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Golden Age Wo.ans Traditional Dance,  at the fscs pow-wow 2018. This lady inspires me! ūüėć
Golden Age Wo.ans Traditional Dance, at the fscs pow-wow 2018. This lady inspires me! ūüėć
Golden age womans traditional dance,  at the  fscs pow-wow  2018. This lady is so inspirational!
Golden age womans traditional dance, at the fscs pow-wow 2018. This lady is so inspirational!
Teens  Fancy Shawl @ fscs pow-wow 2018.

FANCY SHAWL
The Fancy Shawl Dance is the most modern and newest style of Indigenous dances. It originated in the early 1950's & 60's with the Northern tribes along the U.S.-Canadian border. Back then, it was called Graceful Shawl Dance because the steps weren't nearly as lively as they are today. The dance's current name comes from the still graceful, but much fancier footwork. The Fancy Shawl Dance now is a very strenuous one that requires much athletic skill.

Representing butterfly wings, the women move fast; twirling, kicking, and performing intricate steps that are individually choreographed. This allows the female dancers the opportunity for self-expression. The dance requirements, however, are that the steps be always in time with the drum and that the lady ends with both feet on the ground at the last beat. Not only do the STEPS signify the butterfly in flight, but also, the dancer's regalia emphasizes this magnificent beauty.

The color scheme ties together the dress, shawl, moccasins, and accessories. And more importantly, the colors have tribal or personal significance to the dancer. The fringed shawl is worn around the shoulders and is unfurled during the dance, becoming an integral part of the lady's self-expression.

The Fancy Shawl Dance is a splash of color, fringe, and footwork, each step so quick and light that the young woman almost looks as though she's dancing on air. Finally, there are different versions of the butterfly legend on which the Fancy Shawl Dance is based. One way to tell it is that there was a beautiful butterfly who lost her mate in a battle. In mourning, she wrapped herself in a cocoon and traveled the world over, stepping on every stone until she found the right one and was able to start her life anew. When she discovered this stone, she celebrated new life with such sheer radiance, that she seemed to be dancing while in flight. It is said that in the old days, when young women came out of mourning, they danced this dance. So, when the Fancy Shawl dancer steps and twirls, she lives out the legend and represents the butterfly's joyful wings. She celebrates new life.
Teens Fancy Shawl @ fscs pow-wow 2018. FANCY SHAWL The Fancy Shawl Dance is the most modern and newest style of Indigenous dances. It originated in the early 1950's & 60's with the Northern tribes along the U.S.-Canadian border. Back then, it was called Graceful Shawl Dance because the steps weren't nearly as lively as they are today. The dance's current name comes from the still graceful, but much fancier footwork. The Fancy Shawl Dance now is a very strenuous one that requires much athletic skill. Representing butterfly wings, the women move fast; twirling, kicking, and performing intricate steps that are individually choreographed. This allows the female dancers the opportunity for self-expression. The dance requirements, however, are that the steps be always in time with the drum and that the lady ends with both feet on the ground at the last beat. Not only do the STEPS signify the butterfly in flight, but also, the dancer's regalia emphasizes this magnificent beauty. The color scheme ties together the dress, shawl, moccasins, and accessories. And more importantly, the colors have tribal or personal significance to the dancer. The fringed shawl is worn around the shoulders and is unfurled during the dance, becoming an integral part of the lady's self-expression. The Fancy Shawl Dance is a splash of color, fringe, and footwork, each step so quick and light that the young woman almost looks as though she's dancing on air. Finally, there are different versions of the butterfly legend on which the Fancy Shawl Dance is based. One way to tell it is that there was a beautiful butterfly who lost her mate in a battle. In mourning, she wrapped herself in a cocoon and traveled the world over, stepping on every stone until she found the right one and was able to start her life anew. When she discovered this stone, she celebrated new life with such sheer radiance, that she seemed to be dancing while in flight. It is said that in the old days, when young women came out of mourning, they danced this dance. So, when the Fancy Shawl dancer steps and twirls, she lives out the legend and represents the butterfly's joyful wings. She celebrates new life.
Teen Boys Grass Dance @ fscs pow-wow 2018.

The Grass dance or Omaha dance is a style of modern Indigenous Male  pow-wow dancing originating in the warrior societies on the Northern Great Plains. Unlike most forms of pow-wow dancing, the grass dance regalia generally has no feathers besides the occasional roach feather. Instead the regalia consists of brightly colored fringe made of either yarn, broadcloth, or ribbon.

The original creator of the grass dance and the purpose of the dance is widely contested. Sources attribute possible origins to the Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Dakota, or Winnebago tribes. While the specific tribe of origin is unknown, it is generally accepted as a Northern Plains dance that was used by warrior societies.

There are several stories behind the origins of the grass dance. One is that a medicine man told a handicapped boy to seek inspiration in the prairie. There he observed the swaying of the grass and received a vision of himself dancing the same style as the grass. When he shared this vision with his village, the use of his legs was returned to him and he performed the first grass dance.

Other origins attribute the grass dance to scouts blessing and flattening the grass for a ceremony, dance, or battle. The dancers would also then tie braided grass into their belts.Tying grass to the belt is believed to have led to the yarn and ribbons common today.
Teen Boys Grass Dance @ fscs pow-wow 2018. The Grass dance or Omaha dance is a style of modern Indigenous Male  pow-wow dancing originating in the warrior societies on the Northern Great Plains. Unlike most forms of pow-wow dancing, the grass dance regalia generally has no feathers besides the occasional roach feather. Instead the regalia consists of brightly colored fringe made of either yarn, broadcloth, or ribbon. The original creator of the grass dance and the purpose of the dance is widely contested. Sources attribute possible origins to the Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Dakota, or Winnebago tribes. While the specific tribe of origin is unknown, it is generally accepted as a Northern Plains dance that was used by warrior societies. There are several stories behind the origins of the grass dance. One is that a medicine man told a handicapped boy to seek inspiration in the prairie. There he observed the swaying of the grass and received a vision of himself dancing the same style as the grass. When he shared this vision with his village, the use of his legs was returned to him and he performed the first grass dance. Other origins attribute the grass dance to scouts blessing and flattening the grass for a ceremony, dance, or battle. The dancers would also then tie braided grass into their belts.Tying grass to the belt is believed to have led to the yarn and ribbons common today.
Womans traditional @ fscs pow-wow  2018.

The Women's Traditional Dance is the very oldest form of dance for ladies. Females of all ages are seen dancing this very regal and proud style. Pride of heritage, culture, and family can be seen in the faces and demeanor of these well-respected dancers. In fact, when performing this style in competitions, judges watch the ladies to see if the required dignity is retained all throughout the dance. 
When moving in the Circle, there are Northern and Southern ways of dancing Women's Traditional. Northern style is danced by remaining in one spot, lightly bouncing in rhythm with the drum. Southern style has the women slowly and gracefully walking around the Circle in time with the drum, gently stepping toe-heel, toe-heel with the feet appearing to "walk on clouds". Both styles carry a fringed shawl folded over their bent left arm, a purse in their left hand, and a feather fan, usually eagle or hawk, in their right hand. 
The women hold themselves tall and proud, their bodies straight. The fringe on the shawl is to sway naturally with the movements of the women's feet, not from upper body bending or swinging. The fan is raised in salute when the women hear the drum giving honor beats. 
Some ladies will also bend at the waist at this time, remaining in one spot or taking a certain number of steps inward toward the middle of the Circle. At all times, the dancers are to stay in time with the drum and stop precisely when the drumming ends. The ladies wear knee-length beaded moccasins, leggings, and either a bucksin or cloth dress that has long, open sleeves. There are two styles of buckskin dress; once again, Northern and Southern. The Northern style is to completely bead the shoulder or cape part of the dress, whereas, the Southern style uses beadwork mainly as an accent. Also in bucksin regalia, the moccasins are either fully beaded (Northern) or accent-beaded southern.
Womans traditional @ fscs pow-wow 2018. The Women's Traditional Dance is the very oldest form of dance for ladies. Females of all ages are seen dancing this very regal and proud style. Pride of heritage, culture, and family can be seen in the faces and demeanor of these well-respected dancers. In fact, when performing this style in competitions, judges watch the ladies to see if the required dignity is retained all throughout the dance. When moving in the Circle, there are Northern and Southern ways of dancing Women's Traditional. Northern style is danced by remaining in one spot, lightly bouncing in rhythm with the drum. Southern style has the women slowly and gracefully walking around the Circle in time with the drum, gently stepping toe-heel, toe-heel with the feet appearing to "walk on clouds". Both styles carry a fringed shawl folded over their bent left arm, a purse in their left hand, and a feather fan, usually eagle or hawk, in their right hand. The women hold themselves tall and proud, their bodies straight. The fringe on the shawl is to sway naturally with the movements of the women's feet, not from upper body bending or swinging. The fan is raised in salute when the women hear the drum giving honor beats. Some ladies will also bend at the waist at this time, remaining in one spot or taking a certain number of steps inward toward the middle of the Circle. At all times, the dancers are to stay in time with the drum and stop precisely when the drumming ends. The ladies wear knee-length beaded moccasins, leggings, and either a bucksin or cloth dress that has long, open sleeves. There are two styles of buckskin dress; once again, Northern and Southern. The Northern style is to completely bead the shoulder or cape part of the dress, whereas, the Southern style uses beadwork mainly as an accent. Also in bucksin regalia, the moccasins are either fully beaded (Northern) or accent-beaded southern.
Mens Fancy Dance @ fscs pow-wow  2018.

Fancy dance, Pan-Indian dancing, Fancy Feather or Fancy War Dance is a style of dance some believe was originally created by members of the Ponca tribe in the 1920s and 1930s, in an attempt to preserve their culture and religion. It is loosely based on the War dance. Fancy dance was considered appropriate to be performed for visitors to reservations and at "Wild West" shows. But today, fancy dancers can be seen at many powwows across the nation and even the world.

Men's fancy dance is flashy, colorful and highly energetic. It requires strength and stamina and is usually performed by younger men and boys. The drum can play a medium war beat, a ruffle, crow hop, and a fast beat. It is always expected that a fancy dancer should do a pose at each end of the beat. Some might do splits or stop in mid-air. Male fancy dancers typically wear brightly colored regalia. Twin feather bustles are one of the hallmarks of modern fancy dance regalia, along with a beaded bodice, leggings or breech cloth and side tabs (most popular), bells just below the knees, Icelandic sheep hair or also known as "Goats", moccasins, a roach with two feathers (Most wear a roach rocker which rocks the feathers with the dancer's movements), beaded cuffs, beaded headband, and other feathered or beaded accouterments. The regalia often has a fringe of many colors. The old style regalia is making a comeback.
Mens Fancy Dance @ fscs pow-wow 2018. Fancy dance, Pan-Indian dancing, Fancy Feather or Fancy War Dance is a style of dance some believe was originally created by members of the Ponca tribe in the 1920s and 1930s, in an attempt to preserve their culture and religion. It is loosely based on the War dance. Fancy dance was considered appropriate to be performed for visitors to reservations and at "Wild West" shows. But today, fancy dancers can be seen at many powwows across the nation and even the world. Men's fancy dance is flashy, colorful and highly energetic. It requires strength and stamina and is usually performed by younger men and boys. The drum can play a medium war beat, a ruffle, crow hop, and a fast beat. It is always expected that a fancy dancer should do a pose at each end of the beat. Some might do splits or stop in mid-air. Male fancy dancers typically wear brightly colored regalia. Twin feather bustles are one of the hallmarks of modern fancy dance regalia, along with a beaded bodice, leggings or breech cloth and side tabs (most popular), bells just below the knees, Icelandic sheep hair or also known as "Goats", moccasins, a roach with two feathers (Most wear a roach rocker which rocks the feathers with the dancer's movements), beaded cuffs, beaded headband, and other feathered or beaded accouterments. The regalia often has a fringe of many colors. The old style regalia is making a comeback.
Mens Grass Dance @ fscs pow-wow  2018. 
The Grass dance or Omaha dance is a style of modern Indigenous  men's pow wow dancing originating in the warrior societies on the Northern Great Plains. Unlike most forms of pow wow dancing, the grass dance regalia generally has no feathers besides the occasional roach feather. Instead the regalia consists of brightly colored fringe made of either yarn, broadcloth, or ribbon.

The original creator of the grass dance and the purpose of the dance is widely contested. Sources attribute possible origins to the Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Dakota, or Winnebago tribes. While the specific tribe of origin is unknown, it is generally accepted as a Northern Plains dance that was used by warrior societies.

There are several stories behind the origins of the grass dance. One is that a medicine man told a handicapped boy to seek inspiration in the prairie. There he observed the swaying of the grass and received a vision of himself dancing the same style as the grass. When he shared this vision with his village, the use of his legs was returned to him and he performed the first grass dance.

Other origins attribute the grass dance to scouts blessing and flattening the grass for a ceremony, dance, or battle. The dancers would also then tie braided grass into their belts. Tying grass to the belt is believed to have led to the yarn and ribbons common today.
Mens Grass Dance @ fscs pow-wow 2018. The Grass dance or Omaha dance is a style of modern Indigenous  men's pow wow dancing originating in the warrior societies on the Northern Great Plains. Unlike most forms of pow wow dancing, the grass dance regalia generally has no feathers besides the occasional roach feather. Instead the regalia consists of brightly colored fringe made of either yarn, broadcloth, or ribbon. The original creator of the grass dance and the purpose of the dance is widely contested. Sources attribute possible origins to the Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Dakota, or Winnebago tribes. While the specific tribe of origin is unknown, it is generally accepted as a Northern Plains dance that was used by warrior societies. There are several stories behind the origins of the grass dance. One is that a medicine man told a handicapped boy to seek inspiration in the prairie. There he observed the swaying of the grass and received a vision of himself dancing the same style as the grass. When he shared this vision with his village, the use of his legs was returned to him and he performed the first grass dance. Other origins attribute the grass dance to scouts blessing and flattening the grass for a ceremony, dance, or battle. The dancers would also then tie braided grass into their belts. Tying grass to the belt is believed to have led to the yarn and ribbons common today.
Mens Traditional Dance @ fscs pow-wow  2018.

The Straight Dance, also known as Southern Straight Dance or Southern Traditional, is a style of Indigenous  pow wow dancing. The dance recounts the story of hunting or war parties searching for the enemy.
Mens Traditional Dance @ fscs pow-wow 2018. The Straight Dance, also known as Southern Straight Dance or Southern Traditional, is a style of Indigenous  pow wow dancing. The dance recounts the story of hunting or war parties searching for the enemy.
I had such an awesome weekend at the Powwow, glad I got to spend with some pretty amazing people‚̧ԳŹFSCS Powwow‚úÖ *ignore the fact I look like the real life Maui*
I had such an awesome weekend at the Powwow, glad I got to spend with some pretty amazing people‚̧ԳŹFSCS Powwow‚úÖ *ignore the fact I look like the real life Maui*