billboard with a number of hits, but here are some of her most underrated songs to date.
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistory365
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackSoulDivas
“I went from someone being revered and loved to facing putting out an album in the worst climate of my musical career,” _________________________________________________ #ChrisetteMichele  is a New York native who has been on the music scene since 2007. The illustrious singer/songwriter/pianist graduated with a vocal performance degree from Five Towns Colleg in Dix Hills, New York. A well-respected vocalist who has a few albums to her credit since her debut in 2007. She has been featured on singles with notables like Nas, Jay-Z, and the roots. Chrisette has charted Billboard with a number of hits, but here are some of her most underrated songs to date. #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistory365  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackSoulDivas 
"A Couple of Forevers".
#ChrisetteMichelle
 This particular song is off of her 2013 release entitled "Better". Chrisette notes that the period before the album was a time of personal development and strengthening her self-image. The song is worthy of being put on potential couples' wedding reception playlist. It gives hope to those looking for love and encourages those who are still searching that special someone. Chrisette's voice remains to be a cut above the rest as she pours out herself on the track. The song did receive some national attention, garnering a spot on Billboard plus radio airplay.

A multi-talented artist that has a bright future ahead of her. Chrisette Michele continues to be an underrated vocalist in the music industry, yet is well-respected among vocalist throughout the Tri-State area.
#WeLoveBlackSoulDivas
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistory365
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackSoulDivas
"A Couple of Forevers". #ChrisetteMichelle  This particular song is off of her 2013 release entitled "Better". Chrisette notes that the period before the album was a time of personal development and strengthening her self-image. The song is worthy of being put on potential couples' wedding reception playlist. It gives hope to those looking for love and encourages those who are still searching that special someone. Chrisette's voice remains to be a cut above the rest as she pours out herself on the track. The song did receive some national attention, garnering a spot on Billboard plus radio airplay. A multi-talented artist that has a bright future ahead of her. Chrisette Michele continues to be an underrated vocalist in the music industry, yet is well-respected among vocalist throughout the Tri-State area. #WeLoveBlackSoulDivas  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistory365  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackSoulDivas 
Sarah Williamson was a little known African American teacher, administrator, and missionary
#WeLoveBlackActivist
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
#SarahWilliamson sailed for Liberia in 1924. She was stationed at the Suehn Industrial Academy, becoming its third principal. Early in her missionary experience, Williamson was very discouraged to find that her translators were not interpreting her religious messages correctly.

She then decided to work with children, believing they could learn English more easily than their parents and they could teach her their language. She taught them to read and hoped that in return they would teach their parents to read the Bible.

Williamson was married and widowed twice. She returned to America in 1932. During her eight years in Africa, Williamson traveled extensively campaigning for money for her mission work. In 1954, she returned to Africa at the same school as its Dean of Girls, working there until 1957. Sarah Williamson died in Washington D.C. in 1986.
#WeLoveBlackEducators
#BlackHistoryofNovember29
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofDecember
Sarah Williamson was a little known African American teacher, administrator, and missionary #WeLoveBlackActivist  #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  #SarahWilliamson  sailed for Liberia in 1924. She was stationed at the Suehn Industrial Academy, becoming its third principal. Early in her missionary experience, Williamson was very discouraged to find that her translators were not interpreting her religious messages correctly. She then decided to work with children, believing they could learn English more easily than their parents and they could teach her their language. She taught them to read and hoped that in return they would teach their parents to read the Bible. Williamson was married and widowed twice. She returned to America in 1932. During her eight years in Africa, Williamson traveled extensively campaigning for money for her mission work. In 1954, she returned to Africa at the same school as its Dean of Girls, working there until 1957. Sarah Williamson died in Washington D.C. in 1986. #WeLoveBlackEducators  #BlackHistoryofNovember29  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
On December 8, 1969, in Los Angeles police raided the Black Panther headquarters, in L.A., four days after police assassinated Black Panthers Fred Hampton and Mark Clark in Chicago.
#BlackHistoryYouShouldKnow
During the battle, the Panthers withstood the police attacks, including a bomb dropped on the roof of the building. Frustrated, the police arrested Elmer Geronimo Pratt, the Panther's Deputy Minister of Defense, on a fabricated robbery and murder charge that was later dismissed. In Chicago, they were able to shoot Hampton through a wall because they had a detailed map of the apartment provided by an FBI agent who had also made sure Hampton would be on the other side of that wall by drugging his food the night before.

Pratt, a decorated Vietnam vet, had used his military training to successfully fortify the building. The 11 Los Angeles Panthers inside the office kept up their resistance for five hours on that December night! On June 10, 1997, after 27 years in prison, many of them under severe hardship in solitary confinement, Elmer Geronimo Pratt’s conviction was overturned and he was released.

The then 49-year-old former paratrooper was greeted by hundreds of well-wishers with words of peace, not bitterness.
#TodayInWhiteTerrorism
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofNovember
On December 8, 1969, in Los Angeles police raided the Black Panther headquarters, in L.A., four days after police assassinated Black Panthers Fred Hampton and Mark Clark in Chicago. #BlackHistoryYouShouldKnow  During the battle, the Panthers withstood the police attacks, including a bomb dropped on the roof of the building. Frustrated, the police arrested Elmer Geronimo Pratt, the Panther's Deputy Minister of Defense, on a fabricated robbery and murder charge that was later dismissed. In Chicago, they were able to shoot Hampton through a wall because they had a detailed map of the apartment provided by an FBI agent who had also made sure Hampton would be on the other side of that wall by drugging his food the night before. Pratt, a decorated Vietnam vet, had used his military training to successfully fortify the building. The 11 Los Angeles Panthers inside the office kept up their resistance for five hours on that December night! On June 10, 1997, after 27 years in prison, many of them under severe hardship in solitary confinement, Elmer Geronimo Pratt’s conviction was overturned and he was released. The then 49-year-old former paratrooper was greeted by hundreds of well-wishers with words of peace, not bitterness. #TodayInWhiteTerrorism  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofNovember 
Hank Thompson, an early 20th Century African American baseball player.

On July 4 of that year the New York Giants called him and Monte Irvin up from the Giants’ Jersey City farm club. Thompson received $2,500 over the league minimum of $5,000. By signing with the Giants, Thompson earned a unique place in baseball, as the first Black to play in the National and American leagues. He also appeared with Indian Larry Doby in an August 9 doubleheader, making it the first time Black players of opposing teams appear on the field at the same time. Another first occurred when Thompson batted against Dodger Don Newcombe. It was the first time in Major League history that a Black pitcher faced a Black batter.

In the 1951 World Series, he was forced to play right field in place of injured Don Mueller, with Willie Mays and Irvin, creating the first all-Black outfield in Major League history. Thompson spent the next eight seasons with the Giants, compiling a lifetime batting average of .267. In 1957, his contract was sold to the Minnesota Twins of the American Association, where he finished his career.

Thompson played in two World Series, 1951 and 1954, hitting .364 in the latter Series against the Cleveland Indians. Hank Thompson died on September 30, 1969 in Fresno, California.
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#BlackHistoryofSeptember30
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#WeLoveBlackAthletes
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofDecember
Hank Thompson, an early 20th Century African American baseball player. On July 4 of that year the New York Giants called him and Monte Irvin up from the Giants’ Jersey City farm club. Thompson received $2,500 over the league minimum of $5,000. By signing with the Giants, Thompson earned a unique place in baseball, as the first Black to play in the National and American leagues. He also appeared with Indian Larry Doby in an August 9 doubleheader, making it the first time Black players of opposing teams appear on the field at the same time. Another first occurred when Thompson batted against Dodger Don Newcombe. It was the first time in Major League history that a Black pitcher faced a Black batter. In the 1951 World Series, he was forced to play right field in place of injured Don Mueller, with Willie Mays and Irvin, creating the first all-Black outfield in Major League history. Thompson spent the next eight seasons with the Giants, compiling a lifetime batting average of .267. In 1957, his contract was sold to the Minnesota Twins of the American Association, where he finished his career. Thompson played in two World Series, 1951 and 1954, hitting .364 in the latter Series against the Cleveland Indians. Hank Thompson died on September 30, 1969 in Fresno, California. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #BlackHistoryofSeptember30  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackAthletes  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
@Regran_ed from @herukhuti_heru_behutet -  Who was Flip Wilson?

#FlipWilson was an award-winning  Comedian,  and actor who hosted his own 1970s variety program, The Flip Wilson Show, which was a major hit. ( December 8, 1933- November 25, 1998)

Born on on December 8, 1933, in Jersey City, New Jersey, #FlipWilson worked across the country as a comedian before garnering fame on programs like The Tonight Show and Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In. His own variety series The Flip Wilson Show launched in 1970 and was a massive, award-winning hit. The show ended in '74, with Wilson opting to stay out of the spotlight. He died in California on November 25, 1998.
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#WeLoveBlackAthletes
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofNovember25
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#WeLoveBlackComedians - #regrann
@Regran_ed from @herukhuti_heru_behutet - Who was Flip Wilson? #FlipWilson  was an award-winning Comedian, and actor who hosted his own 1970s variety program, The Flip Wilson Show, which was a major hit. ( December 8, 1933- November 25, 1998) Born on on December 8, 1933, in Jersey City, New Jersey, #FlipWilson  worked across the country as a comedian before garnering fame on programs like The Tonight Show and Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In. His own variety series The Flip Wilson Show launched in 1970 and was a massive, award-winning hit. The show ended in '74, with Wilson opting to stay out of the spotlight. He died in California on November 25, 1998. #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackAthletes  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofNovember25  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #WeLoveBlackComedians  - #regrann 
"The ultimate mystery is one's own self."
_______________________________________________
You always have two choices: your commitment versus your fear.
_______________________________________________
 Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted. "Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted."
_____________________________________
(I'm not a supporter of everyone I post) #YallGonnaLearnToday-Anyway
Samuel George Davis

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#DayInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofMay16
#WeLoveBlackDance
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
"The ultimate mystery is one's own self." _______________________________________________ You always have two choices: your commitment versus your fear. _______________________________________________ Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted. "Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted." _____________________________________ (I'm not a supporter of everyone I post) #YallGonnaLearnToday -Anyway Samuel George Davis #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #DayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofMay16  #WeLoveBlackDance  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
@Regran_ed from @herukhuti_heru_behutet - "Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted." ____________________________________________
December 8, 1925 – May 16, 1990
#SamuelGeorgeDavisJr
Sammy Davis Jr. was often billed as the "greatest living entertainer in the world". He was born in Harlem, Manhattan, the son of dancer Elvera Davis (née Sanchez ) and vaudeville star Sammy Davis Sr.

#Repost @myskincolorisnotacrime (@get_repost)・・・
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#DayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#WeLoveBlackDance - #regrann
@Regran_ed from @herukhuti_heru_behutet - "Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted." ____________________________________________ December 8, 1925 – May 16, 1990 #SamuelGeorgeDavisJr  Sammy Davis Jr. was often billed as the "greatest living entertainer in the world". He was born in Harlem, Manhattan, the son of dancer Elvera Davis (née Sanchez ) and vaudeville star Sammy Davis Sr. #Repost  @myskincolorisnotacrime (@get_repost)・・・ #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #DayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #WeLoveBlackDance  - #regrann 
Ruth Beckford (born December 7, 1925) is an Oakland dancer and choreographer. She is an alumni of Oakland Tech. 
#WeLoveBlackDance #WeLoveBlackChoreographers
#RuthBeckford was born on December 7, 1925, in Oakland, California, to Cora and Felix Beckford. She began dancing at age three with Florelle Batsford, who taught Beckford ballet, flamenco, hula, baton, toe-tap and acrobatics over the next 15 years.
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
 In 1943, Beckford toured with the legendary Katherine Dunham.. In 1953, Beckford taught at the Katherine Dunham School in New York and opened the Ruth Beckford African-Haitian Dance Company. She helped found the Black Dance Association in 1965, and in 1970 she played a similar role for the Cultural Ethnic Affairs Guild. She also served as a dance panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts. Beckford closed her dance studio in 1975, but still continued to perform. She began acting with the Oakland Ensemble Theatre, where she co-wrote, produced and starred in "'Tis the Morning of My Life," an off-Broadway success. She played major roles in television shows and film, including Angels in the Outfield, The Principal, and Midnight Caller.

Beckford turned her attention toward serving the less fortunate members of society in 1990. She counseled homeless people at the Berkeley office of the Department of Social Services until 1997, when she became a life skills counselor at the Oakland Private Industry Council. In 2000, she became the president of the African American Museum Library Coalition.
#TodayInBlackHistory #ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackActivist #WeLoveBlackEducators
#BlackHistoryofDecember7
#BlackHistoryofDecember
Ruth Beckford (born December 7, 1925) is an Oakland dancer and choreographer. She is an alumni of Oakland Tech. #WeLoveBlackDance  #WeLoveBlackChoreographers  #RuthBeckford  was born on December 7, 1925, in Oakland, California, to Cora and Felix Beckford. She began dancing at age three with Florelle Batsford, who taught Beckford ballet, flamenco, hula, baton, toe-tap and acrobatics over the next 15 years. #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  In 1943, Beckford toured with the legendary Katherine Dunham.. In 1953, Beckford taught at the Katherine Dunham School in New York and opened the Ruth Beckford African-Haitian Dance Company. She helped found the Black Dance Association in 1965, and in 1970 she played a similar role for the Cultural Ethnic Affairs Guild. She also served as a dance panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts. Beckford closed her dance studio in 1975, but still continued to perform. She began acting with the Oakland Ensemble Theatre, where she co-wrote, produced and starred in "'Tis the Morning of My Life," an off-Broadway success. She played major roles in television shows and film, including Angels in the Outfield, The Principal, and Midnight Caller. Beckford turned her attention toward serving the less fortunate members of society in 1990. She counseled homeless people at the Berkeley office of the Department of Social Services until 1997, when she became a life skills counselor at the Oakland Private Industry Council. In 2000, she became the president of the African American Museum Library Coalition. #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackActivist  #WeLoveBlackEducators  #BlackHistoryofDecember7  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
Black Philanthropist, Educator, Musicologist and Opera Singer.
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow ⭐⭐⭐⭐
(December 8, 1903 – July 3, 1994)

#ZelmaWatsonGeorge was the daughter of Samuel and Lena Thomas.  After working as a social worker in Illinois and a Dean at Tennessee State University, she married and moved to Los Angeles where she founded and directed the Avalon Community Center. This marriage ended in divorce and she married for the second time after coming to Cleveland to study African American music. She married attorney Clayborne George in 1944. She had no children

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh #BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofJuly3
 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday
#WeLoveBlackOpera - #regrann
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
Black Philanthropist, Educator, Musicologist and Opera Singer. #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (December 8, 1903 – July 3, 1994) #ZelmaWatsonGeorge  was the daughter of Samuel and Lena Thomas.  After working as a social worker in Illinois and a Dean at Tennessee State University, she married and moved to Los Angeles where she founded and directed the Avalon Community Center. This marriage ended in divorce and she married for the second time after coming to Cleveland to study African American music. She married attorney Clayborne George in 1944. She had no children #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofJuly3  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday  #WeLoveBlackOpera  - #regrann  #LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite 
Remembering Sammy George Davis, Jr 
#SammyDavisJrMovie 🎥
_______________________________________________
You always have two choices: your commitment versus your fear.
_______________________________________________
 Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted. "Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted."
_____________________________________

#SamuelGeorgeDavis, Jr

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember8 #BlackHistoryofDecember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackDance
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers - #regrann
Remembering Sammy George Davis, Jr #SammyDavisJrMovie  🎥 _______________________________________________ You always have two choices: your commitment versus your fear. _______________________________________________ Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted. "Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted." _____________________________________ #SamuelGeorgeDavis , Jr #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackDance  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  - #regrann 
Who was Jimmy Smith?
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow

He was born #JamesOscarSmith aka #JimmySmith in Norristown, PA, near Philadelphia. His mother played the organ in a local church and his father was a tap dancer and a musician. Smith began playing piano for his father’s act at an early age. When he was 14, Smith enlisted in the navy where he played both the piano and the bass in the segregated army band. After a couple of years in the service, Smith moved back to Philadelphia where he worked construction and on the Pennsylvania Railroad to make ends meet.

In 1962, Smith signed with Verve Records and began working with larger ensembles with arranger and composer Oliver Nelson using many of his orchestrations. He also wrote themes for movies such as "Goldfinger" and “The Carpetbaggers" and worked with guitarist Wes Montgomery.

During the 1970s and early ‘80s, Smith opened up a nightclub in Los Angeles with his wife Lola. His career spanned more than 40 years and his musical influence is still felt. His soulful, rhythmic, and thunderous sound on the Hammond B-3 organ created a space for a new generation of jazz organists as well as other instrumentalists.

Smith lived in Sacramento, occasionally doing a concert or a recording session. He died on February 8, 2005.
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#BlackHistoryofFebruary8
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveJazzLegends
#WeLoveBlackMusicians - #regrann
Who was Jimmy Smith? #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  He was born #JamesOscarSmith  aka #JimmySmith  in Norristown, PA, near Philadelphia. His mother played the organ in a local church and his father was a tap dancer and a musician. Smith began playing piano for his father’s act at an early age. When he was 14, Smith enlisted in the navy where he played both the piano and the bass in the segregated army band. After a couple of years in the service, Smith moved back to Philadelphia where he worked construction and on the Pennsylvania Railroad to make ends meet. In 1962, Smith signed with Verve Records and began working with larger ensembles with arranger and composer Oliver Nelson using many of his orchestrations. He also wrote themes for movies such as "Goldfinger" and “The Carpetbaggers" and worked with guitarist Wes Montgomery. During the 1970s and early ‘80s, Smith opened up a nightclub in Los Angeles with his wife Lola. His career spanned more than 40 years and his musical influence is still felt. His soulful, rhythmic, and thunderous sound on the Hammond B-3 organ created a space for a new generation of jazz organists as well as other instrumentalists. Smith lived in Sacramento, occasionally doing a concert or a recording session. He died on February 8, 2005. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #BlackHistoryofFebruary8  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveJazzLegends  #WeLoveBlackMusicians  - #regrann 
#HenryProctor was born on this date in 1868. He was an African American author, minister and lecturer.

#SarahWilliamson was born on this date in 1899. She was an African American teacher, administrator, and missionary.

#ZelmaWatsonGeorge was born on this date in 1903. She was an African American activist, a delegate to the U.N., an opera singer, speaker, and educator.
#HankThompson, an African American baseball player, was born on this date in 1925.

This date marks the birth of #SammyDavisJr,. in 1925. He was an African American impressionist, actor, singer, and dancer.

#JimmySmith, an African American jazz musician, was born this date in 1928.

On this date in 1933, #FlipWilson was born. He was an African American entertainer and the most visible Black comedian of the early 1970s.

On this date in 1969, Los Angeles police raided the Black Panther headquarters, in L.A., four days after police assassinated Black Panthers Fred Hampton and Mark Clark in Chicago.

#BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear
#BlackHistoryofDecember8
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember
#TodayInBlackHistory
#HenryProctor  was born on this date in 1868. He was an African American author, minister and lecturer. #SarahWilliamson  was born on this date in 1899. She was an African American teacher, administrator, and missionary. #ZelmaWatsonGeorge  was born on this date in 1903. She was an African American activist, a delegate to the U.N., an opera singer, speaker, and educator. #HankThompson , an African American baseball player, was born on this date in 1925. This date marks the birth of #SammyDavisJr ,. in 1925. He was an African American impressionist, actor, singer, and dancer. #JimmySmith , an African American jazz musician, was born this date in 1928. On this date in 1933, #FlipWilson  was born. He was an African American entertainer and the most visible Black comedian of the early 1970s. On this date in 1969, Los Angeles police raided the Black Panther headquarters, in L.A., four days after police assassinated Black Panthers Fred Hampton and Mark Clark in Chicago. #BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear  #BlackHistoryofDecember8  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember  #TodayInBlackHistory 
#Todayinblackhistory  we celebrate Kurt Schmoke, in 1987 he became the first African american mayor of Baltimore, Maryland. The social programs he brought about  contributed to the rise in Baltimore’s economic independence, he is now  president of the university of Baltimore 📚📚
#Todayinblackhistory  we celebrate Kurt Schmoke, in 1987 he became the first African american mayor of Baltimore, Maryland. The social programs he brought about contributed to the rise in Baltimore’s economic independence, he is now president of the university of Baltimore 📚📚
Remembering Stand-up Legend 
Patrice Malcolm O'Neal (December 7, 1969 – November 29, 2011) 
#PatriceONeal was born in New York in 1969, but moved to Boston when he was just 1 year old. He was educated at West Roxbury High School and went on to attend Northeastern University, both in Boston. After this, various jobs followed including a sausage cart vendor at a train station, flower seller and popcorn seller at the Boston Garden Arena.

In October 1992, O'Neal attended an open microphone comedy night. He heckled one of the comedians, who challenged O'Neal to perform himself at the next open mic night. He did just that and so began his comedy career. Over the next 6 years, O'Neal became a fixture on the Boston comedy circuit. He then relocated to New York, becoming a regular at Manhattan's Comedy Cellar. After this, O'Neal moved to Los Angeles and radio, television and film projects followed.
#BlackHistoryofNovember29
#BlackHistoryofDecember7
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackComedians
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHisyory365
Remembering Stand-up Legend Patrice Malcolm O'Neal (December 7, 1969 – November 29, 2011) #PatriceONeal  was born in New York in 1969, but moved to Boston when he was just 1 year old. He was educated at West Roxbury High School and went on to attend Northeastern University, both in Boston. After this, various jobs followed including a sausage cart vendor at a train station, flower seller and popcorn seller at the Boston Garden Arena. In October 1992, O'Neal attended an open microphone comedy night. He heckled one of the comedians, who challenged O'Neal to perform himself at the next open mic night. He did just that and so began his comedy career. Over the next 6 years, O'Neal became a fixture on the Boston comedy circuit. He then relocated to New York, becoming a regular at Manhattan's Comedy Cellar. After this, O'Neal moved to Los Angeles and radio, television and film projects followed. #BlackHistoryofNovember29  #BlackHistoryofDecember7  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackComedians  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHisyory365 
The “Father of Black Psychology” because he was the first African American to receive a PhD degree in psychology. 
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#FrancisSumner was born in Arkansas in 1895. As a teenager without a high school education, he was able to pass an entrance exam to Lincoln University and graduate magna cum laude with honors. He later enrolled at Clark University to pursue a bachelor of arts in English in 1916. After graduation he returned to Lincoln as a graduate student and was mentored by Stanley Hall. Although he was approved as a PhD candidate, he could not begin his doctoral dissertation because he was drafted into the army during World War I.

Upon returning from the war, he reenrolled in the doctoral program at Lincoln and in 1920 his dissertation titled "Psychoanalysis of Freud and Adler" was accepted. Sumner became a professor at various universities and managed to publish several articles despite the refusal of research agencies to provide funding for him because of his color.

He was interested in understanding racial bias and supporting educational justice. Sumner is also credited as one of the founders of the psychology department at Howard University, which he chaired from 1928 until his death in 1954.
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
#WeLoveBlackDoctors
#BlackHistoryofJanuary12 👑
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember7
#BlackHistoryofDecember
The “Father of Black Psychology” because he was the first African American to receive a PhD degree in psychology. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #FrancisSumner  was born in Arkansas in 1895. As a teenager without a high school education, he was able to pass an entrance exam to Lincoln University and graduate magna cum laude with honors. He later enrolled at Clark University to pursue a bachelor of arts in English in 1916. After graduation he returned to Lincoln as a graduate student and was mentored by Stanley Hall. Although he was approved as a PhD candidate, he could not begin his doctoral dissertation because he was drafted into the army during World War I. Upon returning from the war, he reenrolled in the doctoral program at Lincoln and in 1920 his dissertation titled "Psychoanalysis of Freud and Adler" was accepted. Sumner became a professor at various universities and managed to publish several articles despite the refusal of research agencies to provide funding for him because of his color. He was interested in understanding racial bias and supporting educational justice. Sumner is also credited as one of the founders of the psychology department at Howard University, which he chaired from 1928 until his death in 1954. #WeLoveBlackPioneers  #WeLoveBlackDoctors  #BlackHistoryofJanuary12  👑 #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember7  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
On the morning of December 7, 1955, a racial incident involving blacks and whites took place on a golf course in Greensboro, North Carolina.  That particular winter day, George C. Simkins, Jr., awaited the arrival of his five African-American friends and golf partners. . Later that evening, a black police officer arrested the six dissidents and took them to the county jail. Their bail was paid, and the fight to desegregate public golf courses in Greensboro followed. The six golfers were eventually found guilty of trespassing and sentenced to 30 days in jail. They lost an appeal in superior court, got an active jail sentence, but continued the fight at the federal court level. There, Judge Johnson J. Hayes ruled in their favor and issued a declaratory judgment. He ordered Gillespie Park opened to everyone within two weeks. But before the order could be enforced, someone slipped into the Gillespie Park clubhouse and burned it to the ground. City officials refused to rebuild the clubhouse, closed the golf course, reopening it to the public seven years later.
#BlackHistoryYouShouldKnow
The #GreensboroSix eventually appealed the original decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. They attempted to get Thurgood Marshall, chief counsel for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, to represent them but he refused to take the case. Marshall felt they should have gotten an injunction to play the course, saying they would lose by one vote and that Justice Tom Clark would be the deciding vote, which was exactly what happened. Governor Luther Hodges commuted their sentences but it was small consolation.
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember7
#BlackHistoryofDecember
On the morning of December 7, 1955, a racial incident involving blacks and whites took place on a golf course in Greensboro, North Carolina.  That particular winter day, George C. Simkins, Jr., awaited the arrival of his five African-American friends and golf partners. . Later that evening, a black police officer arrested the six dissidents and took them to the county jail. Their bail was paid, and the fight to desegregate public golf courses in Greensboro followed. The six golfers were eventually found guilty of trespassing and sentenced to 30 days in jail. They lost an appeal in superior court, got an active jail sentence, but continued the fight at the federal court level. There, Judge Johnson J. Hayes ruled in their favor and issued a declaratory judgment. He ordered Gillespie Park opened to everyone within two weeks. But before the order could be enforced, someone slipped into the Gillespie Park clubhouse and burned it to the ground. City officials refused to rebuild the clubhouse, closed the golf course, reopening it to the public seven years later. #BlackHistoryYouShouldKnow  The #GreensboroSix  eventually appealed the original decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. They attempted to get Thurgood Marshall, chief counsel for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, to represent them but he refused to take the case. Marshall felt they should have gotten an injunction to play the course, saying they would lose by one vote and that Justice Tom Clark would be the deciding vote, which was exactly what happened. Governor Luther Hodges commuted their sentences but it was small consolation. #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember7  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
Who was William Braithwaite?
#WilliamBraithwaite, the acclaimed poet and anthologist, was born in Boston on December 6, 1878. He was the second of five children born to William Smith Braithwaite and Emma Dewolfe Braithwaite. #WilliamStanleyBraithwaite’s father, originally from British Guiana, was a man of mixed racial heritage who had spent considerable time in England studying medicine, using the legacy left to him by a French grandmother. His mother, who almost passed for white, was the daughter of a mulatto ex-slave who had come North in the years following Civil War. 
While William Stanley’s father was alive, the children were tutored at home in the usual subjects, as well as less common subjects such as French. Along with a superior education, William Stanley was also raised to consider only white children as his peers and to associate himself with the best and brightest among them whenever possible. These attitudes about race were inherited from his father, but would have less influence over him as the years went by.
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
#BlackHistoryofJune8 
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveBlackPoets
#WeLoveBlackAuthors
Who was William Braithwaite? #WilliamBraithwaite , the acclaimed poet and anthologist, was born in Boston on December 6, 1878. He was the second of five children born to William Smith Braithwaite and Emma Dewolfe Braithwaite. #WilliamStanleyBraithwaite ’s father, originally from British Guiana, was a man of mixed racial heritage who had spent considerable time in England studying medicine, using the legacy left to him by a French grandmother. His mother, who almost passed for white, was the daughter of a mulatto ex-slave who had come North in the years following Civil War. While William Stanley’s father was alive, the children were tutored at home in the usual subjects, as well as less common subjects such as French. Along with a superior education, William Stanley was also raised to consider only white children as his peers and to associate himself with the best and brightest among them whenever possible. These attitudes about race were inherited from his father, but would have less influence over him as the years went by. #LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite  #BlackHistoryofJune8  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveBlackPoets  #WeLoveBlackAuthors 
Maze and Frankie Beverly!!! #FrankieBeverly never thought of himself as part of the Philly sound, and while his band does have Philly influences, it didn't fit into either the Gamble & Huff/Philadelphia International school of Philly soul or the Thom Bell/Linda Creed school (which the Delfonics, the Moments, and the Stylistics were a part of). Further, Raw Soul's sound owed as much to Marvin Gaye and the Isley Brothers as it did to any of the soulsters who came out of Philly in the '60s or '70s.
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveRetroSoul
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
Maze and Frankie Beverly!!! #FrankieBeverly  never thought of himself as part of the Philly sound, and while his band does have Philly influences, it didn't fit into either the Gamble & Huff/Philadelphia International school of Philly soul or the Thom Bell/Linda Creed school (which the Delfonics, the Moments, and the Stylistics were a part of). Further, Raw Soul's sound owed as much to Marvin Gaye and the Isley Brothers as it did to any of the soulsters who came out of Philly in the '60s or '70s. #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveRetroSoul  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
#BlackSolidarityorDeath #UmojaFestival
Maze and Frankie Beverly!
#CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday 🎶
Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of Marvin Gaye, #MazefeaturingFrankieBeverly was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive Maze and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter Beverly didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a Northern soul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveRetroSoul
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackSolidarityorDeath  #UmojaFestival  Maze and Frankie Beverly! #CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday  🎶 Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of Marvin Gaye, #MazefeaturingFrankieBeverly  was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive Maze and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter Beverly didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a Northern soul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveRetroSoul  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
👑
Maze and Frankie Beverly!
#CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday 🎶
Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of Marvin Gaye, Maze featuring #FrankieBeverly was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive #Maze and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter Beverly didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing #FrankieLymon&theTeenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a #Northernsoul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveRetroSoul
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
👑 Maze and Frankie Beverly! #CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday  🎶 Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of Marvin Gaye, Maze featuring #FrankieBeverly  was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive #Maze  and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter Beverly didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing #FrankieLymon &theTeenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a #Northernsoul  approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveRetroSoul  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
Maze and Frankie Beverly!

Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of #MarvinGaye, #MazefeaturingFrankieBeverly was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive Maze and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter #FrankieBeverly didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a Northern soul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden.
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveRetroSoul
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
Maze and Frankie Beverly! Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of #MarvinGaye , #MazefeaturingFrankieBeverly  was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive Maze and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter #FrankieBeverly  didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a Northern soul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden. #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveRetroSoul  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
Maze and Frankie Beverly!
#CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday 🎶
Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of Marvin Gaye, #MazefeaturingFrankieBeverly was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive #Maze and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter #FrankieBeverly didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a Northern soul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden.
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveRetroSoul
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
Maze and Frankie Beverly! #CelebratingBlackHistoryEveryday  🎶 Combining a Philadelphia soul sound with a strong appreciation of Marvin Gaye, #MazefeaturingFrankieBeverly  was among the top R&B acts of the late '70s and '80s. The distinctive #Maze  and its charismatic lead singer, founder, producer, and songwriter #FrankieBeverly  didn't have many pop hits, but they were extremely popular among soul and urban contemporary audiences and enjoyed at least six or seven gold albums. Beverly was born Howard Beverly in Philadelphia, PA, on December 6, 1946; he started calling himself Frankie after hearing Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers (a major doo wop group) when he was only nine years old in 1956. Before that, Beverly had been singing gospel in church, and it was Lymon who made him realize that he wanted to perform secular music. That isn't to say that Beverly's appreciation of gospel ever went away; the gospel influence remained when he was in his forties and fifties, but secular R&B would be his main focus. When Beverly was 12, he joined the Philly doo wop group the Silhouettes (who were known for their hit "Get a Job") and went on tour with them in 1959. Then, in the early '60s, he founded and led a short-lived doo wop/soul vocal group called the Blenders. After the Blenders' breakup, a 17-year-old Beverly founded another vocal group in 1963: the Butlers, who favored a Northern soul approach. The Butlers never became well-known nationally, although they did provide a few singles (including "The Sun's Message" and "She Tried to Kiss Me") and recorded for small, Philly based labels like Fairmount, Liberty Bell, and Guyden. #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveRetroSoul  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
Frankie Beverly Story!
#FrankieBeverly never thought of himself as part of the Philly sound, and while his band does have Philly influences, it didn't fit into either the Gamble & Huff/Philadelphia International school of Philly soul or the Thom Bell/Linda Creed school (which the Delfonics, the Moments, and the Stylistics were a part of). Further, Raw Soul's sound owed as much to Marvin Gaye and the Isley Brothers as it did to any of the soulsters who came out of Philly in the '60s or '70s.

Feeling out of place in his home town, Beverly moved Raw Soul to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1971. Raw Soul had been playing the San Francisco/Oakland scene for several years when Beverly's idol, Marvin Gaye, became aware of the band. Quite impressed by Beverly's singing and songwriting, Gaye sang Raw Soul's praises to Capitol and helped them land a deal with that major label in 1976. One thing Gaye didn't like about Beverly's band was the name Raw Soul. The late soul giant insisted on a name change and after considering a few other names (including Karmaand Charisma), Raw Soul officially became Maze Featuring Frankie Beverly in 1976. (The name Karma wouldn't have worked because an obscure, L.A.-based funk/jazz outfit called Karma was recording for A&M around 1976-1977).
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
#WeLoveRetroSoul
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
Frankie Beverly Story! #FrankieBeverly  never thought of himself as part of the Philly sound, and while his band does have Philly influences, it didn't fit into either the Gamble & Huff/Philadelphia International school of Philly soul or the Thom Bell/Linda Creed school (which the Delfonics, the Moments, and the Stylistics were a part of). Further, Raw Soul's sound owed as much to Marvin Gaye and the Isley Brothers as it did to any of the soulsters who came out of Philly in the '60s or '70s. Feeling out of place in his home town, Beverly moved Raw Soul to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1971. Raw Soul had been playing the San Francisco/Oakland scene for several years when Beverly's idol, Marvin Gaye, became aware of the band. Quite impressed by Beverly's singing and songwriting, Gaye sang Raw Soul's praises to Capitol and helped them land a deal with that major label in 1976. One thing Gaye didn't like about Beverly's band was the name Raw Soul. The late soul giant insisted on a name change and after considering a few other names (including Karmaand Charisma), Raw Soul officially became Maze Featuring Frankie Beverly in 1976. (The name Karma wouldn't have worked because an obscure, L.A.-based funk/jazz outfit called Karma was recording for A&M around 1976-1977). #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #WeLoveRetroSoul  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers 
December 7, 1941 unsung hero.  #PearllHarbor 
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#DorrisMiller was a mess attendant on the U.S.S. West Virginia when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7th of 1941. Though Miller served his time as a cook, his bravery aided fellow wounded soldiers. Miller carried his shipmates to safety while Japanese bombs killed hundreds of soldiers on board. Miller also manned a 50-caliber anti-aircraft machine gun until it ran out of ammunition and he had to abandon ship. The military awarded his bravery with the Naval Cross
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofNovember24
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofDecember7
#BlackHistoryofOctober12
#WeLoveBlackWarHeros - #DorieMiller
December 7, 1941 unsung hero. #PearllHarbor  #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #DorrisMiller  was a mess attendant on the U.S.S. West Virginia when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7th of 1941. Though Miller served his time as a cook, his bravery aided fellow wounded soldiers. Miller carried his shipmates to safety while Japanese bombs killed hundreds of soldiers on board. Miller also manned a 50-caliber anti-aircraft machine gun until it ran out of ammunition and he had to abandon ship. The military awarded his bravery with the Naval Cross #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofNovember24  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember7  #BlackHistoryofOctober12  #WeLoveBlackWarHeros  - #DorieMiller 
#ReginaldLewis born on this date in 1942, in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1968. 
He was a partner in Murphy, Thorpe & Lewis, the first Black law firm on Wall Street. His company TLC Beatrice reported revenue of $1.8 billion in 1987, it became the first black-owned company to have more than $1 billion in annual sales.

On this date in 1862, #FortNegley, Nashville, TN, was completed. This military facility was built during the American Civil War mainly with Black labor supervised by the Union Army.

#FrancisSumner was born on this date in1895. He was an African American educator and psychologist. 
#HattieWilliams was born on this date in 1922. She was an African American humanitarian and educational activist.

Reverend #WiltonDGregory was born in Chicago on this date in 1947. He is an African American Roman Catholic bishop and the seventh bishop of Belleville, Illinois.

#PearlCleage, an African American writer, was born in Springfield, MA, on this date in 1948.

On this date in 1955, #CalvinJones became the first African American college football player to win the Outland Trophy as the best linebacker in America.

This date in 1955 marks the incident of the “#GreensboroSix,” a racial episode involving blacks and whites.

#BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear
#BlackHistoryofDecember7
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory 📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ReginaldLewis  born on this date in 1942, in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1968. He was a partner in Murphy, Thorpe & Lewis, the first Black law firm on Wall Street. His company TLC Beatrice reported revenue of $1.8 billion in 1987, it became the first black-owned company to have more than $1 billion in annual sales. On this date in 1862, #FortNegley , Nashville, TN, was completed. This military facility was built during the American Civil War mainly with Black labor supervised by the Union Army. #FrancisSumner  was born on this date in1895. He was an African American educator and psychologist. #HattieWilliams  was born on this date in 1922. She was an African American humanitarian and educational activist. Reverend #WiltonDGregory  was born in Chicago on this date in 1947. He is an African American Roman Catholic bishop and the seventh bishop of Belleville, Illinois. #PearlCleage , an African American writer, was born in Springfield, MA, on this date in 1948. On this date in 1955, #CalvinJones  became the first African American college football player to win the Outland Trophy as the best linebacker in America. This date in 1955 marks the incident of the “#GreensboroSix ,” a racial episode involving blacks and whites. #BlackHistoryEverydayofTheYear  #BlackHistoryofDecember7  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  📅 #BlackHistoryofNovember  #TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#ReginaldFLewis was the nation’s richest African-American in the ’80’s and the first to build a billion-dollar company. This morning in his hometown of Baltimore, the late pioneering Black tycoon’s life will be celebrated at the museum that bears his name on the day of his birth.

Lewis was born December 7, 1942 in Baltimore, Md. Stating, in his words, that his neighborhood was “semi-tough,” Lewis excelled in academics and sports in high school. Entering Virginia State University in 1961 on an athletic scholarship, Lewis majored in economics. After losing his scholarship due to an injury and facing some academic struggles, Lewis eventually found his footing.
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#DayInBlackHistory 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofDecember - #regrann
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #ReginaldFLewis  was the nation’s richest African-American in the ’80’s and the first to build a billion-dollar company. This morning in his hometown of Baltimore, the late pioneering Black tycoon’s life will be celebrated at the museum that bears his name on the day of his birth. Lewis was born December 7, 1942 in Baltimore, Md. Stating, in his words, that his neighborhood was “semi-tough,” Lewis excelled in academics and sports in high school. Entering Virginia State University in 1961 on an athletic scholarship, Lewis majored in economics. After losing his scholarship due to an injury and facing some academic struggles, Lewis eventually found his footing. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #DayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  - #regrann 
#TodayInBlackExcellence
December 6, 1932
#RichardBSpikes received a patent for an automatic gear shift for cars. Major companies welcomed his inventions.

He invented a beer keg tap which Milwaukee Brewing bought. He invented automobile directional signals, which were first introduced in the Pierce Arrow, and soon became standard in all automobiles. For his innovative designs of transmission and gear-shifting devices, Spikes received over $100,000.00 in the 1930s.

By the time he was creating the automatic safety brake in 1962, Spikes was losing his vision. To complete the device, he first created a drafting machine for blind designers. The machine would soon be used in almost every school bus in the nation.
#WeLoveBlackInventors
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
#TodayInBlackExcellence👑

#RichardSpikes died in 1963.
#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
 #BlackHistoryofDecember -
#TodayInBlackExcellence  December 6, 1932 #RichardBSpikes  received a patent for an automatic gear shift for cars. Major companies welcomed his inventions. He invented a beer keg tap which Milwaukee Brewing bought. He invented automobile directional signals, which were first introduced in the Pierce Arrow, and soon became standard in all automobiles. For his innovative designs of transmission and gear-shifting devices, Spikes received over $100,000.00 in the 1930s. By the time he was creating the automatic safety brake in 1962, Spikes was losing his vision. To complete the device, he first created a drafting machine for blind designers. The machine would soon be used in almost every school bus in the nation. #WeLoveBlackInventors  #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  #TodayInBlackExcellence 👑 #RichardSpikes  died in 1963. #TodayInBlackHistory  #Tibh  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember  -
Today We Commemorate Dr. Jeanne L. Noble. She was an African American educator and writer.
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
#JeanneLNoble a resident of New York City, she was the first African American woman to move from assistant to full professor at the New York University School of Education. An innovator and visionary, Noble completed the first basic research on Black women in college (1950s) and published the book, "The Negro Woman’s College Education." In the 1970s, her book, "Beautiful, Also, Are the Souls of My Black Sisters," was published. She was appointed to many federal national commissions by United States Presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, and Gerald Ford.

#DrJeanNoble was a leader of the Women’s Job Corps Program, and served on the board of directors of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Dr. #JeanneNoble died in November 2002 at New York University hospital.
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackEducators
#WeLoveBlackAuthor
Today We Commemorate Dr. Jeanne L. Noble. She was an African American educator and writer. #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  #JeanneLNoble  a resident of New York City, she was the first African American woman to move from assistant to full professor at the New York University School of Education. An innovator and visionary, Noble completed the first basic research on Black women in college (1950s) and published the book, "The Negro Woman’s College Education." In the 1970s, her book, "Beautiful, Also, Are the Souls of My Black Sisters," was published. She was appointed to many federal national commissions by United States Presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, and Gerald Ford. #DrJeanNoble  was a leader of the Women’s Job Corps Program, and served on the board of directors of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Dr. #JeanneNoble  died in November 2002 at New York University hospital. #LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackEducators  #WeLoveBlackAuthor 
Jimmy Bivins was an early 20th Century African American heavyweight boxer whose professional career ran from 1940 to 1955.
#WeLoveBlackAthletes
#JimmyBivins first fight after losing to Pastor was a split-decision win against Joey Maxim, a fellow Cleveland fighter who went on to become a member of the hall of fame. Bivins fought four more contests in 1942, including a rematch with Bob Pastor and a bout with Lee Savold, and won them all. He began 1943 with a remarkable win against Ezzard Chars, in which he recorded seven knockdowns against the future heavyweight world champion. On February 23, 1943 he defeated Anton Christoforidis on points for the duration light heavyweight title - as all the world titles had been frozen for the duration of World War II, this was the closest he ever came to holding the Belt. In the three years after this fight Bivins went on to defeat Tami Mauriello, Pat Valentino, Lloyd Marshall, Melio Bettina, Curtis Sheppard and Archie Moore, whom he knocked-down six times en route to a knockout victory. Bivins served with the United States Army from March 1944 until his honorable discharge in November of the same year; during 1944 he fought only one professional fight, a points victory over Lee Q. Murray. On February 25, 1946 Bivins lost to Jersey Joe Walcott at the Cleveland Arena.

After losing his long unbeaten streak, Bivins' record as a fighter became somewhat average. Bivins retired following a victory over the journeyman Chubby Wright in June 1953, but returned for two final fights, both of which he won, a couple of years later. Although he was never given the opportunity to fight for a world title, despite at one point being the number one contender in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions, Bivins fought and defeated many of the great fighters of his era. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1999.

He was also the one-time husband of Dollree Mapp, the subject of prominent Supreme Court case regarding the rights of search and seizures. Jimmy Bivins died on July 4, 2012.
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#BlackHistoryofJuly4 👑
#TodayInBlackHistory 
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember
Jimmy Bivins was an early 20th Century African American heavyweight boxer whose professional career ran from 1940 to 1955. #WeLoveBlackAthletes  #JimmyBivins  first fight after losing to Pastor was a split-decision win against Joey Maxim, a fellow Cleveland fighter who went on to become a member of the hall of fame. Bivins fought four more contests in 1942, including a rematch with Bob Pastor and a bout with Lee Savold, and won them all. He began 1943 with a remarkable win against Ezzard Chars, in which he recorded seven knockdowns against the future heavyweight world champion. On February 23, 1943 he defeated Anton Christoforidis on points for the duration light heavyweight title - as all the world titles had been frozen for the duration of World War II, this was the closest he ever came to holding the Belt. In the three years after this fight Bivins went on to defeat Tami Mauriello, Pat Valentino, Lloyd Marshall, Melio Bettina, Curtis Sheppard and Archie Moore, whom he knocked-down six times en route to a knockout victory. Bivins served with the United States Army from March 1944 until his honorable discharge in November of the same year; during 1944 he fought only one professional fight, a points victory over Lee Q. Murray. On February 25, 1946 Bivins lost to Jersey Joe Walcott at the Cleveland Arena. After losing his long unbeaten streak, Bivins' record as a fighter became somewhat average. Bivins retired following a victory over the journeyman Chubby Wright in June 1953, but returned for two final fights, both of which he won, a couple of years later. Although he was never given the opportunity to fight for a world title, despite at one point being the number one contender in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions, Bivins fought and defeated many of the great fighters of his era. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1999. He was also the one-time husband of Dollree Mapp, the subject of prominent Supreme Court case regarding the rights of search and seizures. Jimmy Bivins died on July 4, 2012. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #BlackHistoryofJuly4  👑 #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
Jesse B. Blayton, Sr., was a pioneer African American radio stationentrepreneur. 
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
Blayton founded WERD-AM in Atlanta, Georgiaon October 3, 1949 making him the first African American to own and operate a radio station in the United States.
#WeLoveBlackEnterprise
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
#JesseBlayton was born in Fallis, Oklahoma, on December 6, 1879. He graduated from the University of Chicago (Illinois) in 1922 and then moved to Atlanta, Georgia to establish a private practice as an accountant. Blayton passed the Georgia accounting examination in 1928, becoming the state's first black Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and only the fourth African American nationwide to hold the certification.

Blayton also taught accounting at Atlanta University where he encouraged younger blacks to enter the profession.  He had little success. 
#JesseBBlaytonSr. sold #WERD in 1968 upon his retirement.  He died on September 7, 1977 in Atlanta.  In 1995 he was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame.
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofSeptember7
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackEnterprise
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
Jesse B. Blayton, Sr., was a pioneer African American radio stationentrepreneur. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  Blayton founded WERD-AM in Atlanta, Georgiaon October 3, 1949 making him the first African American to own and operate a radio station in the United States. #WeLoveBlackEnterprise  #WeLoveBlackPioneers  #JesseBlayton  was born in Fallis, Oklahoma, on December 6, 1879. He graduated from the University of Chicago (Illinois) in 1922 and then moved to Atlanta, Georgia to establish a private practice as an accountant. Blayton passed the Georgia accounting examination in 1928, becoming the state's first black Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and only the fourth African American nationwide to hold the certification. Blayton also taught accounting at Atlanta University where he encouraged younger blacks to enter the profession.  He had little success. #JesseBBlaytonSr . sold #WERD  in 1968 upon his retirement.  He died on September 7, 1977 in Atlanta.  In 1995 he was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame. #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofSeptember7  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackEnterprise  #WeLoveBlackPioneers 
Jesse B. Blayton, Sr., was a pioneer African American radio stationentrepreneur. 
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
Blayton founded WERD-AM in Atlanta, Georgiaon October 3, 1949 making him the first African American to own and operate a radio station in the United States.
#WeLoveBlackEnterprise
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
#JesseBlayton was born in Fallis, Oklahoma, on December 6, 1879. He graduated from the University of Chicago (Illinois) in 1922 and then moved to Atlanta, Georgia to establish a private practice as an accountant. Blayton passed the Georgia accounting examination in 1928, becoming the state's first black Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and only the fourth African American nationwide to hold the certification.

Blayton also taught accounting at Atlanta University where he encouraged younger blacks to enter the profession.  He had little success. 
#JesseBBlaytonSr. sold #WERD in 1968 upon his retirement.  He died on September 7, 1977 in Atlanta.  In 1995 he was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame.
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofSeptember7
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackEnterprise
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
#TodayInBlackExcellence👑
Jesse B. Blayton, Sr., was a pioneer African American radio stationentrepreneur. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  Blayton founded WERD-AM in Atlanta, Georgiaon October 3, 1949 making him the first African American to own and operate a radio station in the United States. #WeLoveBlackEnterprise  #WeLoveBlackPioneers  #JesseBlayton  was born in Fallis, Oklahoma, on December 6, 1879. He graduated from the University of Chicago (Illinois) in 1922 and then moved to Atlanta, Georgia to establish a private practice as an accountant. Blayton passed the Georgia accounting examination in 1928, becoming the state's first black Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and only the fourth African American nationwide to hold the certification. Blayton also taught accounting at Atlanta University where he encouraged younger blacks to enter the profession.  He had little success. #JesseBBlaytonSr . sold #WERD  in 1968 upon his retirement.  He died on September 7, 1977 in Atlanta.  In 1995 he was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame. #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofSeptember7  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackEnterprise  #WeLoveBlackPioneers  #TodayInBlackExcellence 👑
Educator and Activist. Morrison Warren!
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#MorrisonWarren was a 20th Century African American educator, activist and administrator.

Warren was also a professional football player with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

As an educator, Warren began teaching at Dunbar Elementary in Phoenix, AZ. He also became principal and soon earned his M.A. in School Community Relations. From there he became principal at Booker T. Washington, installing a vigorous program “Foundation of Understanding” that emphasized the role of parents in the educational process. In 1959, he completed his Doctorate program in Education Administration and Supervision.

Morrison Warren served on many committees such as Head Start and the Arizona Advisory Committee to U.S. Civil Rights Commission. In 1966 he was appointed to the Phoenix City Council and two years later accepted a faculty position at Arizona State University. There he was director of the IDB Payne Laboratory School of the University, a school that was dedicated to the exploration and use of Culture in Education. A Fiesta Bowl Board President in 1981, Warren has been characterized as a “bridge builder” and one who lived by the principles instilled in him at an early age by his parents: the absolute importance of education, hard work, excellence, fair play, contribution, dreams, persistence, humility, and love of God.

His many accomplishments throughout his lifetime of service include Professor Emeritus in the College of Education at ASU, the first African American Phoenix City Councilman and Vice Mayor of the City of Phoenix. They exemplify his hard-won personal success and his commitment to humankind. Dr. Morrison F. Warren died on April 9, 2002. A scholarship in his name has been created at Arizona State University’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College.

#BlackHistoryofDecember -
#BlackHistoryofDecember6-
#BlackHistoryofApril9
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackEducators
#WeLoveBlackActivist
Educator and Activist. Morrison Warren! #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #MorrisonWarren  was a 20th Century African American educator, activist and administrator. Warren was also a professional football player with the Brooklyn Dodgers. As an educator, Warren began teaching at Dunbar Elementary in Phoenix, AZ. He also became principal and soon earned his M.A. in School Community Relations. From there he became principal at Booker T. Washington, installing a vigorous program “Foundation of Understanding” that emphasized the role of parents in the educational process. In 1959, he completed his Doctorate program in Education Administration and Supervision. Morrison Warren served on many committees such as Head Start and the Arizona Advisory Committee to U.S. Civil Rights Commission. In 1966 he was appointed to the Phoenix City Council and two years later accepted a faculty position at Arizona State University. There he was director of the IDB Payne Laboratory School of the University, a school that was dedicated to the exploration and use of Culture in Education. A Fiesta Bowl Board President in 1981, Warren has been characterized as a “bridge builder” and one who lived by the principles instilled in him at an early age by his parents: the absolute importance of education, hard work, excellence, fair play, contribution, dreams, persistence, humility, and love of God. His many accomplishments throughout his lifetime of service include Professor Emeritus in the College of Education at ASU, the first African American Phoenix City Councilman and Vice Mayor of the City of Phoenix. They exemplify his hard-won personal success and his commitment to humankind. Dr. Morrison F. Warren died on April 9, 2002. A scholarship in his name has been created at Arizona State University’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. #BlackHistoryofDecember  - #BlackHistoryofDecember6 - #BlackHistoryofApril9  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackEducators  #WeLoveBlackActivist 
The identical twin brothers, Larry and Laurent Bourgeois, are natural-born, self-taught dancers who grew up the youngest of nine children in the ghetto of Sarcelles, France and began their professional careers at the age of 12. After gaining popularity while participating in competitions across the world, they've since performed with the likes of the aformentioned power couple, Missy Elliott, and Meghan Trainor.

According to the twins, they learned major life lessons after working with Bey and Jay. "One day, we had a show with JAY—and it's JAY-Z; for me, there's no one bigger than his in hip-hop entertainment," said Laurent. "We had one of the best numbers in the show on the whole tour. He's like, 'Don't come on stage.' The day before the show. We've been in rehearsal a month and he's like, 'Don't come for this number.' I was like, I was about to cry. It was for 'On to the Next One.'" #LarryBourgeois & #LaurentBourgeois
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackDance
#WeLoveBlackChoreographers
The identical twin brothers, Larry and Laurent Bourgeois, are natural-born, self-taught dancers who grew up the youngest of nine children in the ghetto of Sarcelles, France and began their professional careers at the age of 12. After gaining popularity while participating in competitions across the world, they've since performed with the likes of the aformentioned power couple, Missy Elliott, and Meghan Trainor. According to the twins, they learned major life lessons after working with Bey and Jay. "One day, we had a show with JAY—and it's JAY-Z; for me, there's no one bigger than his in hip-hop entertainment," said Laurent. "We had one of the best numbers in the show on the whole tour. He's like, 'Don't come on stage.' The day before the show. We've been in rehearsal a month and he's like, 'Don't come for this number.' I was like, I was about to cry. It was for 'On to the Next One.'" #LarryBourgeois  & #LaurentBourgeois  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackDance  #WeLoveBlackChoreographers 
Les Twins
Arguably The Best Dance Duo 🌎

Professionally known as #LesTwins, identical twin brothers Laurent Nicolas and Larry Nicolas Bourgeois are French dancers, choreographers, producers, and models and designers and creative directors of their brand "Eleven Paris". The identical twin brothers, Larry and Laurent Bourgeois, are natural-born, self-taught dancers who grew up the youngest of nine children in the ghetto of Sarcelles, France and began their professional careers at the age of 12. After gaining popularity while participating in competitions across the world, they've since performed with the likes of the aformentioned power couple, Missy Elliott, and Meghan Trainor.

According to the twins, they learned major life lessons after working with Bey and Jay. "One day, we had a show with JAY—and it's JAY-Z; for me, there's no one bigger than his in hip-hop entertainment," said Laurent. "We had one of the best numbers in the show on the whole tour. He's like, 'Don't come on stage.' The day before the show. We've been in rehearsal a month and he's like, 'Don't come for this number.' I was like, I was about to cry. It was for 'On to the Next One.'" #LarryBourgeois & #LaurentBourgeois
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackDance
#WeLoveBlackChoreographers
Les Twins Arguably The Best Dance Duo 🌎 Professionally known as #LesTwins , identical twin brothers Laurent Nicolas and Larry Nicolas Bourgeois are French dancers, choreographers, producers, and models and designers and creative directors of their brand "Eleven Paris". The identical twin brothers, Larry and Laurent Bourgeois, are natural-born, self-taught dancers who grew up the youngest of nine children in the ghetto of Sarcelles, France and began their professional careers at the age of 12. After gaining popularity while participating in competitions across the world, they've since performed with the likes of the aformentioned power couple, Missy Elliott, and Meghan Trainor. According to the twins, they learned major life lessons after working with Bey and Jay. "One day, we had a show with JAY—and it's JAY-Z; for me, there's no one bigger than his in hip-hop entertainment," said Laurent. "We had one of the best numbers in the show on the whole tour. He's like, 'Don't come on stage.' The day before the show. We've been in rehearsal a month and he's like, 'Don't come for this number.' I was like, I was about to cry. It was for 'On to the Next One.'" #LarryBourgeois  & #LaurentBourgeois  #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackDance  #WeLoveBlackChoreographers 
HBD @laurenlondon 
#LaurenNicoleLondon first appeared in the film, ATL, opposite actor and recording artist, Tip "TI" Harris. Due to London's breakout success in ATL, she received an offer to star in the film, This Christmas, with Loretta Devine, Idris Elba and Regina King. Her next film role was in the teen romantic comedy, I Love You, Beth Cooper, opposite Hayden Panettiere. London made her television debut on Everybody Hates Chris. Her other television credits include a recurring guest star role on HBO's Entourage, a recurring guest star role on CW's 90210 and a special guest star role in the VH1 series, Singles Ladies, executive produced by Queen Latifah. #LaurenLondon's next feature film is Madea's Big Happy Family, directed by Tyler Perry. She is a Los Angeles native.
#BlackHistoryofDecember5
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackActors
#WeLoveBlackCinema
HBD @laurenlondon #LaurenNicoleLondon  first appeared in the film, ATL, opposite actor and recording artist, Tip "TI" Harris. Due to London's breakout success in ATL, she received an offer to star in the film, This Christmas, with Loretta Devine, Idris Elba and Regina King. Her next film role was in the teen romantic comedy, I Love You, Beth Cooper, opposite Hayden Panettiere. London made her television debut on Everybody Hates Chris. Her other television credits include a recurring guest star role on HBO's Entourage, a recurring guest star role on CW's 90210 and a special guest star role in the VH1 series, Singles Ladies, executive produced by Queen Latifah. #LaurenLondon 's next feature film is Madea's Big Happy Family, directed by Tyler Perry. She is a Los Angeles native. #BlackHistoryofDecember5  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackActors  #WeLoveBlackCinema 
Marcus Alan Williams (born September 8, 1996) is an American football safety for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Utah.

#MarcusWilliams received an invitation to the NFL Combine and completed all of the combine drills. He also attended Utah's Pro Day and opted to only run positional drills for team scouts and representatives. NFL draft experts and analysts projected him to be selected in the second or third round. He was ranked the fifth best safety in the draft by NFL analyst Bucky Brooks, Mike Mayock, and Sports Illustrated, ranked the third best free safety by NFLDraftScout.com, and was ranked the eighth best safety by ESPN.
#BlackHistoryofSeptember8
#BlackHistoryofSeptember
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackAthletes
Marcus Alan Williams (born September 8, 1996) is an American football safety for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Utah. #MarcusWilliams  received an invitation to the NFL Combine and completed all of the combine drills. He also attended Utah's Pro Day and opted to only run positional drills for team scouts and representatives. NFL draft experts and analysts projected him to be selected in the second or third round. He was ranked the fifth best safety in the draft by NFL analyst Bucky Brooks, Mike Mayock, and Sports Illustrated, ranked the third best free safety by NFLDraftScout.com, and was ranked the eighth best safety by ESPN. #BlackHistoryofSeptember8  #BlackHistoryofSeptember  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackAthletes 
Mary Modjeska Monteith Simkins was an African American public health reform, social reform, and the civil rights movement!
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
In 1939, when the South Carolina NAACP was formed, Simkins was already a member of the executive board of the local Columbia NAACP branch and chair of its program committee. She became one of the founders of the state conference, elected to the first executive board, and the first chair of the state programs committee. 
Perhaps her most significant work took place in 1950 with the South Carolina federal court case of Briggs v. Elliott. Working with the Reverend Joseph A. DeLaine, president of the Clarenden County NAACP, she helped write the declaration for the school lawsuit that asked for the equalization of Clarenden County black and white schools. The case was eventually reworked to become one of several individual cases set up to directly challenge the “separate but equal” doctrine in the Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education in Topeka in 1954.

Her sometimes controversial activism resulted in attacks on her life and home. In the late 1950s, during the McCarthyism era, she was accused of subversive activities by the FBI and the House Un-American Activities Committee. After the Brown decision was passed down, accusations against her intensified. In 1957, for the first time in 16 years, Simkins was not nominated as a candidate for secretary by the Nominations Committee of the South Carolina NAACP, probably because of charges that she was a communists.

Simkins also supported two predominantly Black third-party platforms, the Progressive Democratic Party in 1940, and the United Citizens Party in the 1970s. A major figure in South Carolina history, her work spanned more than six decades. She received many honors in her lifetime including the highest commendation given by her home state, the Order of Palmetto. #MaryModjeskaSimkins died in 1992.
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofDecember5
#BlackHistoryoApril5
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackActivist
#WeLoveBlackLeadership
Mary Modjeska Monteith Simkins was an African American public health reform, social reform, and the civil rights movement! #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  In 1939, when the South Carolina NAACP was formed, Simkins was already a member of the executive board of the local Columbia NAACP branch and chair of its program committee. She became one of the founders of the state conference, elected to the first executive board, and the first chair of the state programs committee. Perhaps her most significant work took place in 1950 with the South Carolina federal court case of Briggs v. Elliott. Working with the Reverend Joseph A. DeLaine, president of the Clarenden County NAACP, she helped write the declaration for the school lawsuit that asked for the equalization of Clarenden County black and white schools. The case was eventually reworked to become one of several individual cases set up to directly challenge the “separate but equal” doctrine in the Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education in Topeka in 1954. Her sometimes controversial activism resulted in attacks on her life and home. In the late 1950s, during the McCarthyism era, she was accused of subversive activities by the FBI and the House Un-American Activities Committee. After the Brown decision was passed down, accusations against her intensified. In 1957, for the first time in 16 years, Simkins was not nominated as a candidate for secretary by the Nominations Committee of the South Carolina NAACP, probably because of charges that she was a communists. Simkins also supported two predominantly Black third-party platforms, the Progressive Democratic Party in 1940, and the United Citizens Party in the 1970s. A major figure in South Carolina history, her work spanned more than six decades. She received many honors in her lifetime including the highest commendation given by her home state, the Order of Palmetto. #MaryModjeskaSimkins  died in 1992. #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofDecember5  #BlackHistoryoApril5  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackActivist  #WeLoveBlackLeadership 
@Regran_ed from @herukhuti_heru_behutet - "We live in such a gullible world. Anything that's written, anything that's posted, anything picture that is interpreted one way is taken as truth." -Keri Hilson.

___________________________________________
Keri Hilson Turns 36 Today!
#KeriHilson 🎂

#TodayInBlackHistory #Tibh
#BlackHistoryofDecember5
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofDecember 
#WeloveBlackEntertainers
- #regrann
On this date in 1933, Adolph Caesar, an African American actor, was born.
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow
Born in Harlem, New York, #AdolphCaesar graduated from George Washington High School in New York City. He enlisted in the Navy where he achieved the rank of chief petty officer.

After military retirement he studied dramatic arts at New York University. In 1970, he joined the Negro Ensemble Company, performing in many of their productions including, "The River Niger," "The Brownsville Road," and the one-man show "The Square Root of Soul." He worked with the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Lincoln Center Repertory Company, the American Shakespeare Company in Stratford, Connecticut, and the Center Theater Group at the Mark Tapper Forum in Los Angeles. Caesar came to prominence in 1981 with a strong performance of Sgt. Vernon C. Waters in the Negro Ensemble Company’s production of "A Soldier’s Play." This earned him an Obie Award and a New York Drama Desk Award.

His performance in the film version of the same drama earned him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor in 1984. Other credits included "The Color Purple" (1985) and "Club Paradise" (1986). #AdolphCaesar died during a filming on March 6, 1986.
#BlackHistoryofDecember5
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofMarch6
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackActors
#WeLoveBlackCinema
On this date in 1933, Adolph Caesar, an African American actor, was born. #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #BlackPeopleYouShouldKnow  Born in Harlem, New York, #AdolphCaesar  graduated from George Washington High School in New York City. He enlisted in the Navy where he achieved the rank of chief petty officer. After military retirement he studied dramatic arts at New York University. In 1970, he joined the Negro Ensemble Company, performing in many of their productions including, "The River Niger," "The Brownsville Road," and the one-man show "The Square Root of Soul." He worked with the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Lincoln Center Repertory Company, the American Shakespeare Company in Stratford, Connecticut, and the Center Theater Group at the Mark Tapper Forum in Los Angeles. Caesar came to prominence in 1981 with a strong performance of Sgt. Vernon C. Waters in the Negro Ensemble Company’s production of "A Soldier’s Play." This earned him an Obie Award and a New York Drama Desk Award. His performance in the film version of the same drama earned him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor in 1984. Other credits included "The Color Purple" (1985) and "Club Paradise" (1986). #AdolphCaesar  died during a filming on March 6, 1986. #BlackHistoryofDecember5  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofMarch6  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackActors  #WeLoveBlackCinema 
Annie Green Nelson was ann African American writer.

Nelson's books, "After the Storm" (1945), The Dawn Appears, "Don't Walk on My Dreams," and "Shadows of the South Lan" portray the lifestyles of average black people. Her plays, "Weary Fireside Blues," "T the 'Parrots' Plantation," as well as her book, "To Paw With Love," are autobiographical revealing aspects of her triumphs and tragedies growing up in South Carolina. She is known for turning sorrow into laughter. Her manuscript, "Eighty, So What," is about how great life can be at 80.

Green gavs readings all over her home state. She is a recipient of many honors, including the Lucy Hampton Bostick Award and the P. Scott Kennedy Award for dedication and devotion to African-American theater. Annie Greene Nelson is South Carolina's first known, published, female African-American author.
#BlackHistoryofDecember5
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofDecember23
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackAuthors
Annie Green Nelson was ann African American writer. Nelson's books, "After the Storm" (1945), The Dawn Appears, "Don't Walk on My Dreams," and "Shadows of the South Lan" portray the lifestyles of average black people. Her plays, "Weary Fireside Blues," "T the 'Parrots' Plantation," as well as her book, "To Paw With Love," are autobiographical revealing aspects of her triumphs and tragedies growing up in South Carolina. She is known for turning sorrow into laughter. Her manuscript, "Eighty, So What," is about how great life can be at 80. Green gavs readings all over her home state. She is a recipient of many honors, including the Lucy Hampton Bostick Award and the P. Scott Kennedy Award for dedication and devotion to African-American theater. Annie Greene Nelson is South Carolina's first known, published, female African-American author. #BlackHistoryofDecember5  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofDecember23  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackAuthors 
Geneva Handy Southall was an African American musician, educator, activist, and author.
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
The owner, Scotsman #WillieDunn began to teach some of the local youth how to caddy and play golf. One of his star pupils was John Shippen, Jr. Under the watchful eye of Dunn, Shippen become a fine caddy and an accomplished golfer. He was made an assistant and he gave lessons to some of the club members. In addition, he served as a starter for tournaments, repaired clubs and helped out the maintenance crew, all this at the age of 16. In 1896, his golfing ability was so evident that members encouraged him to enter the second U.S. Open, scheduled to be played at Shinnecock.

With the club’s support, #DrGenevaShippen entered and convinced one of his young friends, Oscar Bunn, a full-blooded Shinnecock Indian, to play also. This was a first for both races in the U.S. Open. It was not long before the nasty side of golf’s elite reared its ugly head. Several of the English and Scottish professionals confronted USGA president Theodore Havemeyer and threatened to withdraw if Shippen and Bunn were allowed to compete. Considering the times, Havemeyer’s response was one of a truly enlightened man. He informed the protesting professionals that the tournament would be played as scheduled, even if Shippen and Bunn were the only players. Everyone arrived for their assigned tee times when the Open started the next morning. Shippen quickly demonstrated his skill by carding a 78 in the first round, leaving him in a tie for first. The early Opens were contested over 36 holes and in the second round #GenevaShippen made the turn with a shot at the title.

Then came hole number 13 where he shot an 11, stopping any chance for the trophy. Still, he finished with an 81, for a 159 total, 5th place, and a $10 prize. Shippen said that hole haunted him his entire life. He just could not believe he took that many strokes on a hole he had played so many times.
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofJanuary2
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackMusicians
#WeLoveBlackEducators
Geneva Handy Southall was an African American musician, educator, activist, and author. #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  The owner, Scotsman #WillieDunn  began to teach some of the local youth how to caddy and play golf. One of his star pupils was John Shippen, Jr. Under the watchful eye of Dunn, Shippen become a fine caddy and an accomplished golfer. He was made an assistant and he gave lessons to some of the club members. In addition, he served as a starter for tournaments, repaired clubs and helped out the maintenance crew, all this at the age of 16. In 1896, his golfing ability was so evident that members encouraged him to enter the second U.S. Open, scheduled to be played at Shinnecock. With the club’s support, #DrGenevaShippen  entered and convinced one of his young friends, Oscar Bunn, a full-blooded Shinnecock Indian, to play also. This was a first for both races in the U.S. Open. It was not long before the nasty side of golf’s elite reared its ugly head. Several of the English and Scottish professionals confronted USGA president Theodore Havemeyer and threatened to withdraw if Shippen and Bunn were allowed to compete. Considering the times, Havemeyer’s response was one of a truly enlightened man. He informed the protesting professionals that the tournament would be played as scheduled, even if Shippen and Bunn were the only players. Everyone arrived for their assigned tee times when the Open started the next morning. Shippen quickly demonstrated his skill by carding a 78 in the first round, leaving him in a tie for first. The early Opens were contested over 36 holes and in the second round #GenevaShippen  made the turn with a shot at the title. Then came hole number 13 where he shot an 11, stopping any chance for the trophy. Still, he finished with an 81, for a 159 total, 5th place, and a $10 prize. Shippen said that hole haunted him his entire life. He just could not believe he took that many strokes on a hole he had played so many times. #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofJanuary2  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackMusicians  #WeLoveBlackEducators 
John Mathew Shippen, Jr., the first African Indigenous American golfer!
#IndigenousHistoryYouShouldKnow
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
With the club’s support, Shippen entered and convinced one of his young friends, Oscar Bunn, a full-blooded Shinnecock Indian, to play also. This was a first for both races in the U.S. Open. It was not long before the nasty side of golf’s elite reared its ugly head. Several of the English and Scottish professionals confronted USGA president Theodore Havemeyer and threatened to withdraw if Shippen and Bunn were allowed to compete. Considering the times, Havemeyer’s response was one of a truly enlightened man. 
He informed the protesting professionals that the tournament would be played as scheduled, even if Shippen and Bunn were the only players. Everyone arrived for their assigned tee times when the Open started the next morning. Shippen quickly demonstrated his skill by carding a 78 in the first round, leaving him in a tie for first. 
Then came hole number 13 where he shot an 11, stopping any chance for the trophy. Still, he finished with an 81, for a 159 total, 5th place, and a $10 prize. Shippen said that hole haunted him his entire life. He just could not believe he took that many strokes on a hole he had played so many times.

He played in four more U.S. Opens but his best finish was in 1902 where he again finished fifth. In 1898 when Shippen’s father completed his tenure as pastor on the Shinnecock Reservation, he moved to Washington. Everyone in the family went with him except young Shippen who stayed in golf, his first love, for the remainder of his life.

He served as golf professional at several clubs with his last stop being the Shady Rest Golf Course in New Jersey in 1924, where he remained until he retired in 1960. He died in 1968 in a nursing home in Newark, N.J.  No African-American played in the Open again until Ted Rhodes in 1948. It wasn’t until 1995 that the John Shippen Memorial Golf Foundation was formed, honoring the memory of one of American golf’s true pioneers
#BlackHistoryofDecember5
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofMay20
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackAthletes
#WeLoveBlac
John Mathew Shippen, Jr., the first African Indigenous American golfer! #IndigenousHistoryYouShouldKnow  #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  With the club’s support, Shippen entered and convinced one of his young friends, Oscar Bunn, a full-blooded Shinnecock Indian, to play also. This was a first for both races in the U.S. Open. It was not long before the nasty side of golf’s elite reared its ugly head. Several of the English and Scottish professionals confronted USGA president Theodore Havemeyer and threatened to withdraw if Shippen and Bunn were allowed to compete. Considering the times, Havemeyer’s response was one of a truly enlightened man. He informed the protesting professionals that the tournament would be played as scheduled, even if Shippen and Bunn were the only players. Everyone arrived for their assigned tee times when the Open started the next morning. Shippen quickly demonstrated his skill by carding a 78 in the first round, leaving him in a tie for first. Then came hole number 13 where he shot an 11, stopping any chance for the trophy. Still, he finished with an 81, for a 159 total, 5th place, and a $10 prize. Shippen said that hole haunted him his entire life. He just could not believe he took that many strokes on a hole he had played so many times. He played in four more U.S. Opens but his best finish was in 1902 where he again finished fifth. In 1898 when Shippen’s father completed his tenure as pastor on the Shinnecock Reservation, he moved to Washington. Everyone in the family went with him except young Shippen who stayed in golf, his first love, for the remainder of his life. He served as golf professional at several clubs with his last stop being the Shady Rest Golf Course in New Jersey in 1924, where he remained until he retired in 1960. He died in 1968 in a nursing home in Newark, N.J. No African-American played in the Open again until Ted Rhodes in 1948. It wasn’t until 1995 that the John Shippen Memorial Golf Foundation was formed, honoring the memory of one of American golf’s true pioneers #BlackHistoryofDecember5  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofMay20  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackAthletes  #WeLoveBlac 
Part I 
Remembering Fred Hampton! "If you walk through life and don't help anybody, you haven't had much of a life." Fred Hampton

Remembering Mark Clark and Fred Hampton!

On December 4, 1969, Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party, and Mark Clark, a fellow member were killed while sleeping by Chicago police.

The attack, aided by the help of an infiltrator, was masterminded by the city police force and the FBI's powerful counter-intelligence program (COINTEL-PRO).
#BlackHistoryofDecember6
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofSeptember7
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackEnterprise
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
Part I Remembering Fred Hampton! "If you walk through life and don't help anybody, you haven't had much of a life." Fred Hampton Remembering Mark Clark and Fred Hampton! On December 4, 1969, Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party, and Mark Clark, a fellow member were killed while sleeping by Chicago police. The attack, aided by the help of an infiltrator, was masterminded by the city police force and the FBI's powerful counter-intelligence program (COINTEL-PRO). #BlackHistoryofDecember6  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofSeptember7  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackEnterprise  #WeLoveBlackPioneers 
Being black, I'm involved in the reparations movement. It's focused toward the African-American audience. We could begin to heal.

I was never interested in singing in the church choir or in school. I was more interested in becoming a musician.

Everything I do is collaborative. It's just my way. I'm really very interested in how the other musicians perceive the song.

Cassandra Wilson (born December 4, 1955) is an American jazz musician, vocalist, songwriter, and producer from Jackson, Mississippi.

#WeLoveJazzLegends
#WeLoveBlackEntertainers
#BlackHistoryofDecember4
#BlackHistory365
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofDecember
Being black, I'm involved in the reparations movement. It's focused toward the African-American audience. We could begin to heal. I was never interested in singing in the church choir or in school. I was more interested in becoming a musician. Everything I do is collaborative. It's just my way. I'm really very interested in how the other musicians perceive the song. Cassandra Wilson (born December 4, 1955) is an American jazz musician, vocalist, songwriter, and producer from Jackson, Mississippi. #WeLoveJazzLegends  #WeLoveBlackEntertainers  #BlackHistoryofDecember4  #BlackHistory365  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofDecember 
Blanche Wilkins Williams was a pioneering African American teacher and disability advocate.
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
#BlackPeopleYouDontKnow
#BlancheWilkinsWilliams went on to teach in schools for “colored” deaf children until schools began replacing deaf teachers with hearing teachers (based on the misconception that hearing teachers would be best able to teach language to deaf children). From 1895-1898, she taught at North Carolina School for Colored Deaf becoming their First Deaf Black Woman teacher.  Also, when the North Carolina (Raleigh) Institution established a department of technical sewing, dressmaking, fancy work, etc., Wilkins was the first black teacher there.

In 1899, #BlancheWilkins became the first Black Deaf person to be placed on an NAD Executive Committee.  Records indicate that she may have also worked at the Texas School for Colored Deaf in Austin, Texas.  After the death of her husband, Wilkins moved to the Chicago, Illinois area and lived there for most of her life, working and teaching young deaf black children and working in factories (beadwork, lampshade work, power machine sewing). She was also involved in missionary work along with her second husband.  The book “Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson”, stated that Wilkins was a passionate Christian missionary and an outspoken advocate for her race and her deaf peers.  Some considered her “the most accomplished deaf lady of her race in America”. She was involved in many advocacy and deaf leadership activities throughout her life and supported others in their endeavors for a better life.  #BlancheWilkins died on March 24, 1936 in Evanston, Illinois and is buried inn Lincoln Cemetery.  In 2018, a new dormitory at Minnesota State Academy, Fairbault, MN. Wilkins Hall was named in her honor.
#BlackHistoryofDecember1
#BlackHistoryofDecember 
#BlackHistoryofMarch24
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#TodayInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackEducators
#WeLoveBlackActivist
Blanche Wilkins Williams was a pioneering African American teacher and disability advocate. #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  #BlackPeopleYouDontKnow  #BlancheWilkinsWilliams  went on to teach in schools for “colored” deaf children until schools began replacing deaf teachers with hearing teachers (based on the misconception that hearing teachers would be best able to teach language to deaf children). From 1895-1898, she taught at North Carolina School for Colored Deaf becoming their First Deaf Black Woman teacher.  Also, when the North Carolina (Raleigh) Institution established a department of technical sewing, dressmaking, fancy work, etc., Wilkins was the first black teacher there. In 1899, #BlancheWilkins  became the first Black Deaf person to be placed on an NAD Executive Committee.  Records indicate that she may have also worked at the Texas School for Colored Deaf in Austin, Texas. After the death of her husband, Wilkins moved to the Chicago, Illinois area and lived there for most of her life, working and teaching young deaf black children and working in factories (beadwork, lampshade work, power machine sewing). She was also involved in missionary work along with her second husband.  The book “Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson”, stated that Wilkins was a passionate Christian missionary and an outspoken advocate for her race and her deaf peers.  Some considered her “the most accomplished deaf lady of her race in America”. She was involved in many advocacy and deaf leadership activities throughout her life and supported others in their endeavors for a better life.  #BlancheWilkins  died on March 24, 1936 in Evanston, Illinois and is buried inn Lincoln Cemetery.  In 2018, a new dormitory at Minnesota State Academy, Fairbault, MN. Wilkins Hall was named in her honor. #BlackHistoryofDecember1  #BlackHistoryofDecember  #BlackHistoryofMarch24  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackEducators  #WeLoveBlackActivist 
The 2nd Female to Record a Blues Album!
#LucilleHagamin
#BlackWomanYouShouldKnow
musical pioneer who was among America’s first wave of jazzand bluesrecording artistsin the 1920s, #LucilleHegamin was born Lucille Nelson in Macon, Georgia, on November 29, 1894. She grew up singing in church, and at the age of fifteen joined a tent-show touring company performing standards of the day. She traveled around the country until 1914 when she settled in Chicago, Illinois. She made a living in nightclubs as a pop, blues, and jazz singer, working with a number of popular musicians of the period including pianists Tony Jackson and Jelly Roll Morton. She occasionally used the alias Fanny Baker and was known to many on the club circuit as “The Georgia Peach.” While in Chicago, she met and married pianist Bill Hegamin. The couple eventually settled in New York City, New York in 1919.

Depression set in, Hegamin’s career declined. In 1932, she made two recordings for Okeh Record and the next year began appearing regularly at the Paradise Café in Atlantic City, New Jersey. In 1934, she retired from performing and became a nurse. During the early 1960s, she made a brief return to the music industry and eventually made her final public performance in 1964 at the Celebrity Club in New York. She died in New York on March 1, 1970.
#BlackHistoryofNovember29
#BlackHistoryofNovember
#BlackHistoryofMarch1
#WeLoveJazzLegends
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#WeLoveBlackPioneers
The 2nd Female to Record a Blues Album! #LucilleHagamin  #BlackWomanYouShouldKnow  musical pioneer who was among America’s first wave of jazzand bluesrecording artistsin the 1920s, #LucilleHegamin  was born Lucille Nelson in Macon, Georgia, on November 29, 1894. She grew up singing in church, and at the age of fifteen joined a tent-show touring company performing standards of the day. She traveled around the country until 1914 when she settled in Chicago, Illinois. She made a living in nightclubs as a pop, blues, and jazz singer, working with a number of popular musicians of the period including pianists Tony Jackson and Jelly Roll Morton. She occasionally used the alias Fanny Baker and was known to many on the club circuit as “The Georgia Peach.” While in Chicago, she met and married pianist Bill Hegamin. The couple eventually settled in New York City, New York in 1919. Depression set in, Hegamin’s career declined. In 1932, she made two recordings for Okeh Record and the next year began appearing regularly at the Paradise Café in Atlantic City, New Jersey. In 1934, she retired from performing and became a nurse. During the early 1960s, she made a brief return to the music industry and eventually made her final public performance in 1964 at the Celebrity Club in New York. She died in New York on March 1, 1970. #BlackHistoryofNovember29  #BlackHistoryofNovember  #BlackHistoryofMarch1  #WeLoveJazzLegends  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackPioneers 
TC Carson is a jazz vocalist, voiceover artist and actor best known for his portrayal of the debonair Kyle Barker on the hit sitcom “Living Single.” TC’s 5-year stint on the show earned him two NAACP Image award nominations for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. TC is also an accomplished voiceover artist serving as the voice of Kratos in the “God of War” video game series, one of the top selling video games of all time, as well as Mace Windu in the “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” animated television series, and as the Shaman Tensi in “Far Cry Primal.” TC began his entertainment career on the stage appearing in numerous theatrical productions including “The Wiz,” “Hair,” “Dreamgirls” and “Ain’t Misbehavin’.”and recently the world premier of “The Golden Fruit” an African Urban adaptation if the Pied Piper written for TC. His movie credits include the military thriller “U-571,” and the fan favorites “Final Destination 2,” “Living Large” and “Gang Related.” TC’s newest jazz album “Live In Beverly Hills” as well as his one of a kind rendition of the jazz standard “My Funny Valentine” are both available now on iTunes, Amazon MP3 and Spotify. Currently he can also be seen in his reoccurring role in “Greenleaf” on the OWN Network.
#TodayInBlackHistory #WeLoveBlackActors
#BlackHistoryofNovember19
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory #BlackHistoryofNovember
TC Carson is a jazz vocalist, voiceover artist and actor best known for his portrayal of the debonair Kyle Barker on the hit sitcom “Living Single.” TC’s 5-year stint on the show earned him two NAACP Image award nominations for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. TC is also an accomplished voiceover artist serving as the voice of Kratos in the “God of War” video game series, one of the top selling video games of all time, as well as Mace Windu in the “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” animated television series, and as the Shaman Tensi in “Far Cry Primal.” TC began his entertainment career on the stage appearing in numerous theatrical productions including “The Wiz,” “Hair,” “Dreamgirls” and “Ain’t Misbehavin’.”and recently the world premier of “The Golden Fruit” an African Urban adaptation if the Pied Piper written for TC. His movie credits include the military thriller “U-571,” and the fan favorites “Final Destination 2,” “Living Large” and “Gang Related.” TC’s newest jazz album “Live In Beverly Hills” as well as his one of a kind rendition of the jazz standard “My Funny Valentine” are both available now on iTunes, Amazon MP3 and Spotify. Currently he can also be seen in his reoccurring role in “Greenleaf” on the OWN Network. #TodayInBlackHistory  #WeLoveBlackActors  #BlackHistoryofNovember19  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofNovember 
Philippa Schuyler a child prodigy and pianist who became famous in the 1930s and 1940s as a result of her talent!

Her parents believed that intermarriage could "invigorate" both races and produce extraordinary offspring. #PhillipaSchuyler was raised in an environment that stressed the importance of intelligence, education, and artistic expression. In her early years, newspaper and other articles wrote about her prodigal development as she crawled at four weeks, walked at eight months, read at two years, and played the piano at age three. At age four, Schuyler could spell four-letter words and was playing piano (her own compositions) on radio.

Fed a diet exclusively of raw foods. As a result, Philippa grew up in her New York City apartment eating a diet predominantly comprising raw carrots, peas and yams and raw steak. She was given a daily ration of cod liver oil and lemon slices in place of sweets.

She had a measured IQ of 180 at age seven, graduated from elementary school at age ten, had written over 100 compositions by thirteen, and for that birthday, completed "Manhattan Nocturne," her first orchestra work, scored for 100 instruments. The New York Philharmonic performed this piece during the last performance of the Young People's Concert season (1944-45). After high school graduation at age fifteen, Schuyler wrote "The Rhapsody of Youth" in honor of the inauguration of Haitian president Paul Magloire. She was knighted for this and gave command performances for Ethiopia’s Halie Selassie and Queen Elizabeth of Belgium.

She was a devoted Catholic, fluent in several languages, and a writer of several books. She began a career in journalism as a news correspondent just before her death. Philippa Schuyler died on May 9, 1967, in a helicopter crash in Da Hang during the Vietnam War. She was trying to help remove Catholic school children from the fighting.
#LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite
#TodayInBlackHistory
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofAugust2
#BlackHistoryofAugust
#BlackHistoryofMay9
#WeLoveBlackComposers
#WeLoveBlackMusicians
Philippa Schuyler a child prodigy and pianist who became famous in the 1930s and 1940s as a result of her talent! Her parents believed that intermarriage could "invigorate" both races and produce extraordinary offspring. #PhillipaSchuyler  was raised in an environment that stressed the importance of intelligence, education, and artistic expression. In her early years, newspaper and other articles wrote about her prodigal development as she crawled at four weeks, walked at eight months, read at two years, and played the piano at age three. At age four, Schuyler could spell four-letter words and was playing piano (her own compositions) on radio. Fed a diet exclusively of raw foods. As a result, Philippa grew up in her New York City apartment eating a diet predominantly comprising raw carrots, peas and yams and raw steak. She was given a daily ration of cod liver oil and lemon slices in place of sweets. She had a measured IQ of 180 at age seven, graduated from elementary school at age ten, had written over 100 compositions by thirteen, and for that birthday, completed "Manhattan Nocturne," her first orchestra work, scored for 100 instruments. The New York Philharmonic performed this piece during the last performance of the Young People's Concert season (1944-45). After high school graduation at age fifteen, Schuyler wrote "The Rhapsody of Youth" in honor of the inauguration of Haitian president Paul Magloire. She was knighted for this and gave command performances for Ethiopia’s Halie Selassie and Queen Elizabeth of Belgium. She was a devoted Catholic, fluent in several languages, and a writer of several books. She began a career in journalism as a news correspondent just before her death. Philippa Schuyler died on May 9, 1967, in a helicopter crash in Da Hang during the Vietnam War. She was trying to help remove Catholic school children from the fighting. #LightBrightAndDamnNearWhite  #TodayInBlackHistory  #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofAugust2  #BlackHistoryofAugust  #BlackHistoryofMay9  #WeLoveBlackComposers  #WeLoveBlackMusicians 
Leroy Robert "Satchel" Paige the best pitcher in baseball history.

Born in Mobile, Alabama, Leroy Robert ("Satchel") Paige earned his nickname as a boy carrying satchels or suitcases at the Mobile train station. Accused of stealing toy rings, Paige was sent to the Mount Meigs, Alabama, reform school. It was here that he began to play baseball, assuming a place on the pitcher's mound that he held for over 40 years, and becoming, according to ballplayer Dizzy Dean, the greatest pitcher of all time. Paige began his career with the semi-pro Mobile Tigers in 1924. He played for several teams in the Negro Leagues. Paige was the most widely known African-American baseball player until Jackie Robinson integrated the major leagues in the late 1940s. 
With a lanky 6'3" body and huge feet, #SatchelPaige's characteristic stance was unmistakable on the mound as he uncoiled his long arms and let the ball fly.

In the 1930s, he drew huge crowds as he was pitted against major leaguers, including Dean. Throughout the 1930s, #LerRoyRobertSatchelPaige appeared regularly in the East-West "All-Star" games, and due, in part, to his enormous popular following, this yearly event drew unprecedented numbers of African-Americans together. The "barnstorming tours" of the Negro League were exhausting, as the teams traveled sometimes as much as 30,000 miles a year to play exhibition games. He once pitched 29 consecutive games in 29 days.

Four years later, he was the first member of the Negro League to be inducted into the #BaseballHallofFame. Paige continued to work as a pitching coach for the Atlanta Braves of the National League. He died in 1982.
#ThisWeekInBlackHistory
#BlackHistoryofJuly
#BlackHistoryofJuly8
#WeLoveBlackAthletes
#TodayInBlackHistory
#BlackHistory365
Leroy Robert "Satchel" Paige the best pitcher in baseball history. Born in Mobile, Alabama, Leroy Robert ("Satchel") Paige earned his nickname as a boy carrying satchels or suitcases at the Mobile train station. Accused of stealing toy rings, Paige was sent to the Mount Meigs, Alabama, reform school. It was here that he began to play baseball, assuming a place on the pitcher's mound that he held for over 40 years, and becoming, according to ballplayer Dizzy Dean, the greatest pitcher of all time. Paige began his career with the semi-pro Mobile Tigers in 1924. He played for several teams in the Negro Leagues. Paige was the most widely known African-American baseball player until Jackie Robinson integrated the major leagues in the late 1940s. With a lanky 6'3" body and huge feet, #SatchelPaige 's characteristic stance was unmistakable on the mound as he uncoiled his long arms and let the ball fly. In the 1930s, he drew huge crowds as he was pitted against major leaguers, including Dean. Throughout the 1930s, #LerRoyRobertSatchelPaige  appeared regularly in the East-West "All-Star" games, and due, in part, to his enormous popular following, this yearly event drew unprecedented numbers of African-Americans together. The "barnstorming tours" of the Negro League were exhausting, as the teams traveled sometimes as much as 30,000 miles a year to play exhibition games. He once pitched 29 consecutive games in 29 days. Four years later, he was the first member of the Negro League to be inducted into the #BaseballHallofFame . Paige continued to work as a pitching coach for the Atlanta Braves of the National League. He died in 1982. #ThisWeekInBlackHistory  #BlackHistoryofJuly  #BlackHistoryofJuly8  #WeLoveBlackAthletes  #TodayInBlackHistory  #BlackHistory365