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Images at The Art Institute of Chicago

WHO’S IN!! Painting the floating World: Ukiyo-e masterpieces from Weston Collection 🖼🎎🧧🎂 Great birthday gift for me totally in for a field trip day #greatbirthdaygift #birthdaywishes #scorpioseason♏️ #1120scorpio #artinstituteofchicago #artwork #masterpieces #loveofthearts #fieldtrip
#thankfulthrowback :: #chicago, a city that does all of the hard work for you. 💛 #fallback #aesthetics #citylife {11.01.18} 🍁🚕🌆
“The fear of love” By: Jean-Louis Lemoyne
“The fear of love” By: Jean-Louis Lemoyne
Shown for the first time in the United States, a large collection of ukiyo-e paintings brings the “floating world” and its metropolitan amusements to life. 
In the 17th century, Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo (now Tokyo) were Japan’s thriving cities, complete with bustling entertainment districts where ukiyo, or the “floating world,” was born. People of all ranks shared in the enjoyment of the floating world’s attractions—brothels, kabuki theater, and seasonal festivities. The collection focuses on images of bijin (beauties). Whether courtesans, geisha, actors, or women in scenes of everyday life, bijinga (pictures of beauties) embody the floating world’s ideals of style and sophistication. The paintings’ subjects served as important cultural figures: fashion icons, celebrities, and even stand-ins for historical and legendary characters.

Wiki defines the floating world is the urban lifestyle, especially the pleasure-seeking aspects, during the Edo-period Japan (1600–1867). @artinstitutechi #artatlunch #asianart
Shown for the first time in the United States, a large collection of ukiyo-e paintings brings the “floating world” and its metropolitan amusements to life. In the 17th century, Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo (now Tokyo) were Japan’s thriving cities, complete with bustling entertainment districts where ukiyo, or the “floating world,” was born. People of all ranks shared in the enjoyment of the floating world’s attractions—brothels, kabuki theater, and seasonal festivities. The collection focuses on images of bijin (beauties). Whether courtesans, geisha, actors, or women in scenes of everyday life, bijinga (pictures of beauties) embody the floating world’s ideals of style and sophistication. The paintings’ subjects served as important cultural figures: fashion icons, celebrities, and even stand-ins for historical and legendary characters. Wiki defines the floating world is the urban lifestyle, especially the pleasure-seeking aspects, during the Edo-period Japan (1600–1867). @artinstitutechi #artatlunch  #asianart